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A journal dedicated to truth, freedom of speech and radical spiritual consciousness. Our mission is the liberation of men and women from oppression, violence and abuse of any kind, interpersonal, political, religious, economic, psychosexual. We believe as Fidel Castro said, "The weapon of today is not guns but consciousness."

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    The Black Arts Movement Poets Choir and Arkestra is now available for concerts benefiting the Black Arts Movement Business District. Please consider inviting us for a benefit concert at your venue. Depending on their schedule, we will be accompanied by YGB, Young, Gifted and Black.

    For booking, please call 510-200-4164

     l
     The BAM's multi-talented Kujichagulia
     

    The Black Arts Movement Poets Choir and Arkestra, University of California, Merced, 2014

    BAM Poets Choir and Arkestra, Malcolm X Jazz/Art Festival, Oakland CA, 2014
    photo collage by Adam Turner, BAM graphics designer

    BAM poet/organizer Marvin X, David Murray and Earle Davis, Malcolm X Jazz/Art Fest, Oakland
    photo Adam Turner

    BAM performer Dr. Ayodele Nzinga, poet, playwright, producer, director, actress

    BAM Poets Choir and Arkestra members Tureada Mikel, Val Serrant and Tarika Lewis

    BAM poet Paradise Jah Love

    BAM singer Mechelle LaChaux

    Special Guests 
    YGB
    Young Gifted and Black



    For booking, please call 510-200-4164

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    "Donald Trump is Marvin X rich and white!"
    --Elliot Bey, Philadelphia PA

    Donald Trump in Univision's black list - Abasto

    Donald Trump, the Last White Man

    Marvin X's smart mouth oldest daughter, Nefertiti, told her father after meeting his agent, Peter Howard (RIP), a rich white man,"Dad, Peter is just like you, an intelligent, arrogant bastard!" Enter Donald Trump, another intelligent, arrogant bastard, and rich, unlike Marvin who was described by one of his students as the poorest famous person she'd ever met. For star worshipers, Donald and Marvin are both Gemini, usually known for intelligence and duplicity, multiple personalities, and throw in a little or a lot of narcissism.

    Marvin X was born a Black nationalist, i.e., his parents were known as Race people, Blacks who were for their people. If Donald Trump is not a white nationalist, none exists anywhere in the world. Marvin X says, "I'm not mad at Donald Trump for being a white nationalist. Every person should stand and defend their own kind, otherwise they're a sellout. Donald is fighting to preserve the last vestige of white supremacy in America, but the world is already majority non-white and America is on the precipice of becoming the same."

    So Donald is like a child in Toys R US fighting for the last toy before a new shipment arrives from, yes, China. He is a dramatic persona with that tragic flaw of arrogance and hubris or overwhelming pride in himself and his people. No other people matter for his vision is warped in dreams of a white Christmas that shall be no more. As many of his brothers are doing, he should consider suicide since, as Baldwin said, "White supremacy has led white people to rationalizations so fantastic it approaches the pathological."

    But, no, Donald is a mad warrior who must represent all those white men who cannot understand why their world is coming to an end. And so he is in battle with the shadow on the wall that is not of himself but the breathing world in which he shall exist in name only, for sure not in any dominant position, no matter his military budget, no matter the building of a Chinese style or Israeli style wall to keep out the barbarians. Alas, the barbarians are Donald and his brothers, Vandals who are their own worse enemies and who shall ultimately destroy themselves because they are constitutionally unable to change.

    This is the difference between Marvin and Donald. Those who know Marvin know he is a personality in constant transformation, although basically a Black nationalist. Have you seen him embracing the white woman, Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf? She supported the creation of Oakland's Black Arts Movement Business District along the 14th Street corridor, downtown. The legislation was pushed through by Lynette McElhaney, President of the City Council. Google Marvin's essay In Search of My Soul Sister, in which he delineates the difference between Condi Rice and Barbara Boxer.

     Marvin X and Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf at Laney College, 2015 BAM 50th Anniversary Celebration
    photo Jahahara

    Marvin X and Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf at opening of Marshawn Lynch's Beast Mode outlet, 2016
    photo Troy Williams 

    But Marvin realized long ago when he taught in universities and colleges, especially when he had classrooms of mostly white students, a teacher who hates his students is a very sick puppy and he had no intention to be that puppy. He embraced his white students and they embraced him. He could see they needed knowledge and truth to dispel the world of make believe they inherited from their racist parents.

    It would be good if Donald Trump, in these Last Days of Whitey, could really become the man he claims to be. For sure, he is trying his best to be brutally honest, a phenomena most of his brothers and sisters cannot phantom. But in his honesty is a plethora of lies and half truths that cannot and will not stand no matter how adamantly he proclaims such antiquated notions of his world of make believe. He will not be able to exterminate those he feels are roaches, simply because there are too many of them and the blow black will be horrific for Donald and his brothers. They may be forced to undergo long term recovery in some facility like Gitmo.

    Gitmo: 10 years of injustice and disgrace - CNN.com

    Take a good look at wars America is engaged in at this hour: Libya, Yemen, Somalia, Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan, etc. She is losing everywhere, in fact, hasn't won a war since World War II. She's still fighting North Korea, she lost in Vietnam. War! What is is good for? The military industrial complex, the global bloodsuckers of the poor? Imagine, she's been bombing Iraq twenty-five years, Afghanistan sixteen. How long can this go on? And he wants to bomb the hell out of ISIS and take their oil? How can America bomb the hell out of ISIS when she is supplying ISIS? Donald knows the truth so why all the drama to deceive the 99%, the deaf, dumb and blind of America, White, Black, Latino/Latina, Asians and Aboriginal?

    He may be bluntly honest but at his core he is delusional, his soul atrophied, as ancestor poet Amiri Baraka wrote in A Black Mass, "Where the soul's print should be there is only a cellulose pouch of disgusting habits."

    I may be an intelligent, arrogant bastard, but someone said, "At his best, Marvin X is clarity of perception."

    I can see clearly the world of Donald Trump will be, at best, ephemeral. It is good to see he is trying to stand tall and represent the last hope of White American manhood, but it is too late. The condition of the patient is terminal, he cannot be rusticated. So have a good laugh, Donald,  just know he who laughs last, laughs the longest! We are convinced, the suffering masses shall have the last laugh!

    My friends are laughing at me this hour. They are mystified that from a tent and table on 14th and Broadway, downtown, I am able to influence the politics of Oakland. How can a man with two dollars demand one billion dollars for his people? But I do so with humility, not arrogance. I heard it said, "Ask and it shall be given."



    Marvin X at his Academy of da Corner, in the Black Arts Movement District, 14th and Broadway, down town Oakland. photo Adam Turner

    So we wish you well, Donald Trump, your people need your tragic flaws at this hour. Perhaps you can help them realize their flaws as they rejoice in yours.
    --Marvin X
    2/9/16


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    www.harambeeradio.com

    Peace, Brothah Marvin X...

    ThAnkh you very kindly for agreeing to be the featured speaker on 'What The Problem Is with Sistah Q,  Live on Harambee Radio' Thursday evening 11 February 2016 from 8 to 9 pm eastern time.
    www.harambeeradio.com


    Listen to Brothah Marvin X on "What The Problem Is with Sistah Q Live on Harambee Radio" Thursday 11 February 2016 from 8 to 9 pm eastern time as he discusses The Black Arts Movement Business District in Oakland, California.

    Listen online at HarambeeRadio.com
    or on your phone.
    Call-in number:805-309-0111
    Conference ID number:
    840360#

    Peace...
    Sistah Q

    Marvin X will speak on the Black Arts Movement Business District, Oakland. He spoke in Oakland today at the rally for the Malonga Center mural. A multi-cultural crowd of artists and arts organizations gathered at 14th and Alice in the parking lot to protest the City approving plans for a 16 story market rate apartment complex on the parking lot. They marched down 14th to Oakland City Hall to let the politicians know people come before developers. As we write, the Post News Group and Betti Ono Gallery in the BAMBD must move due to rent increases. Such is the problem throughout Oakland. Marvin X told the Malonga protesters, "Oakland is a radical city so we must stand tall and resist. The devil never sleeps, he just changes shifts. So we must stay awake or wake up in a hurry and stay on the case until victory. Yes, the City declared the Black Arts Movement Business District, but where's the budget to make it a reality?"

    "Donald Trump is Marvin X rich and white!"
    --Elliot Bey, Philadelphia PA

    Donald Trump in Univision's black list - Abasto

    Donald Trump, the Last White Man


    PicMonkey Collage - NY Daily News

     Marvin X and daughter Nefertiti at Oakland's Laney College, 2015
    photo Ken Johnson

    Marvin X's smart mouth oldest daughter, Nefertiti, told her father after meeting his agent, Peter Howard (RIP), a rich white man,"Dad, Peter is just like you, an intelligent, arrogant bastard!" Enter Donald Trump, another intelligent, arrogant bastard, and rich, unlike Marvin who was described by one of his students as the poorest famous person she'd ever met. For star worshipers, Donald and Marvin are both Gemini, usually known for intelligence and duplicity, multiple personalities, and throw in a little or a lot of narcissism.

    Marvin X was born a Black nationalist, i.e., his parents were known as Race people, Blacks who were for their people. If Donald Trump is not a white nationalist, none exists anywhere in the world. Marvin X says, "I'm not mad at Donald Trump for being a white nationalist. Every person should stand and defend their own kind, otherwise they're a sellout. Donald is fighting to preserve the last vestige of white supremacy in America, but the world is already majority non-white and America is on the precipice of becoming the same."

    So Donald is like a child in Toys R US fighting for the last toy before a new shipment arrives from, yes, China. He is a dramatic persona with that tragic flaw of arrogance and hubris or overwhelming pride in himself and his people. No other people matter for his vision is warped in dreams of a white Christmas that shall be no more. As many of his brothers are doing, he should consider suicide since, as Baldwin said, "White supremacy has led white people to rationalizations so fantastic it approaches the pathological."

    But, no, Donald is a mad warrior who must represent all those white men who cannot understand why their world is coming to an end. And so he is in battle with the shadow on the wall that is not of himself but the breathing world in which he shall exist in name only, for sure not in any dominant position, no matter his military budget, no matter the building of a Chinese style or Israeli style wall to keep out the barbarians. Alas, the barbarians are Donald and his brothers, Vandals who are their own worse enemies and who shall ultimately destroy themselves because they are constitutionally unable to change.

    This is the difference between Marvin and Donald. Those who know Marvin know he is a personality in constant transformation, although basically a Black nationalist. Have you seen him embracing the white woman, Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf? She supported the creation of Oakland's Black Arts Movement Business District along the 14th Street corridor, downtown. The legislation was pushed through by Lynette McElhaney, President of the City Council. Google Marvin's essay In Search of My Soul Sister, in which he delineates the difference between Condi Rice and Barbara Boxer.

     Marvin X and Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf at Laney College, 2015 BAM 50th Anniversary Celebration
    photo Jahahara

    Marvin X and Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf at opening of Marshawn Lynch's Beast Mode outlet, 2016
    photo Troy Williams 

    But Marvin realized long ago when he taught in universities and colleges, especially when he had classrooms of mostly white students, a teacher who hates his students is a very sick puppy and he had no intention to be that puppy. He embraced his white students and they embraced him. He could see they needed knowledge and truth to dispel the world of make believe they inherited from their racist parents.

    It would be good if Donald Trump, in these Last Days of Whitey, could really become the man he claims to be. For sure, he is trying his best to be brutally honest, a phenomena most of his brothers and sisters cannot phantom. But in his honesty is a plethora of lies and half truths that cannot and will not stand no matter how adamantly he proclaims such antiquated notions of his world of make believe. He will not be able to exterminate those he feels are roaches, simply because there are too many of them and the blow black will be horrific for Donald and his brothers. They may be forced to undergo long term recovery in some facility like Gitmo.

    Gitmo: 10 years of injustice and disgrace - CNN.com

    Take a good look at wars America is engaged in at this hour: Libya, Yemen, Somalia, Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan, etc. She is losing everywhere, in fact, hasn't won a war since World War II. She's still fighting North Korea, she lost in Vietnam. War! What is is good for? The military industrial complex, the global bloodsuckers of the poor? Imagine, she's been bombing Iraq twenty-five years, Afghanistan sixteen. How long can this go on? And he wants to bomb the hell out of ISIS and take their oil? How can America bomb the hell out of ISIS when she is supplying ISIS? Donald knows the truth so why all the drama to deceive the 99%, the deaf, dumb and blind of America, White, Black, Latino/Latina, Asians and Aboriginal?

    He may be bluntly honest but at his core he is delusional, his soul atrophied, as ancestor poet Amiri Baraka wrote in A Black Mass, "Where the soul's print should be there is only a cellulose pouch of disgusting habits."

    I may be an intelligent, arrogant bastard, but someone said, "At his best, Marvin X is clarity of perception."

    I can see clearly the world of Donald Trump will be, at best, ephemeral. It is good to see he is trying to stand tall and represent the last hope of White American manhood, but it is too late. The condition of the patient is terminal, he cannot be rusticated. So have a good laugh, Donald,  just know he who laughs last, laughs the longest! We are convinced, the suffering masses shall have the last laugh!

    My friends are laughing at me this hour. They are mystified that from a tent and table on 14th and Broadway, downtown, I am able to influence the politics of Oakland. How can a man with two dollars demand one billion dollars for his people? But I do so with humility, not arrogance. I heard it said, "Ask and it shall be given."


    Marvin X at his Academy of da Corner, in the Black Arts Movement District, 14th and Broadway, down town Oakland. photo Adam Turner

    So we wish you well, Donald Trump, your people need your tragic flaws at this hour. Perhaps you can help them realize their flaws as they rejoice in yours.
    --Marvin X
    2/9/16





    From:"sistahq@whattheproblemis.com"
    To: sistahq@pantherpaw.info
    Sent: Wednesday, February 10, 2016 10:05 PM
    Subject: Bro. Marvin X Returns to 'What The Problem Is with Sistah Q Live on Harambee Radio'...


    Peace...

    Brothah Marvin X. Topic: The Black Arts Movement Business District, Oakland

    Listen to Brothah Marvin X on "What The Problem Is with Sistah Q Live on Harambee Radio" Thursday 11 February 2016 from 8 to 9 pm eastern time as he discusses The Black Arts Movement Business District in Oakland, California.

    Listen online at HarambeeRadio.com
    or on your phone.
    Call-in number:805-309-0111
    Conference ID number:
    840360#

    Peace...
    Sistah Q


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    Why Hillary Clinton 

    Doesn’t Deserve the Black VoteMichelle Alexander's The New Jim Crow

    From the crime bill to welfare reform, policies Bill Clinton enacted—and Hillary Clinton supported—decimated black America.


    Hillary Clinton loves black people. And black people love Hillary—or so it seems. Black politicians have lined up in droves to endorse her, eager to prove their loyalty to the Clintons in the hopes that their faithfulness will be remembered and rewarded. Black pastors are opening their church doors, and the Clintons are making themselves comfortably at home once again, engaging effortlessly in all the usual rituals associated with “courting the black vote,” a pursuit that typically begins and ends with Democratic politicians making black people feel liked and taken seriously. Doing something concrete to improve the conditions under which most black people live is generally not required.
    Hillary is looking to gain momentum on the campaign trail as the primaries move out of Iowa and New Hampshire and into states like South Carolina, where large pockets of black voters can be found. According to some polls, she leads Bernie Sanders by as much as 60 percent among African Americans. It seems that we—black people—are her winning card, one that Hillary is eager to play.
    And it seems we’re eager to get played. Again.

    The love affair between black folks and the Clintons has been going on for a long time. It began back in 1992, when Bill Clinton was running for president. He threw on some shades and played the saxophone on The Arsenio Hall Show. It seems silly in retrospect, but many of us fell for that. At a time when a popular slogan was “It’s a black thing, you wouldn’t understand,” Bill Clinton seemed to get us. When Toni Morrison dubbed him our first black president, we nodded our heads. We had our boy in the White House. Or at least we thought we did.

    Black voters have been remarkably loyal to the Clintons for more than 25 years. It’s true that we eventually lined up behind Barack Obama in 2008, but it’s a measure of the Clinton allure that Hillary led Obama among black voters until he started winning caucuses and primaries. Now Hillary is running again. This time she’s facing a democratic socialist who promises a political revolution that will bring universal healthcare, a living wage, an end to rampant Wall Street greed, and the dismantling of the vast prison state—many of the same goals that Martin Luther King Jr. championed at the end of his life. Even so, black folks are sticking with the Clinton brand.

    What have the Clintons done to earn such devotion? Did they take extreme political risks to defend the rights of African Americans? Did they courageously stand up to right-wing demagoguery about black communities? Did they help usher in a new era of hope and prosperity for neighborhoods devastated by deindustrialization, globalization, and the disappearance of work?
    No. Quite the opposite.
    * * *
    When Bill Clinton ran for president in 1992, urban black communities across America were suffering from economic collapse. Hundreds of thousands of manufacturing jobs had vanished as factories moved overseas in search of cheaper labor, a new plantation. Globalization and deindustrialization affected workers of all colors but hit African Americans particularly hard. Unemployment rates among young black men had quadrupled as the rate of industrial employment plummeted. Crime rates spiked in inner-city communities that had been dependent on factory jobs, while hopelessness, despair, and crack addiction swept neighborhoods that had once been solidly working-class. Millions of black folks—many of whom had fled Jim Crow segregation in the South with the hope of obtaining decent work in Northern factories—were suddenly trapped in racially segregated, jobless ghettos.

    On the campaign trail, Bill Clinton made the economy his top priority and argued persuasively that conservatives were using race to divide the nation and divert attention from the failed economy. In practice, however, he capitulated entirely to the right-wing backlash against the civil-rights movement and embraced former president Ronald Reagan’s agenda on race, crime, welfare, and taxes—ultimately doing more harm to black communities than Reagan ever did.
    We should have seen it coming. Back then, Clinton was the standard-bearer for the New Democrats, a group that firmly believed the only way to win back the millions of white voters in the South who had defected to the Republican Party was to adopt the right-wing narrative that black communities ought to be disciplined with harsh punishment rather than coddled with welfare. Reagan had won the presidency by dog-whistling to poor and working-class whites with coded racial appeals: railing against “welfare queens” and criminal “predators” and condemning “big government.” Clinton aimed to win them back, vowing that he would never permit any Republican to be perceived as tougher on crime than he.

    Just weeks before the critical New Hampshire primary, Clinton proved his toughness by flying back to Arkansas to oversee the execution of Ricky Ray Rector, a mentally impaired black man who had so little conception of what was about to happen to him that he asked for the dessert from his last meal to be saved for him for later. After the execution, Clinton remarked, “I can be nicked a lot, but no one can say I’m soft on crime.”

    Clinton mastered the art of sending mixed cultural messages, appealing to African Americans by belting out “Lift Every Voice and Sing” in black churches, while at the same time signaling to poor and working-class whites that he was willing to be tougher on black communities than Republicans had been.

    Clinton was praised for his no-nonsense, pragmatic approach to racial politics. He won the election and appointed a racially diverse cabinet that “looked like America.” He won re-election four years later, and the American economy rebounded. Democrats cheered. The Democratic Party had been saved. The Clintons won. Guess who lost?
    * * *
    Bill Clinton presided over the largest increase in federal and state prison inmates of any president in American history. Clinton did not declare the War on Crime or the War on Drugs—those wars were declared before Reagan was elected and long before crack hit the streets—but he escalated it beyond what many conservatives had imagined possible. He supported the 100-to-1 sentencing disparity for crack versus powder cocaine, which produced staggering racial injustice in sentencing and boosted funding for drug-law enforcement.

    Clinton championed the idea of a federal “three strikes” law in his 1994 State of the Union address and, months later, signed a $30 billion crime bill that created dozens of new federal capital crimes, mandated life sentences for some three-time offenders, and authorized more than $16 billion for state prison grants and the expansion of police forces. The legislation was hailed by mainstream-media outlets as a victory for the Democrats, who “were able to wrest the crime issue from the Republicans and make it their own.”

    When Clinton left office in 2001, the United States had the highest rate of incarceration in the world. Human Rights Watch reported that in seven states, African Americans constituted 80 to 90 percent of all drug offenders sent to prison, even though they were no more likely than whites to use or sell illegal drugs. Prison admissions for drug offenses reached a level in 2000 for African Americans more than 26 times the level in 1983. All of the presidents since 1980 have contributed to mass incarceration, but as Equal Justice Initiative founder Bryan Stevenson recently observed, “President Clinton’s tenure was the worst.”

    Some might argue that it’s unfair to judge Hillary Clinton for the policies her husband championed years ago. But Hillary wasn’t picking out china while she was first lady. She bravely broke the mold and redefined that job in ways no woman ever had before. She not only campaigned for Bill; she also wielded power and significant influence once he was elected, lobbying for legislation and other measures. That record, and her statements from that era, should be scrutinized. In her support for the 1994 crime bill, for example, she used racially coded rhetoric to cast black children as animals. “They are not just gangs of kids anymore,” she said. “They are often the kinds of kids that are called ‘super-predators.’ No conscience, no empathy. We can talk about why they ended up that way, but first we have to bring them to heel.”

    Both Clintons now express regret over the crime bill, and Hillary says she supports criminal-justice reforms to undo some of the damage that was done by her husband’s administration. But on the campaign trail, she continues to invoke the economy and country that Bill Clinton left behind as a legacy she would continue. So what exactly did the Clinton economy look like for black Americans? Taking a hard look at this recent past is about more than just a choice between two candidates. It’s about whether the Democratic Party can finally reckon with what its policies have done to African-American communities, and whether it can redeem itself and rightly earn the loyalty of black voters.
    * * *
    An oft-repeated myth about the Clinton administration is that although it was overly tough on crime back in the 1990s, at least its policies were good for the economy and for black unemployment rates. The truth is more troubling. As unemployment rates sank to historically low levels for white Americans in the 1990s, the jobless rate among black men in their 20s who didn’t have a college degree rose to its highest level ever. This increase in joblessness was propelled by the skyrocketing incarceration rate.

    Why is this not common knowledge? Because government statistics like poverty and unemployment rates do not include incarcerated people. As Harvard sociologist Bruce Western explains: “Much of the optimism about declines in racial inequality and the power of the US model of economic growth is misplaced once we account for the invisible poor, behind the walls of America’s prisons and jails.” When Clinton left office in 2001, the true jobless rate for young, non-college-educated black men (including those behind bars) was 42 percent. This figure was never reported. Instead, the media claimed that unemployment rates for African Americans had fallen to record lows, neglecting to mention that this miracle was possible only because incarceration rates were now at record highs. Young black men weren’t looking for work at high rates during the Clinton era because they were now behind bars—out of sight, out of mind, and no longer counted in poverty and unemployment statistics.

    To make matters worse, the federal safety net for poor families was torn to shreds by the Clinton administration in its effort to “end welfare as we know it.” In his 1996 State of the Union address, given during his re-election campaign, Clinton declared that “the era of big government is over” and immediately sought to prove it by dismantling the federal welfare system known as Aid to Families With Dependent Children (AFDC). The welfare-reform legislation that he signed—which Hillary Clinton ardently supported then and characterized as a success as recently as 2008—replaced the federal safety net with a block grant to the states, imposed a five-year lifetime limit on welfare assistance, added work requirements, barred undocumented immigrants from licensed professions, and slashed overall public welfare funding by $54 billion (some was later restored).
    Experts and pundits disagree about the true impact of welfare reform, but one thing seems clear: Extreme poverty doubled to 1.5 million in the decade and a half after the law was passed. What is extreme poverty? US households are considered to be in extreme poverty if they are surviving on cash incomes of no more than $2 per person per day in any given month. We tend to think of extreme poverty existing in Third World countries, but here in the United States, shocking numbers of people are struggling to survive on less money per month than many families spend in one evening dining out. Currently, the United States, the richest nation on the planet, has one of the highest child-poverty rates in the developed world.

    Despite claims that radical changes in crime and welfare policy were driven by a desire to end big government and save taxpayer dollars, the reality is that the Clinton administration didn’t reduce the amount of money devoted to the management of the urban poor; it changed what the funds would be used for. Billions of dollars were slashed from public-housing and child-welfare budgets and transferred to the mass-incarceration machine. By 1996, the penal budget was twice the amount that had been allocated to food stamps. During Clinton’s tenure, funding for public housing was slashed by $17 billion (a reduction of 61 percent), while funding for corrections was boosted by $19 billion (an increase of 171 percent), according to sociologist Loïc Wacquant “effectively making the construction of prisons the nation’s main housing program for the urban poor.”

    Bill Clinton championed discriminatory laws against formerly incarcerated people that have kept millions of Americans locked in a cycle of poverty and desperation. The Clinton administration eliminated Pell grants for prisoners seeking higher education to prepare for their release, supported laws denying federal financial aid to students with drug convictions, and signed legislation imposing a lifetime ban on welfare and food stamps for anyone convicted of a felony drug offense—an exceptionally harsh provision given the racially biased drug war that was raging in inner cities.
    Perhaps most alarming, Clinton also made it easier for public-housing agencies to deny shelter to anyone with any sort of criminal history (even an arrest without conviction) and championed the “one strike and you’re out” initiative, which meant that families could be evicted from public housing because one member (or a guest) had committed even a minor offense. People released from prison with no money, no job, and nowhere to go could no longer return home to their loved ones living in federally assisted housing without placing the entire family at risk of eviction. Purging “the criminal element” from public housing played well on the evening news, but no provisions were made for people and families as they were forced out on the street. By the end of Clinton’s presidency, more than half of working-age African-American men in many large urban areas were saddled with criminal records and subject to legalized discrimination in employment, housing, access to education, and basic public benefits—relegated to a permanent second-class status eerily reminiscent of Jim Crow.

    It is difficult to overstate the damage that’s been done. Generations have been lost to the prison system; countless families have been torn apart or rendered homeless; and a school-to-prison pipeline has been born that shuttles young people from their decrepit, underfunded schools to brand-new high-tech prisons.
    * * *
    It didn’t have to be like this. As a nation, we had a choice. Rather than spending billions of dollars constructing a vast new penal system, those billions could have been spent putting young people to work in inner-city communities and investing in their schools so they might have some hope of making the transition from an industrial to a service-based economy. Constructive interventions would have been good not only for African Americans trapped in ghettos, but for blue-collar workers of all colors. At the very least, Democrats could have fought to prevent the further destruction of black communities rather than ratcheting up the wars declared on them.

    Of course, it can be said that it’s unfair to criticize the Clintons for punishing black people so harshly, given that many black people were on board with the “get tough” movement too. It is absolutely true that black communities back then were in a state of crisis, and that many black activists and politicians were desperate to get violent offenders off the streets. What is often missed, however, is that most of those black activists and politicians weren’t asking only for toughness. They were also demanding investment in their schools, better housing, jobs programs for young people, economic-stimulus packages, drug treatment on demand, and better access to healthcare. In the end, they wound up with police and prisons. To say that this was what black people wanted is misleading at best.
    To be fair, the Clintons now feel bad about how their politics and policies have worked out for black people. Bill says that he “overshot the mark” with his crime policies; and Hillary has put forth a plan to ban racial profiling, eliminate the sentencing disparities between crack and cocaine, and abolish private prisons, among other measures.

    But what about a larger agenda that would not just reverse some of the policies adopted during the Clinton era, but would rebuild the communities decimated by them? If you listen closely here, you’ll notice that Hillary Clinton is still singing the same old tune in a slightly different key. She is arguing that we ought not be seduced by Bernie’s rhetoric because we must be “pragmatic,” “face political realities,” and not get tempted to believe that we can fight for economic justice and win. When politicians start telling you that it is “unrealistic” to support candidates who want to build a movement for greater equality, fair wages, universal healthcare, and an end to corporate control of our political system, it’s probably best to leave the room.

    This is not an endorsement for Bernie Sanders, who after all voted for the 1994 crime bill. I also tend to agree with Ta-Nehisi Coates that the way the Sanders campaign handled the question of reparations is one of many signs that Bernie doesn’t quite get what’s at stake in serious dialogues about racial justice. He was wrong to dismiss reparations as “divisive,” as though centuries of slavery, segregation, discrimination, ghettoization, and stigmatization aren’t worthy of any specific acknowledgement or remedy.

    But recognizing that Bernie, like Hillary, has blurred vision when it comes to race is not the same thing as saying their views are equally problematic. Sanders opposed the 1996 welfare-reform law. He also opposed bank deregulation and the Iraq War, both of which Hillary supported, and both of which have proved disastrous. In short, there is such a thing as a lesser evil, and Hillary is not it.
    The biggest problem with Bernie, in the end, is that he’s running as a Democrat—as a member of a political party that not only capitulated to right-wing demagoguery but is now owned and controlled by a relatively small number of millionaires and billionaires. Yes, Sanders has raised millions from small donors, but should he become president, he would also become part of what he has otherwise derided as “the establishment.” Even if Bernie’s racial-justice views evolve, I hold little hope that a political revolution will occur within the Democratic Party without a sustained outside movement forcing truly transformational change. I am inclined to believe that it would be easier to build a new party than to save the Democratic Party from itself.
    She may be surprised to discover that the younger generation no longer wants to play her game. Or maybe not. Maybe we’ll all continue to play along and pretend that we don’t know how it will turn out in the end. Hopefully, one day, we’ll muster the courage to join together in a revolutionary movement with people of all colors who believe that basic human rights and economic, racial, and gender justice are not unreasonable, pie-in-the-sky goals. After decades of getting played, the sleeping giant just might wake up, stretch its limbs, and tell both parties: Game over. Move aside. It’s time to reshuffle this deck.



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    Beyoncé, Media Hype, 2016 Super Bowl Madness

    WATCH] Beyonce Falls? Super Bowl Halftime Show Almost Goes Wrong ...

     
    Beyonce and her Girl Gang


    NB Commentary: I enter this discussion kicking and screaming and swearing to myself that I am not, and I mean, am not gonna fall prey to the hype. But today, I had to come forth with another blog post.  I was compelled by the comments under many of the pictures posted of her and her girl gang at the Super Bowl and how some folks were actually seeing it as a Powerful Movement, a statement about Black Power, a high five to Malcolm X, and the insane indicators of it being an Illuminati ritual. But what really took me to the top of the clock was the actual lyrics, which in no way seem to reflect any of this, in fact quite the contrary. So here I am again, with something to rant on about That!!!

    Let me begin my rant with a shout out to Cookie Couture who posted the lyrics to Beyoncé song.
    "Thank you for this. You know how you witness something and something inside you goes off and tells you that there is something wrong with this because inside of you, you can feel it going in all kinds of different directions. Well, thanks again, I really appreciate you posting those lyrics!!"
    Nowadays, we cannot take lightly the impact of the media. It's in your face in an instant and manipulating you and brainwashing you in the millisecond. Nowadays, it's more dangerous due to the advance technology they can use to grab your brain and do all kinds of trickery with it.
    The invention of motion pictures and later television, herald the beginning of an epic age, where the minds of the masses are in the hands of the elite controllers who can massage, manipulate, brainwash and control the narrative to such a degree that people believe that what they see is real and true.
    People identify with the character on the screen so much so that they protect them as if they have an intimate relationship with them, all because of what they see on the screen. People project themselves into the personification of a made up image on the screen and it becomes their alters. For that matter, fans are as much MK-Ultra slaves as much as the people they Idolize and Adore. The Cult of Personality has replaced the Gods and Goddesses of ancient times.
    The people on the big screen are fallible human beings, but the masses need Gods so they elevate them to the status of "Gods" and defend their "Persona" as if it's real, or actually means anything. The psychological irony of this is that their "Persona" does mean something for the hungry masses, but 99% of them won't use this power for anything other than maintaining the status quo of the Elite Moguls who control them from behind the scenes. Their true creativity is eclipsed by the greed, avarice and debauchery that is the world of celebrity. If they step out of the mold that was designed for them, they will fail or meet a worse fate. Thus the hype is just that, hype, form no substance, yet the impact of such superficiality is as deadly has a thousand poison arrows.
    And Now to the Lyrics. You decide, how progressive these are.

    What happened at the New Wil’ins?
    Bitch, I'm back by popular demand
    [Refrain: Beyoncé]
    Y'all haters corny with that illuminati mess
    Paparazzi, catch my fly, and my cocky fresh
    I'm so reckless when I rock my Givenchy dress (stylin')
    I'm so possessive so I rock his Roc necklaces
    My daddy Alabama, Momma Louisiana
    You mix that negro with that Creole make a Texas bama
    I like my baby heir with baby hair and afros
    I like my negro nose with Jackson Five nostrils
    Earned all this money but they never take the country out me
    I got a hot sauce in my bag, swag
    [Interlude: Messy Mya + Big Freedia]
    Oh yeah, baby, oh yeah I, ohhhhh, oh, yes, I like that
    I did not come to play with you hoes, haha
    I came to slay, bitch
    I like cornbreads and collard greens, bitch
    Oh, yes, you besta believe it
    [Refrain: Beyoncé]
    Y'all haters corny with that illuminati mess
    Paparazzi, catch my fly, and my cocky fresh
    I'm so reckless when I rock my Givenchy dress (stylin')
    I'm so possessive so I rock his Roc necklaces
    My daddy Alabama, Momma Louisiana
    You mix that negro with that Creole make a Texas bama
    I like my baby heir with baby hair and afros
    I like my negro nose with Jackson Five nostrils
    Earned all this money but they never take the country out me
    I got a hot sauce in my bag, swag
    [Chorus: Beyoncé]
    I see it, I want it, I stunt, yellow-bone it
    I dream it, I work hard, I grind 'til I own it
    I twirl on them haters, albino alligators
    El Camino with the seat low, sippin' Cuervo with no chaser
    Sometimes I go off (I go off), I go hard (I go hard)
    Get what's mine (take what's mine), I'm a star (I'm a star)
    Cause I slay (slay), I slay (hey), I slay (okay), I slay (okay)
    All day (okay), I slay (okay), I slay (okay), I slay (okay)
    We gon' slay (slay), gon' slay (okay), we slay (okay), I slay (okay)
    I slay (okay), okay (okay), I slay (okay), okay, okay, okay, okay
    Okay, okay, ladies, now let's get in formation, cause I slay
    Okay, ladies, now let's get in formation, cause I slay
    Prove to me you got some coordination, cause I slay
    Slay trick, or you get eliminated
    [Verse: Beyoncé]
    When he fuck me good I take his ass to Red Lobster, cause I slay
    When he fuck me good I take his ass to Red Lobster, cause I slay
    If he hit it right, I might take him on a flight on my chopper, cause I slay
    Drop him off at the mall, let him buy some J's, let him shop up, cause I slay
    I might get your song played on the radio station, cause I slay
    I might get your song played on the radio station, cause I slay
    You just might be a black Bill Gates in the making, cause I slay
    I just might be a black Bill Gates in the making
    [Chorus: Beyoncé]
    I see it, I want it, I stunt, yellow-bone it
    I dream it, I work hard, I grind 'til I own it
    I twirl on my haters, albino alligators
    El Camino with the seat low, sippin' Cuervo with no chaser
    Sometimes I go off (I go off), I go hard (I go hard)
    Get what's mine (take what's mine), I'm a star (I'm a star)
    Cause I slay (slay), I slay (hey), I slay (okay), I slay (okay)
    All day (okay), I slay (okay), I slay (okay), I slay (okay)
    We gon' slay (slay), gon' slay (okay), we slay (okay), I slay (okay)
    I slay (okay), okay (okay), I slay (okay), okay, okay, okay, okay
    Okay, okay, ladies, now let's get in formation, cause I slay
    Okay, ladies, now let's get in formation, cause I slay
    Prove to me you got some coordination, cause I slay
    Slay trick, or you get eliminated
    [Bridge: Beyoncé]
    Okay, ladies, now let's get in formation, I slay
    Okay, ladies, now let's get in formation
    You know you that bitch when you cause all this conversation
    Always stay gracious, best revenge is your paper
    [Outro]
    Girl, I hear some thunder

    Golly, look at that water, boy, oh lord
    AND NEXT,
     TRENDING ON THE OTHER END OF THE MASS MIND CONTROL SCALE
    COMES THE FOLLOWING ARTICLE.
    BELIEVE IT OR NOT????
    FEBRUARY 10, 2016
    ARE BEYONCE’S ‘FORMATION’ LYRICS ANTI-COP, PRO-BLACK OR JUST PLAIN PERFECT?
    The lyrics and video to Beyonce’s new single “Formation” shouldn’t be surprising to any fans who have been closely following the political leanings of the pop artist and her husband Jay-Z. While the power couple have often tried to keep it quiet, they’ve been huge financial supporters of the Black Lives Matter movement. Last year, activist Dream Hampton revealed that the couple had poured in tens of thousands of dollars in bail money without a second thought when Baltimore and Ferguson protestors were jailed. After those tweets were deleted, he later suggested that they didn’t really want to largely publicize the fact, reported The Guardian.
    That attitude seems to be shifting when peering into the video, performance and lyrics behind Beyonce’s “Formation.” Just as she gained accolades for aligning herself with feminism on her 2013 surprise self-titled album, Beyonce has once again recognized the power of pop and the cult of her own artistry to send a message. This time, it’s about the police violence faced by the black community.

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    I want to thank everyone who made this day so crazy. Lailan Sandra Huen, straight non-stop fire, Carla S Dancer, and Eric Arnold for all their work behind the scenes. Caribelinq Omnimedia, Tacuma King and Ayikwei Scott for carrying the heartbeat and holding down the ‪#‎SoulofOakland‬. Wicah Candy and Gerardo Omar Marin representing the Ohlone, Apache and Mexica... Marvin X Jackmon standing firm for the Black Arts Movement and Business District. Anyka Barber and the Oakland Creative Neighborhoods Coalition for ‪#‎KeepingOaklandCreative‬... Pancho Pescador for motivating the youths. Laura Marshall Arts for showing up and helping. Lungusu Malonga representing for her family and lineage... The East Bay School for Boys representing for the youth - damn they were fired up!! Daniel Zarazua for making this struggle into curriculum for Oakland Unity High School students... Everyone who showed up to support, or donated or signed the petition... And if you couldn't make it, chip in, and got too busy to sign... this is the first step. There are still opportunities to get involved. Like writing your councilperson...
    I want to thank everyone who made this day so crazy. Lailan Sandra Huen, straight non-stop fire, Carla S Dancer, and Eric Arnold for all their work behind the scenes. Caribelinq Omnimedia, Tacuma King and Ayikwei Scott for carrying the heartbeat and holding down the ‪#‎SoulofOakland‬. Wicah Candy and Gerardo Omar Marin representing the Ohlone, Apache and Mexica... Marvin X Jackmon standing firm for the Black Arts Movement and Business District. Anyka Barber and the Oakland Creative Neighborhoods Coalition for ‪#‎KeepingOaklandCreative‬... Pancho Pescador for motivating the youths. Laura Marshall Arts for showing up and helping. Lungusu Malonga representing for her family and lineage... The East Bay School for Boys representing for the youth - damn they were fired up!! Daniel Zarazua for making this struggle into curriculum for Oakland Unity High School students... Everyone who showed up to support, or donated or signed the petition... And if you couldn't make it, chip in, and got too busy to sign... this is the first step. There are still opportunities to get involved. Like writing your councilperson...

    Inline image 1

    Members of the Black Arts Movement Business District planning committee and media team.
    Left to right: Amir C. Clark, Aries Jordan and son Legend, Robert Arnold, Marvin X, 
    Dr. Ayodele Nzinga, Eric Arnold, Ken Johnson, Maiya Newsome-Edgerly, Adam Turner.
    photo Amir Aziz Clark
    postnewsgroup.com

    FYI, the Black Arts Movement Business District planners will meet again on Monday, February 15, 10AM, at the Post News Group office, 405 14th Street, Suite 1215. Black artists and business persons should be there to continue planning the BAMBD.  

     Marvin X interviewed by WURD Talk Radio, Philadelphia, at the Black Power Babies Conversation

    If you missed BAMBD planner Marvin X's interview on Harambee Radio yesterday, he has been asked to continue his discussion of Oakland's BAMBD with Sistah Q, next Thursday, February 18, 5PM Pacific time, 8pm Eastern time. www.harambeeradio.com

    The call in number is: 805-309-0111
    Conference ID number: 840360* [star; not pound]
    Moderator number: 754939

    Next week's Eastbay Express Newspaper will publish a feature story on Oakland's Downtown Plan, including an interview with BAMBD planner Marvin X.


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  • 02/12/16--06:33: Love Poems by Marvin X
  • Marvin X: America's Rumi, Plato, Hafiz, Saadi

      
    Ishmael Reed calls him "Plato teaching on the streets of Oakland." Bob Holman says,  "He is the USA's Rumi!--the wisdom of Saadi, the ecstasy of Hafiz." Rudolph Lewis says, "A master teacher in many fields of thought. One of America's great story tellers. I'd put him ahead of Mark Twain!" James G. Spady writes, "When you listen to Tupac Shakur, E-40, Too Short, Master P or any other rappers out of the Bay Area of Cali, think of Marvin X. He laid the foundation and gave us the language to express black male urban experiences in a lyrical way."

     

    The Rapture or I will go into the city 

    (from the play In the Name of Love, Laney College Theatre, 1981, written, produced and directed by Marvin X, with the assistance of Ayodele Nzinga.



    I will go into the city
    I will find work
    I will find work
    I will remember you country woman
    I will not forget you
    your laugh arguments
    to learn
    it is your way
    let it be
    how can I forget your lips
    enchanting smile
    I will not forget
    we walked in the rain
    it was free and we were free
    we agreed
    best of life is free

    I will go into the city
    I will find work
    but you will be with me country woman
    when those city women come to devour me
    with sweet perfume
    you will be there
    you spirit will protect me

    I will never forget
    how we sipped $1.00 Margaritas
    in the Mexican Cafe in Chinatown

    our ride to the lake
    picnic on the hill
    ranger spotted us in his binoculars
    we did not care
    we were filled
    with the Holy Spirit of Love

    how can I forget
    hours in bed
    children of the love spirit
    one moment
    man and woman one
    discovered missing self
    eternal self
    self of love
    self of joy
    self of happiness realized

    I will go into the city
    I will find work
    I will not forget you country woman

    I will return to claim you
    in the name of Love
    I will claim you
    because you woman
    I will claim you
    you are feeling spirit intelligence
    I will claim you
    you have given yourself to me
    so totally
    I will claim you
    in the name of Allah
    I will claim you
    for the Glory of Allah
    I will claim you.
    --Marvin X
    from Selected Poems by Marvin X, 1979.


    For the Women by Marvin X

    http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-3JtFZfJBI8U/VNl4HHwPNeI/AAAAAAAANF8/vVkwxwoZz44/s1600/FullSizeRender(1).jpgWomen Writers Panel at Black Arts Movement 50th Anniversary Celebration, Laney College, Oakland, Feb. 7, 2015. L to R: Elaine Brown, Halifu Osumare, Judy Juanita, Portia Anderson, Kujichagulia, Aries Jordan. Standing: Marvin X, BAM producer
    photo South Park Kenny Johnson

                                              For the Women




    For the women who bear children
    and nurture them with truth
    for the women who cook and clean
    behind thankless men


     
    for the women who love so hard so true so pure
    for the women with faith in God and men
    for the women alone with beer and rum
    for the women searching for a man at the club, college, church, party
    for the women independent of men
    for the women searching their souls
    for the women who do drugs and freak
    for the women who love only women
    for the women who play and run and never show
    for the women who rise in revolt in hand with men
    who say never, never, never again
    for the women who suffer abuse and cry for justice
    for the women happy and free of maternal madness
    for the women who study and write


     
    for the women who sell their love to starving men
    for the women who love to make love and be loved by men
    for the women of Africa who work so hard
    for the women of America who suffer the master
    for the women who turn to God in prayer and patience


     
    for the women who are mothers of children and mothers of men
    for the women who suffer inflation, recession, abortion, rejection
    for the women who understand the rituals of men and women
    for the women who share
    for the women who are greedy
    for the women with power


     
    for the women with nothing
    for the women locked down
    for the women down town
    for the women who break horses
    for the women in the fields
    for the women who rob banks
    for the women who kill
    for the women of history
    for the women of now
    I salute you
    A Man.
    --Marvin X


    I Don't Want to Know Yo Name


    I don't want to know nothin bout ya
    don't tell me yo name
    don't ask me shit
    don't tell me shit
    don't tell me yo name
    don't want nothin from you
    no head
    no pussy
    no ass hole
    no kiss
    no hug
    no smile
    no frown
    just take yo sick ass down the street
    be a pleasure to somebody else
    spare me
    let me stay in the no stress zone
    take your lies
    fake hair
    fake eyes
    fake lips
    fake hips
    fake pussy
    fake ass
    fake mind
    and let the door kiss yo black ass.
    love you madly,
    --Marvin X


     I Release You

    You said release you
    I chant I release you
    three times
    then you called
    emergency
    save your nephew
    boyz in the hood want his head
    gave him refuge in the mountains
    manhood training
    labor of love for you and him
    he is you and you are him
    my life is saving youth
    what is revolution except saving
    the next generation
    from getting caught riding dirty
    brothers marked for extinction
    no use for them
    except
    caged
    enslaved
    ignorant
    no thinkers wanted
    freedom fighters
    conscious poets and rappers
    I did my job
    can I get a little love
    hug a kiss
    no matter you have someone new
    We feed you for Allah’s pleasure only
    we desire neither reward nor thanks, Al Qur’an.
    marvin x
    4.3.07


    The Funny Thing is I Already Knew

    I see you coming toward me
    wind surrounds you
    swirling swirling
    a dance of dervishes in your stride
    wind blows you to me
    arms open wide
    enfold  greatness of your spirit
    I am here at your pleasure
    do with me as you wish
    no abuse please.
    I have no fear of this
    I know you already know this.

    Ah, the air is so fresh
    we must go to the ocean
    walk the shore
    barefoot in the sand as the tide comes in
    holding hands in the wind
    the dervish dance and swirl.
    --Marvin X
    4/9/11

    Wish I Could Fly Like a Hawk

     

    Wish I could fly like a hawk
    just soar above earth
    silent
    gliding smooth
    no noise
    silent
    observing all
    madness below
    rats scurrying
    snakes in the grass
    wish I could fly like a hawk
    sometimes in motion still
    wings frozen in flight
    yet moving
    wish I could be hawk
    above the madness of it all
    the meaningless chatter
    cell phone psychosis
    talking loud saying nothing
    why are you breathing
    jogging
    without meaning purpose
    no mission beyond nothingness
    absorbing air from the meaningful
    who subscribe to justice
    let me fly above the living dead
    let me soar
    let me dream
    imagine
    another time and place
    another space
    this cannot be the end game
    the hail marry
    let me soar above it all
    wings spread wide
    let me glide
    ah, the air is fresh up here
    did I make it to heaven
    did I escape hell
    come with me
    do not be afraid
    the night is young
    let us fly into the moon
    see the crescent
    so beautiful
    let us fly into the friendly sky
    wings spread wide
    we are strong and mighty
    the hawk.
    --Marvin X
    10/10/10

    Oh, Mighty Kora


    I Cannot Hide from Kora
    Oh, Mighty Kora
    you tear the heart apart
    soul from mind
    ten thousand years 
    seeps into a soul lost in time
    Oh, Kora
    time lost regained
    sounds set centuries ago
    no improvisation no jazz
    myth/ritual set for infinity
    voices heard
    message to the king
    from the king
    griot sings 
    king listens obeys sound of kora
    submit or die
    heart music cannot lie
    sound of nights on the River Senegal
    thousand warriors dance
    holy stomp of a thousand women
    breasts shaking in the sun
    take me home take me home Kora
    I am not bound for this wilderness
    dungeon of darkness
    how was I taken from my holy land
    cast into hell with devils of the worse kind
    naked devoid of my holy tongue
    my holy mind soul

    I speak the language of bastards
    men of ill repute
    pirates, kidnappers rapists
    these are not men the shell of human kind
    plunder for illusions
    no joy in their ritual
    no happiness  no peace
    I am weary  in a strange land
    O Kora, take me back to the Senegal and Niger
    Let me hear you in the day in the night
    of ancient times
    rhythms of ancestors
    let me be at peace
    this is not my world
    no matter how I try
    I am naked in the wind
    take me home, take me home kora
    let the whirlwind take me 
    to the womb of my Mother
    let me dwell in my Father's House.
    --Marvin X
    6/17/10

     
    A Poem for Unresolved Grief
    When thy lover has gone to eternity
    When touch is no more 

    no feel in the night in the day
    no smile walk
    sweetness of body
    kissing of lips breasts thighs
    When thy lover has gone
    A day we never imagine

    love blinds 
    the day came like a cloud of thunder rain
    down upon head
    drowning us in sorrow the worse kind
    We cannot walk 
    listen each day
    her voice message 
    til we are taken away
    want to hear for the last time
    voice of love
    For all the joy shared
    blending two into one
    thinking two into one
    When thy lover has gone
    We are worse than dead
    yet alive to suffer pain no one can know
    Who has never loved
    true love we say we want but never get
    we have lived what few ever know
    touch feel constant smile
    When thy lover has gone
    earth opens for the mate as well
    no tears enough
    No silent moments to get over matters 
    confined in the prison of life
    wish to leave for other worlds
    to see if we can meet again
    one so kind so true
    life keeps us here bound like slave to master
    we yearn for paradise
    life is love and love has gone
    desire is great pain a mountain
    We visit familiar places but are lost
    cannot find the way home
    We call a friend to pick us up
    take us home
    there we sit in stupor
    thinking of days joy ruled our world
    joy never to return.
    Lord help us through day night
    It hurts to breathe 
    think
    a picture of our lover
    We try night consumes us and we sleep
    tomorrow will be a better day.
    II
    To heal the missing part of you
    To feel again the love of yesterday
    To realize what is gone cannot return
    Flesh is frail
    Spirit lives
    In the day night
    challenge the task
    know we are spirit
    Of the Great Spirit
    We flow with the flow
    Not the flesh,
    body vessel
    Never put faith in flesh
    Enjoy the moment
    seconds of the day
    Romantic hours of night
    physical shall pass
    Then what shall we do
    confounded
    Perplexed
    depressed
    Stuck against the wall
    a frog on a lily pad
    Flow in the flow of the Great River
    Sail down the Nile Niger Congo
    Do not drown
    reality is transitory
    Except the metaphysical 
    macro cosmic truth inside of you
    Love continues into the ancestor tree
    Beyond pain sorrow lost
    Tears in the night
    Love can be found again
    If we try if we stand
    As Rumi taught
    reeds in the reed bed stand alone
    Yet all together
    The reed flute is a song of mourning
    A yearning to return
    Through the door of no return
    flute plays the song of joy
    A communal chant in the sun
    Sing
    world will bless you
    Praise you sing
    your song of sorrow is gone
    healing complete
    Live again and love
    Reach touch somebody
    Breathe out the pain
    Exhale the misery
    Love is in the air 
    It blows your way
    Listen to the wind
    Listen to the sound of your flute.
    --M
    12/22/07


    We're In Love, But You Don't Know Me
    You don't know me
    you had a chance to know me
    before we made love
    you had a chance to know my mind
    understand my fears
    learn about issues
    help me heal some things
    but you wanted to make love
    so you don't know me
    we made love
    but you don't know me
    don't have a clue
    think I'm a good d
    or some good tight p
    but you don't know me
    and never will now
    because you wanted to make love
    you wanted to get a nut
    we didn't even talk much
    a little bit leading up to sex
    I went along
    I was horny too
    but you don't know me
    and I don't know you
    now we never will
    we blew it forever
    because we made love
    too fast too quick too soon
    now you think you own me
    I can't breathe
    can't talk on the phone to friends
    because we made love
    because I gave you some d
    you gave me some p
    now I'm no longer human
    I'm your love slave you my slave
    we're in love
    but you don't know me
    we gonna get married
    but you don't know me
    we're gonna have children
    but you don't know me
    you're gonna beat my ass
    but you don't know me
    you're going to jail
    but you don't know me
    we're getting a divorce
    but you don't know me
    now we're friends
    "Just Friends" Charlie Parker tune
    But you don't know me
    and never will. 







     
    Emory Douglas reception at the Joyce Gordon Gallery, 14th and Franklin ...


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    Marvin X and Oakland Symphony Conductor Michael Morgan
    photo Aries Jordan

    Marvin X attended the Oakland Symphony's concert Notes from Vietnam Friday evening at the elegant Paramount Theatre, at the invitation of his adviser Rt. Col. Conway Jones, Jr., a board member of the Oakland Symphony, who wanted Marvin X to connect with Conductor Micheal Morgan, since Michael is planning a concert in honor of the 50th Anniversary of the Black Panther Party, founded in Oakland, Ca, 1966.


    It was a most beautiful concert featuring traditional Vietnamese music in harmony with the Oakland Symphony's orchestra, conducted by Maestro Micheal Morgan.

     Vanessa was the hit with her haunting vocals and performance on traditional Vietnamese instruments backed by the Oakland Symphony Orchestra, including Vietnamese high school students . We think Vanessa stole the show!

    Rt. Col. Conway Jones, Jr. and Marvin X 
    photo Aries Jordan

    Rt. Col. Conway Jones,Jr., Vietnam veteran, encouraged the Vietnamese businessman David Duong to support the Oakland Symphony. Mr. Duong said, "The Notes from Vietnam concert will provide the audience with a view of my country, Vietnam, through the lens of symphonic music. Music is a great equalizer among people and cultures. It is essential to our vibrant Oakland community. Saigon was my home, but now my heart is here in Oakland." 

    Left to right: Lynette McElhaney, President of the Oakland City Council, President of the Oakland Symphony Board and David Duong, Vietnamese businessman who supported the production of Notes from Vietnam, at the encouragement of Rt. Col. Conway Jones, Jr.
    photo Aries Jordan

    When Conway informed Marvin that Michael was planning a concert honoring the 50th Anniversary of the Black Panther Party, Marvin told Conway he'd like to read with the Oakland Symphony since key members of the BPP were his associates and he's written about his relationship with them, including an off-Broadway play co-written by Ed Bullins, Salaam, Huey Newton, Salaam, produced by Woody King's  New Federal Theatre in New York. Marvin's play One Day in the Life, includes the scene of his last meeting with Huey Newton in a West Oakland Crack house.



    After the Notes from Vietnam concert, Marvin and Michael talked briefly about his possible reading with symphony. The conductor said he is planning a concert for Indigenous Americans and the LGBT community and the Black Panther Party concert is part of his plans. He and Marvin will be in conversation on the BPP concert, especially since co-founder Huey P. Newton said, "Marvin X was my teacher. Many of our comrades came through his Black Arts Theatre, e.g., Bobby Seale, Eldridge Cleaver, Emory Douglas, Samual Napier, et al."

    ... streetz has the scoop this year marks the 50th anniversary of the

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  • 02/13/16--17:31: Gaddafi helped end Apartheid



  • Editorial Comment:
    This article was first published on Libya 360° in 2011.  Following the death of Nelson Mandela and in light of the ongoing struggle in Libya, it is an appropriate time to read these words again.

    The Lies Behind The West’s War On Libya

    Libyan Leader                                     Muammar al-Qaddafi
    It was Gaddafi’s Libya that offered all of Africa its first revolution in modern times – connecting the entire continent by telephone, television, radio broadcasting and several other technological applications such as telemedicine and distance teaching. And thanks to the WMAX radio bridge, a low cost connection was made available across the continent, including in rural areas.
     
    It began in 1992, when 45 African nations established RASCOM (Regional African Satellite Communication Organization) so that Africa would have its own satellite and slash communication costs in the continent. This was a time when phone calls to and from Africa were the most expensive in the world because of the annual US$500 million fee pocketed by Europe for the use of its satellites like Intelsat for phone conversations, including those within the same country.
     
    An African satellite only cost a onetime payment of US$400 million and the continent no longer had to pay a US$500 million annual lease. Which banker wouldn’t finance such a project? But the problem remained – how can slaves, seeking to free themselves from their master’s exploitation ask the master’s help to achieve that freedom? Not surprisingly, the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, the USA, Europe only made vague promises for 14 years. Gaddafi put an end to these futile pleas to the western ‘benefactors’ with their exorbitant interest rates. The Libyan guide put US$300 million on the table; the African Development Bank added US$50 million more and the West African Development Bank a further US$27 million – and that’s how Africa got its first communications satellite on 26 December 2007.
     
    China and Russia followed suit and shared their technology and helped launch satellites for South Africa, Nigeria, Angola, Algeria and a second African satellite was launched in July 2010. The first totally indigenously built satellite and manufactured on African soil, in Algeria, is set for 2020. This satellite is aimed at competing with the best in the world, but at ten times less the cost, a real challenge.
     
    This is how a symbolic gesture of a mere US$300 million changed the life of an entire continent. Gaddafi’s Libya cost the West, not just depriving it of US$500 million per year but the billions of dollars in debt and interest that the initial loan would generate for years to come and in an exponential manner, thereby helping maintain an occult system in order to plunder the continent.
     
    African Monetary Fund, African Central Bank, African Investment Bank
     
    The US$30 billion frozen by Mr Obama belong to the Libyan Central Bank and had been earmarked as the Libyan contribution to three key projects which would add the finishing touches to the African federation – the African Investment Bank in Sirte, Libya, the establishment in 2011 of the African Monetary Fund to be based in Yaounde with a US$42 billion capital fund and the Abuja-based African Central Bank in Nigeria which when it starts printing African money will ring the death knell for the CFA franc through which Paris has been able to maintain its hold on some African countries for the last fifty years. It is easy to understand the French wrath against Gaddafi.
     
    The African Monetary Fund is expected to totally supplant the African activities of the International Monetary Fund which, with only US$25 billion, was able to bring an entire continent to its knees and make it swallow questionable privatisation like forcing African countries to move from public to private monopolies. No surprise then that on 16-17 December 2010, the Africans unanimously rejected attempts by Western countries to join the African Monetary Fund, saying it was open only to African nations.
     
    It is increasingly obvious that after Libya, the western coalition will go after Algeria, because apart from its huge energy resources, the country has cash reserves of around €150 billion. This is what lures the countries that are bombing Libya and they all have one thing in common – they are practically bankrupt. The USA alone, has a staggering debt of $US14,000 billion, France, Great Britain and Italy each have a US$2,000 billion public deficit compared to less than US$400 billion in public debt for 46 African countries combined.
     
    Inciting spurious wars in Africa in the hope that this will revitalise their economies which are sinking ever more into the doldrums will ultimately hasten the western decline which actually began in 1884 during the notorious Berlin Conference. As the American economist Adam Smith predicted in 1865 when he publicly backed Abraham Lincoln for the abolition of slavery, ‘the economy of any country which relies on the slavery of blacks is destined to descend into hell the day those countries awaken’.
     
    Regional Unity as an Obstacle to the Creation of a United States of Africa
     
    To destabilise and destroy the African union which was veering dangerously (for the West) towards a United States of Africa under the guiding hand of Gaddafi, the European Union first tried, unsuccessfully, to create the Union for the Mediterranean (UPM). North Africa somehow had to be cut off from the rest of Africa, using the old tired racist clichés of the 18th and 19th centuries ,which claimed that Africans of Arab origin were more evolved and civilised than the rest of the continent. This failed because Gaddafi refused to buy into it. He soon understood what game was being played when only a handful of African countries were invited to join the Mediterranean grouping without informing the African Union but inviting all 27 members of the European Union.
     
    Without the driving force behind the African Federation, the UPM failed even before it began, still-born with Sarkozy as president and Mubarak as vice president. The French foreign minister, Alain Juppe is now attempting to re-launch the idea, banking no doubt on the fall of Gaddafi. What African leaders fail to understand is that as long as the European Union continues to finance the African Union, the status quo will remain, because no real independence. This is why the European Union has encouraged and financed regional groupings in Africa.
     
    It is obvious that the West African Economic Community (ECOWAS), which has an embassy in Brussels and depends for the bulk of its funding on the European Union, is a vociferous opponent to the African federation. That’s why Lincoln fought in the US war of secession because the moment a group of countries come together in a regional political organisation, it weakens the main group. That is what Europe wanted and the Africans have never understood the game plan, creating a plethora of regional groupings, COMESA, UDEAC, SADC, and the Great Maghreb which never saw the light of day thanks to Gaddafi who understood what was happening.
    mandela-gaddafi

    Gaddafi, the African Who Cleansed the Continent from the Humiliation of Apartheid

    For most Africans, Gaddafi is a generous man, a humanist, known for his unselfish support for the struggle against the racist regime in South Africa. If he had been an egotist, he wouldn’t have risked the wrath of the West to help the ANC both militarily and financially in the fight against apartheid. This was why Mandela, soon after his release from 27 years in jail, decided to break the UN embargo and travel to Libya on 23 October 1997. For five long years, no plane could touch down in Libya because of the embargo. One needed to take a plane to the Tunisian city of Jerba and continue by road for five hours to reach Ben Gardane, cross the border and continue on a desert road for three hours before reaching Tripoli. The other solution was to go through Malta, and take a night ferry on ill-maintained boats to the Libyan coast. A hellish journey for a whole people, simply to punish one man.
     
    Mandela didn’t mince his words when the former US president Bill Clinton said the visit was an ‘unwelcome’ one – ‘No country can claim to be the policeman of the world and no state can dictate to another what it should do’. He added – ‘Those that yesterday were friends of our enemies have the gall today to tell me not to visit my brother Gaddafi, they are advising us to be ungrateful and forget our friends of the past.’
     
    Indeed, the West still considered the South African racists to be their brothers who needed to be protected. That’s why the members of the ANC, including Nelson Mandela, were considered to be dangerous terrorists. It was only on 2 July 2008, that the US Congress finally voted a law to remove the name of Nelson Mandela and his ANC comrades from their black list, not because they realised how stupid that list was but because they wanted to mark Mandela’s 90th birthday. If the West was truly sorry for its past support for Mandela’s enemies and really sincere when they name streets and places after him, how can they continue to wage war against someone who helped Mandela and his people to be victorious, Gaddafi?
     
    Are Those Who Want to Export Democracy Themselves Democrats?
     
    And what if Gaddafi’s Libya were more democratic than the USA, France, Britain and other countries waging war to export democracy to Libya? On 19 March 2003, President George Bush began bombing Iraq under the pretext of bringing democracy. On 19 March 2011, exactly eight years later to the day, it was the French president’s turn to rain down bombs over Libya, once again claiming it was to bring democracy. Nobel peace prize-winner and US President Obama says unleashing cruise missiles from submarines is to oust the dictator and introduce democracy.
     
    The question that anyone with even minimum intelligence cannot help asking is the following: Are countries like France, England, the USA, Italy, Norway, Denmark, Poland who defend their right to bomb Libya on the strength of their self proclaimed democratic status really democratic? If yes, are they more democratic than Gaddafi’s Libya? The answer in fact is a resounding NO, for the plain and simple reason that democracy doesn’t exist. This isn’t a personal opinion, but a quote from someone whose native town Geneva, hosts the bulk of UN institutions. The quote is from Jean Jacques Rousseau, born in Geneva in 1712 and who writes in chapter four of the third book of the famous Social Contract that ‘there never was a true democracy and there never will be.’
     
    Rousseau sets out the following four conditions for a country to be labelled a democracy and according to these Gaddafi’s Libya is far more democratic than the USA, France and the others claiming to export democracy:
     
    1. The State: The bigger a country, the less democratic it can be. According to Rousseau, the state has to be extremely small so that people can come together and know each other. Before asking people to vote, one must ensure that everybody knows everyone else, otherwise voting will be an act without any democratic basis, a simulacrum of democracy to elect a dictator.
     
    The Libyan state is based on a system of tribal allegiances, which by definition group people together in small entities. The democratic spirit is much more present in a tribe, a village than in a big country, simply because people know each other, share a common life rhythm which involves a kind of self-regulation or even self-censorship in that the reactions and counter reactions of other members impacts on the group.
     
    From this perspective, it would appear that Libya fits Rousseau’s conditions better than the USA, France and Great Britain, all highly urbanised societies where most neighbours don’t even say hello to each other and therefore don’t know each other even if they have lived side by side for twenty years. These countries leapfrogged leaped into the next stage – ‘the vote’ – which has been cleverly sanctified to obfuscate the fact that voting on the future of the country is useless if the voter doesn’t know the other citizens. This has been pushed to ridiculous limits with voting rights being given to people living abroad. Communicating with and amongst each other is a precondition for any democratic debate before an election.
     
    2. Simplicity in customs and behavioural patterns are also essential if one is to avoid spending the bulk of the time debating legal and judicial procedures in order to deal with the multitude of conflicts of interest inevitable in a large and complex society. Western countries define themselves as civilised nations with a more complex social structure whereas Libya is described as a primitive country with a simple set of customs. This aspect too indicates that Libya responds better to Rousseau’s democratic criteria than all those trying to give lessons in democracy. Conflicts in complex societies are most often won by those with more power, which is why the rich manage to avoid prison because they can afford to hire top lawyers and instead arrange for state repression to be directed against someone one who stole a banana in a supermarket rather than a financial criminal who ruined a bank. In the city of New York for example where 75 per cent of the population is white, 80 per cent of management posts are occupied by whites who make up only 20 per cent of incarcerated people.
     
    3. Equality in status and wealth: A look at the Forbes 2010 list shows who the richest people in each of the countries currently bombing Libya are and the difference between them and those who earn the lowest salaries in those nations; a similar exercise on Libya will reveal that in terms of wealth distribution, Libya has much more to teach than those fighting it now, and not the contrary. So here too, using Rousseau’s criteria, Libya is more democratic than the nations pompously pretending to bring democracy. In the USA, 5 per cent of the population owns 60 per cent of the national wealth, making it the most unequal and unbalanced society in the world.
     
    4. No luxuries: according to Rousseau there can’t be any luxury if there is to be democracy. Luxury, he says, makes wealth a necessity which then becomes a virtue in itself, it, and not the welfare of the people becomes the goal to be reached at all cost, ‘Luxury corrupts both the rich and the poor, the one through possession and the other through envy; it makes the nation soft and prey to vanity; it distances people from the State and enslaves them, making them a slave to opinion.’
     
    Is there more luxury in France than in Libya? The reports on employees committing suicide because of stressful working conditions even in public or semi-public companies, all in the name of maximising profit for a minority and keeping them in luxury, happen in the West, not in Libya.
    The American sociologist C. Wright Mills wrote in 1956 that American democracy was a ‘dictatorship of the elite’. According to Mills, the USA is not a democracy because it is money that talks during elections and not the people. The results of each election are the expression of the voice of money and not the voice of the people. After Bush senior and Bush junior, they are already talking about a younger Bush for the 2012 Republican primaries. Moreover, as Max Weber pointed out, since political power is dependent on the bureaucracy, the US has 43 million bureaucrats and military personnel who effectively rule the country but without being elected and are not accountable to the people for their actions. One person (a rich one) is elected, but the real power lies with the caste of the wealthy who then get nominated to be ambassadors, generals, etc.
     
    How many people in these self-proclaimed democracies know that Peru’s constitution prohibits an outgoing president from seeking a second consecutive mandate? How many know that in Guatemala, not only can an outgoing president not seek re-election to the same post, no one from that person’s family can aspire to the top job either? Or that Rwanda is the only country in the world that has 56 per cent female parliamentarians? How many people know that in the 2007 CIA index, four of the world’s best-governed countries are African? That the top prize goes to Equatorial Guinea whose public debt represents only 1.14 per cent of GDP?
     
    Rousseau maintains that civil wars, revolts and rebellions are the ingredients of the beginning of democracy. Because democracy is not an end, but a permanent process of the reaffirmation of the natural rights of human beings which in countries all over the world (without exception) are trampled upon by a handful of men and women who have hijacked the power of the people to perpetuate their supremacy. There are here and there groups of people who have usurped the term ‘democracy’ – instead of it being an ideal towards which one strives it has become a label to be appropriated or a slogan which is used by people who can shout louder than others. If a country is calm, like France or the USA, that is to say without any rebellions, it only means, from Rousseau’s perspective, that the dictatorial system is sufficiently repressive to pre-empt any revolt.
     
    It wouldn’t be a bad thing if the Libyans revolted. What is bad is to affirm that people stoically accept a system that represses them all over the world without reacting. And Rousseau concludes: ‘Malo periculosam libertatem quam quietum servitium – translation – If gods were people, they would govern themselves democratically. Such a perfect government is not applicable to human beings.’ To claim that one is killing Libyans for their own good is a hoax.
     
    What Lessons for Africa?
     
    After 500 years of a profoundly unequal relationship with the West, it is clear that we don’t have the same criteria of what is good and bad. We have deeply divergent interests. How can one not deplore the ‘yes’ votes from three sub-Saharan countries (Nigeria, South Africa and Gabon) for resolution 1973 that inaugurated the latest form of colonisation baptised ‘the protection of peoples’, which legitimises the racist theories that have informed Europeans since the 18th century and according to which North Africa has nothing to do with sub-Saharan Africa, that North Africa is more evolved, cultivated and civilised than the rest of Africa?
     
    It is as if Tunisia, Egypt, Libya and Algeria were not part of Africa, Even the United Nations seems to ignore the role of the African Union in the affairs of member states. The aim is to isolate sub Saharan African countries to better isolate and control them. Indeed, Algeria (US$16 billion) and Libya (US$10 billion ) together contribute 62 per cent of the US$42 billion which constitute the capital of the African Monetary Fund (AMF). The biggest and most populous country in sub Saharan Africa, Nigeria, followed by South Africa are far behind with only 3 billion dollars each.
     
    It is disconcerting to say the least that for the first time in the history of the United Nations, war has been declared against a people without having explored the slightest possibility of a peaceful solution to the crisis. Does Africa really belong anymore to this organisation? Nigeria and South Africa are prepared to vote ‘Yes’ to everything the West asks because they naively believe the vague promises of a permanent seat at the Security Council with similar veto rights. They both forget that France has no power to offer anything. If it did, Mitterand would have long done the needful for Helmut Kohl’s Germany.
     
    A reform of the United Nations is not on the agenda. The only way to make a point is to use the Chinese method – all 50 African nations should quit the United Nations and only return if their longstanding demand is finally met, a seat for the entire African federation or nothing. This non-violent method is the only weapon of justice available to the poor and weak that we are. We should simply quit the United Nations because this organisation, by its very structure and hierarchy, is at the service of the most powerful.
     
    We should leave the United Nations to register our rejection of a worldview based on the annihilation of those who are weaker. They are free to continue as before but at least we will not be party to it and say we agree when we were never asked for our opinion. And even when we expressed our point of view, like we did on Saturday 19 March in Nouakchott, when we opposed the military action, our opinion was simply ignored and the bombs started falling on the African people.
     
    Today’s events are reminiscent of what happened with China in the past. Today, one recognises the Ouattara government, the rebel government in Libya, like one did at the end of the Second World War with China. The so-called international community chose Taiwan to be the sole representative of the Chinese people instead of Mao’s China. It took 26 years when on 25 October 1971, for the UN to pass resolution 2758 which all Africans should read to put an end to human folly. China was admitted and on its terms – it refused to be a member if it didn’t have a veto right. When the demand was met and the resolution tabled, it still took a year for the Chinese foreign minister to respond in writing to the UN Secretary General on 29 September 1972, a letter which didn’t say yes or thank you but spelt out guarantees required for China’s dignity to be respected.
     
    What does Africa hope to achieve from the United Nations without playing hard ball? We saw how in Cote d’Ivoire a UN bureaucrat considers himself to be above the constitution of the country. We entered this organisation by agreeing to be slaves and to believe that we will be invited to dine at the same table and eat from plates we ourselves washed is not just credulous, it is stupid.
     
    When the African Union endorsed Ouattara’s victory and glossed over contrary reports from its own electoral observers simply to please our former masters, how can we expect to be respected? When South African president Zuma declares that Ouattara hasn’t won the elections and then says the exact opposite during a trip to Paris, one is entitled to question the credibility of these leaders who claim to represent and speak on behalf of a billion Africans.
     
    Africa’s strength and real freedom will only come if it can take properly thought out actions and assume the consequences. Dignity and respect come with a price tag. Are we prepared to pay it? Otherwise, our place is in the kitchen and in the toilets in order to make others comfortable.

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    <b>KPOO</b> “On the Spot” host Harrison Chastang (harrison@<b>kpoo</b>.com ...
    KPOO Radio will rebroadcast the dynamic interview Sistah Q of Harambee Radio.com conducted with Black Arts Movement co-founder Marvin X, now a planner of the Black Arts Movement Business District, downtown Oakland CA. The Terry Collins Show will replay the interview Tuesday, February 16, 11AM.

    Terry Collins and Willie Ratcliff, the OGs of <b>KPOO</b> and the Bay View ...
    Terry Collins, GM of KPOO Radio SF

    Harambee Radio's Sistah Q will continue her conversation with the poet on Thursday, February 18, 5pm Pacific Time, 8pm, Eastern Time. Below is the link to Sistah Q's February 11 interview.
    Hightail

    A file has been sent to you

    from optimus0817@gmail.com via Hightail.
    Peace, Brothah Marvin X...

    I think this link is what you were requesting:

    https://www.hightail.com/download/ZWJWR0lUays0b0FYRHNUQw

    The .mp3 is attached.

    Looking forward to part 2 on next Thursday 18 February at 8 pm eastern time.

    Peace...
    Sistah Q
    File Icon 2016-02-11 Sistah Q & Marvin X.mp3 Download
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    Black Bird Press News & Review: From the Archives of Nefertiti El Muhajir

    Marvin X and Daughter Nefertiti
    at Oakland's Laney College
    Black Arts Movement 50th Anniversary Celebration
    photo Ken Johnson

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    Kathleen cleaver ex leader pantere nere - dago fotogallery
     Black Panther Kathleen Cleaver

    The Liberation Film Series presented “Kathleen Cleaver& The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution” - Q & A Session:

    Featuring “… Kathleen Neal Cleaver, Senior Lecturer and Research Fellow at Emory University School of Law and former Communications Secretary of the Black Panther Party” with Dr. Errol Henderson, as moderator. ... mbrhttp://livestream.com/accounts/2710797/events/4806971/videos/112282495?origin=digest&mixpanel_id=13c975ae1271044-09c87240cfcd97-7864554c-c0000-13c975ae136fc9&acc_id=7570118&med

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  • 02/14/16--21:40: What is Love by Marvin X



  • h

    What is Love


    What is love
    only kisses hugs
    what is love
    only meetings of minds
    what about times
    when minds
    do not meet

    Celeste Bateman & Associates | Artists & Speakers from the African ...

    is love
    not present
    in the air
    in the blood
    of loving souls
    too ignorant
    to know the test
    of love
    the many ways
    it strives to be and not be
    yet
    is always and forever
    not always tender
    sometimes
    rough and sharp
    like a razor
    cutting to the heart



    love is pain
    we take to grow
    be strong again
    tears in the night
    alone again
    we find ourselves
    wondering if love
    was even real
    yet it was
    if we see
    if we look
    beyond romantic notions
    of everything is cool
    always with love
    but we know
    the blues of love
    when we miss the words
    from lips so tender with truth
    but we miss them
    in haste to be the authority on love
    yet love has been around
    since eternity
    and will stay
    when lovers have gone away
    it will stay
    in spite of all the tears
    fights
    verbal bouts
    come backs
    gimme my keys
    why don't you call
    don't you still care
    why did you go
    do you really love her
    or really love him
    after all the time we shared
    how could you do this to me
    after all I did for you in the night
    what is love
    sometimes we must enjoy the hurt pain
    to grow
    be wise again
    do it better next time
    correct mistakes
    try again this time
    with God
    in the center of things
    but try
    for love is precious
    time is short
    life must be lived
    with joy
    somehow
    through it all
    let joy arise
    take control of love.
    --Marvin X
    8/3/04
     from Land of My Daughters, poems, Marvin X, Black Bird Press, 2005

    <b>Julia</b> Reed <b>Hare</b> | The HistoryMakers




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    Sometimes it is simple filth that breeds disease. The hoax mongers spread fear causing depopulation by press conference. It is the best of Yacubian mythology: a black and black must not mate, only black and brown, then brown and yellow, then yellow and white, thus creating the white devil through genetic engineering. If a black and black mate and the woman gets pregnant, the nurse must kill the baby and inform the mother there was a birth defect and it was necessary to kill the baby, or maybe tell the mother the baby will be born with a small head so she must abort. This is the classic Yacubian mythology, utilizing three workers: doctor, nurse and undertaker.

    coisa para facebook: imagens zika


    Again, often it is simply filthy water or pesticide rather than a virus. For sure, water is the leading culprit. Nothing can come from filthy water except disease. But Dr. Yacub is also busy in his bio tech lab engineering mosquitoes  carrying the virus, then another strain to neutralize the virus carrying agent. But clean the water, Stupid, mosquitoes breed in filthy water.

    Conspiracy Theorists Think Zika Is a Biological Weapon

    It is a scam, again, in the classic Yacubian method of population control by spreading fear and misinformation. Don't believe the hype!

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:
    For other people of the same name, see Yakub.
    Yakub (sometimes spelled Yacub or Yakob) is, according to the Nation of Islam (NOI), a black scientist who lived "6,600 years ago" and was responsible for creating the white race to be a "race of devils". He is said to have done this through a form of selective breeding referred to as "grafting", while living on the island of Patmos.
    The Nation of Islam theology claims that Yakub is the biblicalJacob. Mainstream Sunni and Shia Muslims do not have this belief, or anything similar to it. The story has caused disputes within the NOI during its history. Under its current leader Louis Farrakhan, the NOI continues to assert that the story of Yakub is true, stating that modern science is consistent with it.

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     https://s.yimg.com/fz/api/res/1.2/r2mzYWKxXZYGVNw1N0nUSA--/YXBwaWQ9c3JjaGRkO2g9NzU1O3E9OTU7dz01MDk-/http://reelblack.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/black_panthers_vanguard_of_the_revolution.jpg

    Tuesday, Feb. 16, Catch the indefatigable, peripatetic poet on KQED TV, Channel 9, 9PM: Stanley Nelson's The Black Panthers, Vanguard of the Revolution. Excellent documentary on the Black Panther Party on its 50th Anniversary.

     https://s.yimg.com/fz/api/res/1.2/z.ek97MFbEV_F0QvfZI0tw--/YXBwaWQ9c3JjaGRkO2g9NzMwO3E9OTU7dz0xMjk2/http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/sites/default/files/2015/01/Black_Panthers_Vanguard_of_the_Revolution_still.jpg



     Marvin X interviewed by WURD Talk Radio, Philadelphia, at Black Power Babies Conversation,
    produced by Muhammida El Muhajir.
    <b>KPOO</b> “On the Spot” host Harrison Chastang (harrison@<b>kpoo</b>.com ...




    Terry Collins and Willie Ratcliff, the OGs of <b>KPOO</b> and the Bay View ...
    Terry Collins, GM of KPOO Radio SF

    February 16, Tuesday, 11PM, KPOO Radio, 89.5FM, The Spirit of Joe Rudolph show rebroadcasts Sistah Q's interview of Marvin X on Harambee Radio.
    Thursday, Feb. 18, Eastbay Express Newspaper feature story on the Downtown Oakland Plan, includes interview of Marvin X as co-planner of the Black Arts Movement Business District.

    Thursday, Feb. 18, Sistah Q of Harambee Radio continues her conversation with the Black Arts Movement co-founder, 5PM Pacific time, 8PM Eastern Time.








    Terry Collins and Willie Ratcliff, the OGs of <b>KPOO</b> and the Bay View ...
    Terry Collins, GM of KPOO Radio SF

    Harambee Radio's Sistah Q will continue her conversation with the poet on Thursday, February 18, 5pm Pacific Time, 8pm, Eastern Time.
    Visit The Harambee Radio & Television Network at: http://harambeeradio.ning.com/?xg_source=msg_mes_network
     For Sistah Q interview:
    The call in number is: 805-309-0111
    Conference ID number: 840360* [star; not pound]
    Moderator number: 754939





    Below is the link to Sistah Q's February 11 interview.
    Hightail

    A file has been sent to you

    from optimus0817@gmail.com via Hightail.
    Peace, Brothah Marvin X...

    I think this link is what you were requesting:

    https://www.hightail.com/download/ZWJWR0lUays0b0FYRHNUQw

    The .mp3 is attached.

    Looking forward to part 2 on next Thursday 18 February at 8 pm eastern time.

    Peace...
    Sistah Q
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    ... streetz has the scoop this year marks the 50th anniversary of the



    Black Lives Matter Activist Praises Beyoncé for Super Bowl Black Panther Tribute


    A day after the Super Bowl, people are still parsing over each frame from Beyonce’s halftime performance, trying to glean the messages, both subtle and overt, that made for a stunning display of unapologetic blackness and political activism during one of the most-watched events of the year.

    The halftime show — seen by an estimated 112 million people — is drawing praise from her fans and consternation from critics.

    While Beyonce hasn’t commented on the specifics of the show, and her rep declined comment, the imagery speaks for itself. Beyonce’s dancers donned berets, sported Afros and wore all black, similar to the style of the Black Panther party, founded 50 years ago by Huey P. Newton and Bobby Seale in the Bay area — the location of this year’s Super Bowl. At one point during their routine, the dancers formed an “X” on the field, which some people are taking as a tribute to slain black activist Malcolm X.
    Danny Glover's Black Panthers film is an antidote to Batman and Iron ...
     BPP co-founders Bobby Seale and Huey P. Newton
    Freedom Fighters! We appreciate you, BPP!


    In addition, Beyoncé and her dancers raised a fist to the sky, reminiscent of the black power salutes of the 1960-70s, made popular internationally by Tommie Smith and John Carlos, who raised their fists to the sky after winning gold and bronze at the 1968 Summer Olympics.

    Several people applauded her embracing the history of black activism and of her own identity. Her new song “Formation,” which she sang during her performance, includes the lyrics “I like my baby hair, with baby hair and Afros. I like my negro nose with Jackson Five nostrils.”

    “I think that you’re hard-pressed to find that demonstrative an example of performative blackness on stage, on such a high profile stage,” said Damon Young, editor in chief of the website www.verysmartbrothas.com , on Monday. “Between the dancers coming out dressed as Black Panthers to the lyrics to the song, again … I can’t recall another time you saw that unambiguousness with a performance on a large scale.”

    Melina Abdullah, a Black Lives Matter activist and leader in California, said it’s wonderful that artists like Beyonce “are willing to raise social consciousness and use their artistry to advance social justice.”

    But not everyone appreciated Beyoncé’s performance. Republican Congressman
    Rep. Peter King (R-NY)
    33%
    of New York immediately condemned Beyoncé for her performance, saying on Facebook “her pro-Black Panther and anti-cop video ‘Formation’ and her Super Bowl appearance is just one more example of how acceptable it has become to be anti-police.” (While there were no direct references to police on the Super Bowl field, the video, released Saturday, features a young black child in a hoodie dancing in front of a line of police officers, and graffiti that reads “Stop Shooting Us.”)

    And all of this comes during heightened racial tensions across the country, particularly in regards to allegations of police brutality. Hollywood is grappling with issues of race as well, with Spike Lee, Will Smith and Jada Pinkett Smith planning to skip the Academy Awards after no actors of color received Oscar nominations for a second year in a row.

    Lakeyta Bonnette, a Georgia State University political science professor, said more and more celebrities like Beyonce are moving toward public activism. In 2014, basketball superstar LeBron James and other NBA players wore “I can’t breathe” T-shirts to their basketball games: “I can’t breathe” were the last words of Eric Garner, a black man who died after a physical altercation with police in New York City.

    But some people have complained that Beyonce injected politics into a sports event. On Monday’s Fox & Friends, former New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani slammed her tributes to black activism during the halftime show when performers are “talking to Middle America.”

    “I thought it was really outrageous that she used it as a platform to attack police officers who are the people who protect her and protect us, and keep us alive,” said Giuliani, who said he would have preferred “decent wholesome entertainment.”

    To be fair, it wasn’t just Beyoncé that the 71-year old Giuliani didn’t like. He called the whole halftime show “ridiculous.”

    “I don’t know what the heck it was. A bunch of people bouncing around and all strange things. It was terrible,” he said. “Actually don’t even know why we have this. I mean, this is football.”






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