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A journal dedicated to truth, freedom of speech and radical spiritual consciousness. Our mission is the liberation of men and women from oppression, violence and abuse of any kind, interpersonal, political, religious, economic, psychosexual. We believe as Fidel Castro said, "The weapon of today is not guns but consciousness."

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    I am Othello
    loving Desdemona
    so in love
    Iago will take me out for sure
    but for now
    Desdemona is my queen
    I am the Moor
    who came to Spain 711
    crossing the Strait of Gibraltar
    the Rock of the African Warrior Tarik
    who cross into Spain
    staying a thousand years
    there is no Spain except for the Moors
    Granada Seville Toledo
    the Moors were there
    guiding  savages from darkness of the Middle Ages
    our scholars enabled the European Renaissance
    and yet you never heard of Timbuktu?

    Even now you come to my Academy of da Corner
    downtown Oakland
    you marvel at the tables of consciousness
    confess ignorance asking mercy
    ignorance is no sin
    it is the desire to remain ignorant
    this is sinful.
    --Marvin X
    12/8/13

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    KABUL, Afghanistan — Amid highly public tensions with the United States over a long-term security deal, Afghanistan’s president looked to forge closer ties with neighboring Iran, agreeing in principle to start negotiating an economic and security “pact of friendship,” Afghan officials said.       
     
    During a one-day trip to meet with President Hassan Rouhani of Iran, President Hamid Karzai not only got a chance to reach out to a neighbor, but also to tweak the Western allies he has been at loggerheads with in recent weeks.       
     
    While Mr. Karzai and his staff have repeatedly said the intent is eventually to sign the bilateral security pact with the United States, allowing an American troop presence beyond the 2014 withdrawal deadline, Mr. Karzai has also added conditions before he signs it. Both American and Afghan officials see the chances of a completed deal by year’s end as basically dead, despite a recent vote by an assembly of Afghan leadership figures instructing Mr. Karzai to sign it.
          
    Now, with the deadlock continuing, Mr. Karzai has publicly focused on bolstering regional ties. In addition to the Iran trip, he recently met with Prime Minister Nawaz Shari of Pakistan, and in coming days is to travel to India.
          
    And while he has not explicitly been seeking an endorsement of refusal to sign the American security deal, he still received one on Sunday. President Rouhani, who is in the midst of delicate nuclear negotiations with Western nations, explicitly said he viewed the continuing presence of foreign forces in the region as a danger.
          
    “We are concerned about the tensions arising from the presence of foreign forces in the region and believe that all foreign forces should exit the region and Afghanistan’s security should be ceded to the people of that country,” Mr. Rouhani said.
          
    Mr. Rouhani’s statement was a bit of a departure from the official Iranian line on Afghan deals with the United States. In general, Iranian officials, while expressing discomfort with the American troop presence next door, have stated publicly and repeatedly that Afghanistan is a sovereign country able to sign pacts with any other nation.
          
    In describing the mutual deal that Iran and Afghanistan will now explore, Mr. Karzai’s spokesman, Aimal Faizi, described it as a “pact of friendship and cooperation,” much like understandings that Afghanistan has signed with India, France and Italy.
          
    While such pacts are to some extent symbolic, they provide the basis for more extensive involvement. For instance, India is providing intensive training for Afghan military personnel in counterinsurgency techniques, is training members of the Afghan civil service, and has made room for several thousand Afghan students in its universities.
          
    “This pact will include political, security cooperation and economic development,” Mr. Faizi said.
    Since trade with Iran is still constrained by international sanctions because of the country’s nuclear program, it is unclear what kind of economic cooperation would be possible. And, while the United States gave limited short-term sanction relief to Iran as part of the deal reached last month in Geneva, there was no overall lifting of the sanctions.
          
    The two presidents, as well as the Iranian foreign minister, also discussed problems faced by Afghans in Iran, including peremptory deportations, limits on visas and difficulties obtaining residence permits. Officials said the Iranian leadership agreed to work closely with the Afghan Foreign Ministry to improve the situation.
          
    According to a recent Human Rights Watch report, there at least two million undocumented Afghans in Iran, beyond the 800,000 officially registered. Most are there seeking better economic circumstances, though they often face arbitrary abuse.
          
    With such issues in common, Mr. Karzai’s outreach to Mr. Rouhani seemed at least in part a recognition that the United States and European countries are far away and that Afghanistan, for better or worse, has to deal its powerful neighbors.
          
    “Our relations with Iran will not effect our relations with the United States,” Mr. Faizi said. “We need to enhance our relationships with our neighbors because these are the countries we have our future with.”

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    Over the past several weeks, Kanye West has given fans and critics alike an earful of his philosophical musings. Less than nine years removed from his declaration that “George Bush doesn’t care about Black people” at a charity event for Hurricane Katrina survivors, and four years following his infamous Taylor Swift speech interruption, “I’ma let you finish but…,” at the MTV Music Awards, West is back at it with much more to say.
    The Chi-town rapper admirably tries to tackle the behemoth that is white supremacy, a system organized to maintain global power and influence in the hands of Western European people and their institutions.  Check out these six statements by West about white supremacy that we believe are justified.
    kanye boys clue
    The good ol’ boys club is alive and well = “Man, let me tell you something about George Bush and oil money and Obama and no money. People want to say Obama can’t make these moves or he’s not executing. That’s because he ain’t got those connections…Black people don’t have the same level of connections as Jewish people. Black people don’t have the same connection as oil people.”

    kanye small business
    The glass ceiling is high for Black entrepreneurs = “For you to have done something to the level of the Yeezys and not be able to create more and you cannot – you cannot create that on your own, with no support, with no backing. So when I say, ‘Clean water was only served to the fairer skinned,’ what I’m saying is we’re making products with chitterlings.  T-shirts! That’s the most we can make! T-shirts. We could have our best perspective on T-shirts. But if it’s anything else, your ‘Truman Show’ boat is hitting the wall.”

    Businessman Watching City Skyline
    Institutions, primarily controlled by white males, guarantee personal security =“You know we don’t know nobody that got a nice house. You know we don’t know nobody with paper like that we can go to when we down. You know they can just put us back or put us in a corporation. You know we ain’t in situation. Can you guarantee that your daughter can get a job at this radio station? But if you own this radio station, you could guarantee that. That’s what I’m talking about.”
    Barriers to entry limits long-term wealth = “We don’t got it like that. When I tell you [there are] only seven Black billionaires, look at marginalization; and we feel like we happy because me and [rap artist] Rick Ross got it made, or I got a spread outside, a couple of us, or they put a Black president [in the White House].”
    kanye pimp
    Racial stereotypes are fully embedded in the media to fight against a new image  = “When someone comes up and says something like, ‘I am a god,’ everybody says, ‘Who does he think he is?’ I just told you who I thought I was, a god! I just told you! That’s who I think I am! Would have been better if I had a song that said, ‘I am a nigga?’ or if I had song that said ‘I am a gangsta?’ or if I had song that said ‘I am a pimp?’ All those colors and patinas fit better on a person like me, right? But to say you are a god… Especially, when you got shipped over to the country that you’re in, and your last name is a slave owner’s. How could you say that? How could you have that mentality?”
    kanye new slaves 1
    Anti-establishment propaganda is thwarted to maintain the existing power structure = “Pause that, pause that. That song (“New Slaves”) is a hit record minus, ‘F**k you and your corporation/ Ya’ll n**s can’t control me.’ Because if you can’t control me, then you can’t control him, then you can’t control him, then you can’t control him, and then the information age starts.”

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    "Marvin X is Plato teaching on the streets of Oakland."--Ishmael Reed


    "We doubted a Marvin X
    existed. We double doubt
    there is a Plato Negro."
    --Amiri Baraka 









    Introduction
    by
    Ptah Allah El

    T
    To all seekers of truth living in the post modern world, this volume of
    literature is your pragmatic hustler’s guide and intellectual syllabus
    for success. Some people found it strange when scholar Ishmael Reed
    first compared Marvin X, the son of Owendell and Marian Jackmon to the
    classical Greek Philosopher Plato (427 B.C.), son of Ariston and
    Perictione. 


    No one can argue that both Plato and Marvin X have proven in
    their dialogues/writings to be great thinkers and critics of their
    respective eras. Although separated by over two thousand years of
    history and clearly two distinct worldviews, research proves that these
    poet/philosophers strangely share similar souls. Recently while reading
    about the Dialogues of Plato, I came across a quote by William Chase
    Greene, former Professor of Greek and Latin at Harvard University.
    Greene describes Plato’s works by profoundly stating, “In yet another
    field the Platonic Philosophy seeks to find an escape from the flux.

    Those poets and artist who are content to record the fleeting
    impressions of the senses, or to tickle the fancies and indulge the
    passions of an ignorant people by specious emotional and rhetorical
    appeals, Plato invites to use their art in service of truth.”

    These are timeless words describing Plato’s classic works, yet if you simply
    replace Plato’s name with Marvin X in the above quote, and review
    Marvin’s work over the past 40 years, you won’t be surprised why he has
    adopted the title “Plato Negro”. 

    In this classic volume Marvin X truly becomes Plato personified, as we see him transcend from master poet to philosopher. Plato was once a master poet until the death of his teacher Socrates in (399 B.C.). This marked a turning point in Plato’s life
    causing him to fully convert to philosophy. The same can be said now
    with Marvin X who recently lost his master teacher John Douimbia and has
    since elevated beyond poetry, reincarnating as the philosopher “Plato
    Negro”. 


    These “New Dialogues” of The Wisdom of Plato Negro provide a
    post modern Gorgias, Sophist, Symposium of Laws, on how to hustle and
    survive in the new Obamian American Republic. It is clear that Marvin X
    has become the true Platonist of the day by demonstrating his Platonic
    love for the people, taking us on a symbolic trip through the parable of
    the Cave, where all true analysis takes place, inside the true self. 


    As an African Philosopher, as ironic as it sounds, the works of “Plato
    Negro” prove to be a major contribution to the field of African
    Philosophy. These works provide a model for a standard approach toward
    reflective thinking and critical analysis for African people, still
    trying to define their own philosophical worldview. What Plato’s works
    did to inspire classical Greece and the European generations to follow,
    we hope this brilliant piece of literature from “Plato Negro” will shed
    light on Africans today and future generations to come. Write on “Plato
    Negro”. 

     
    Ptahotep A. El (Trace 101)
    Minister of Education, Academy of da Corner,
    14th and Broadway, downtown Oakland.

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    If you fall I will catch you
    time after time
    a song of trust
    devotion and love
    time after time
    who knows the end of love
    some dramas go on forever
    time after time
    we say a friend is a friend to the end
    time after time. --Marvin X

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  • 12/11/13--03:17: Farewell Soldier Mandela


  • So long soldier
    warrior man strong
    move history forward
    confound the wicked
    the job is still ahead
    free the land
    share the wealth
    can we eat tonight
    do we read in the dark
    what about revolutionary millionaires
    overnight billionaires
    revolution was for money
    for a few
    twenty years have gone
    for some the dream is dead
    is this the New Africa
    why do the boys rape
    think they own the pussy
    some apartheid notion
    male supremacy
    women are human beings
    not rag dolls for the joy of men
    how would you feel if your daughter was raped
    your sister?

    We want the New Africa
    Yes, the Mandela Africa
    Africa rising to freedom
    beyond corruption
    religious tribal madness
    narrow minded

    he paid the price
    in the dungeon of the wicked
    transcended the prison of the mind
    opened the vail for the world
    look at the people wailing
    dancing
    yet fighting
    to be free.
    We salute you soldier
    Peace be with you.
    As-Salaam-Alaikum
    --Marvin X
    12/11/13



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  • 12/17/13--06:02: Parable of the Madpoet

  • Parable of the Madpoet


    Parable of the Madpoet

    And I'm the great would-be poet. Yes. That's right! Poet. Some kind of bastard literature...all it needs is a simple knife thrust. Just let me bleed you, you loud whore, and one poem vanished. A whole people of neurotics, struggling to keep from being sane. And the only thing that would cure the neurosis would be your murder...
    --Amiri Baraka, The Dutchman

    He was a man who lived on the razor's edge, like a tight walker about to fall into the chasm, a false step, a slight loss of balance and he would surely fly headlong into the precipice.


    He wrote to keep from killing, from slaughtering the guilty and innocent. In his warped mind, the choice was society's, not his. For in his selfishness, either let his pen flow or blood shall flow upon the land because he felt wronged, the constant victim of theft, even by his friends or so called friends.

    He had taught at the greatest universities in the land, but was often escorted off campus by police for violating the law of political correctness. He was deported from countries for the same reason, marched onto the plane at gunpoint, the hatch door slammed behind him. If madpoet returned, the prime minister said he would leave.

    His writings were so outrageous people threw them on the ground in the north and dirty south. He told a man who threw his writings on the ground that he was dumber than the dumbest mule in Georgia. The man went away but came back to ask him if that was a line from a movie. Madpoet told him, "You the movie, nigguh!"

    Even though he hadn't sought employment in decades, he believed he was banned from employment for life because of his deranged thoughts, that he was not invited to events to celebrate life or art, even events his peers organized, though he invited them to his productions without fail.

    People wanted him to be rich by saying the right things so the public could accept his writings. But his doctor told him to remain poor so he could be truthful and free. Another friend told him not to worry about money because on the day he died he would surely be rich and famous. He was praised by word of mouth because nobody was going to talk about his writings out loud, but they hush hushed about it. It was very straight and plain. Youth told him he was very blunt!

    Some people thought he liked to whine, snibble and was ungrateful because whenever he put on events they were unique and classical extravaganzas, though sometimes long, drawn out affairs without thought of intermission or length of time. Another mad friend named Sun Ra had taught him about infinity.

    He had been confined to the mental hospital four times, but each time he had taken himself. He enjoyed the mental ward, especially since it was full of artists like himself who had crossed the line from creativity to insanity. Other than drugs, the doctors found nothing wrong with him so when he refused to leave, they threw him out onto the street. The police jabbed him in the ribs with their night sticks as they escorted him off the grounds of the mental hospital.

    So please let his pen flow and do not disturb him for any reason, especially some menial chore, a mundane exercise, just leave him alone in the silence of his room. Let him ponder thoughts beyond the box, beyond the pale of tradition. Let him consider the finer things of life, what words to configure, what metaphors, psycholinguistic turns of the mind, the sociology and historiography of a people, or else there shall be chaos in the land and blood shall flow like a river, for his spirit shall be suppressed and shall seek an outlet in blood from the misery of his mind.

    Yes, he is a killer in disguise, who appears in the persona of a poet for the good of society, but continue to oppress him, suppress him, and he shall strike out in a moment of black madness and those who have wronged him shall see your guts spilled, your head smashed against the concrete sidewalk.

    Believe it, it is only a matter of time before the madpoet shall seek revenge and come upon those who have wronged him. He shall strike like a panther in the night, and you shall cry in horror as his knife enters your throat and from thence to the spilling of your guts upon the ground.

    He shall walk away with a laughter and joy only the devil himself shall understand and appreciate.
    --Marvin X
    4/17/09
    Gullahland, South Carolina
    Revised 4/3/10

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  • 12/17/13--06:33: Kiss My Black Arts
  • The Black Arts Movement Conference will gather at the University of California, Merced, Feb. 28, March 1-2, 2014.

    Special invited guests include Amiri Baraka, Sonia Sanchez, Ishmael Reed, Askia Toure, John Bracey, James Smethurst, Mike Sell, Juan Felipe Herrera, Genny Lim, Jerry Varnado, Terry Collins, James (Jimmy) P. Garrett, Belva Davis, Marvin X, Adilah Barnes, Nathan Hare, Tarika Lewis, Destiny Muhammad, Tacuma King, Earl Davis and others. 
    --A Kim Macmillan/Marvin X production


    Sonia Sanchez, Queen Mother of BAM

    Askia Toure, Rolland Snellings, one of the BAM Godfathers






    Amina and Amiri Baraka, Queen and King of BAM

    Marvin X, West Coast Godfather of BAM

    In less than five years, America will celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Black Arts Movement.  Sonia Sanchez, one of the leading voices of the Black Arts Movement believes that “The black artist is dangerous.  Black art controls the “Negro’s” reality, negates negative influences, and creates positive images.”  These positive images of blackness were celebrated on August 28, 2013, the fiftieth anniversary of the March on Washington.  At the 1963 gathering, Martin Luther King’s “I Had a Dream” speech represented the pinnacle of hope of freedom for all Americans.  The question that must be asked fifty years later is “have we achieved that dream?” We must all ask, with the upcoming 50th anniversary of the Black Arts Movement, have the images of blackness in America changed?  Is blackness still seen as inferior? In Amiri Baraka’s poem “Black Art,” first published in the liberator in 1966, he writes:
    Clean out the world for virtue and love,
    Let there be no love poems written
    until love can exist freely and
    cleanly….We want a black poem. And a 
    Black World.
    Let the world be a Black Poem
    And Let All Black People Speak This Poem
    Silently or LOUD
    Are black people speaking their poems, their truth about blackness? Has the Black Arts Movement created the hoped for change in how black people view themselves?
    These questions and more will be explored at the International Conference on the Black Arts Movement and its influences at UC Merced, March 1-2, 2014.  The call for papers on a worldwide level is asking the larger questions beyond race, and culture  as we examine  what happened during the Black Arts Movement, and how that changed us as a nation, and as a world.  The Black Arts Movement, the spiritual twin of the Black Power Movement is noted for having changed how African Americans viewed themselves as a race.  African Americans in the 1960s and 1970s created a new vision of blackness, one that celebrated the uniqueness of black culture.  This call for papers invites scholars of all cultural and racial backgrounds to submit  work that illustrates the influence of the Black Arts Movement, both past and present.  The Chicano, Asian, Women’s, Disability Rights, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) movements were all influenced by the Black Arts and Black Power Movements, establishing new academic fields of study, and empowering those that society had marginalized.    
    --Kim McMillan


    Contact Kim McMillan at kmcmillon@ucmerced.edu



    CONFERENCE PROGRAM
    SATURDAY, MARCH 1, 2014

    1ST Floor Lantern (Kolligian Library)
    8:00 –  8:30 AM                        Registration, Coffee/Tea and Light Refreshments

    8:30 – 9:00 AM                        Welcoming Remarks (9:00 am – 5:00 pm 

    9:15 – 10:15 AM            Multicultural Panel (Lakireddy Auditorium)
                                        Belva Davis, Panel Moderator
                                        Juan Felipe Herrera, California Poet Laureate
                                        Genny Lim, Poet & Activist
                                        Al Young, California Poet  Laureate Emeritus
                                        Avotcja, Poet
     
    10:30 – 11:30 AM            Black Power and Black Arts Roundtable (Lakireddy Auditorium)
                                        Nigel Hatton, Moderator
                                        Sonia Sanchez, Poet, Playwright, Teacher
                                        John Bracey, UMass Amherst
                                        James Smethurst, UMass Amherst
                                        Amiri Baraka, Producer, Writer, Activist (still waiting for confirmation)
                                        Marvin X, Playwright, Activist
     
    11:30 – 1:00 PM            Luncheon
     
    1:15  –   2:00 PM            Marvin X, Keynote Speaker
     
    2:15  –   3:15 PM            Theatre of the Black Arts Movement (speakers TBA)
     
    4:00     5:30 PM         Northern and Central California Voices of the Black Arts MovementInstallation
                                     Merced Multicultural Arts Center
                                        S.O.S. – Calling All Black People:  A Black Arts Movement Reader
    Discussion with editors:  John H. Bracey Jr., Sonia Sanchez, and James Smethurst

    Dinner
     
    7:00  –  9:00 PM         Theatre of the Black Arts Movement
    (Excerpts from the plays of Amiri Baraka, Sonia Sanchez, Marvin X, Ishmael Reed, Lorraine Hansberry, and George Wolfe) Performed by Michael Lange, Adilah Barnes, and UC Merced Students
    (Must have purchased ticket for this event)
     
    SUNDAY, MARCH 2, 2014
               
                                        Lantern, 1st Floor Kolligian Library
    8:30 – 9:00 AM          Registration, Coffee/Tea and Refreshments
     
    9:15 – 10:15 AM         New Scholarship on the Black Arts and Black Power Movement(Lakireddy Auditorium)
                                        Mike Sell, Indiana University of Pennsylvania
                                        James Smethurst, University of Mass, Amherst
                                        Marvin X, Playwright
                                        Sean Malloy, University of Merced
     
    10:30 – 11:30 AM       Black Studies & the Black Arts Movement
                                        Dr. Nathan Hare
                                        Sonia Sanchez
                                        Dr. John Bracey
                                        Judy Juanita
     
                                       
    Lunch
     
    1:15  –  2:00 PM          Ishmael Reed, Keynote Speaker
     
     
    2:15  –  3:00 PM         Central Valley Voices of the Black Arts Movement
    Nigel Hatton, Moderator
    (Student Papers)
    Give Birth to Brightness: A Thematic Study of Neo-Black Literature by Sherley Anne Williams & Somethin' Proper, the Autobiography of Marvin X
     
     

    Hotel:  Hampton Inn in Merced, CA will offer room discounts to conference attendees.              

    Call for Papers
    A call for papers for an international conference on the Black Arts Movement and Its Influences, University of California, Merced, March 1-2, 2014
     
    In less than five years, America will celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Black Arts Movement.  Sonia Sanchez, one of the leading voices of the Black Arts Movement believes that “The black artist is dangerous.  Black art controls the “Negro’s” reality, negates negative influences, and creates positive images.”  These positive images of blackness were celebrated on August 28, 2013, the fiftieth anniversary of the March on Washington.  At the 1963 gathering, Martin Luther King’s “I Had a Dream” speech represented the pinnacle of hope of freedom for all Americans.  The question that must be asked fifty years later is “have we achieved that dream?” We must all ask, with the upcoming 50thanniversary of the Black Arts Movement, have the images of blackness in America changed?  Is blackness still seen as inferior? In Amiri Baraka’s poem “Black Art,” first published in the liberator in 1966, he writes:
     
    Clean out the world for virtue and love,
    Let there be no love poems written
    until love can exist freely and
    cleanly….We want a black poem. And a 
    Black World.
    Let the world be a Black Poem
    And Let All Black People Speak This Poem
    Silently or LOUD
     
    Are black people speaking their poems, their truth about blackness? Has the Black Arts Movement created the hoped for change in how black people view themselves?
     
    These questions and more will be explored at the International Conference on the Black Arts Movement and its influences at UC Merced, March 1-2, 2014.  The call for papers on a worldwide level is asking the larger questions beyond race, and culture  as we examine  what happened during the Black Arts Movement, and how that changed us as a nation, and as a world.  The Black Arts Movement, the spiritual twin of the Black Power Movement is noted for having changed how African Americans viewed themselves as a race.  African Americans in the 1960s and 1970s created a new vision of blackness, one that celebrated the uniqueness of black culture.  This call for papers invites scholars of all cultural and racial backgrounds to submit  work that illustrates the influence of the Black Arts Movement, both past and present.  The Chicano, Asian, Women’s, Disability Rights, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) movements were all influenced by the Black Arts and Black Power Movements, establishing new academic fields of study, and empowering those that society had marginalized.    
     
    This conference, sponsored by the University of Merced’s African Diaspora Graduate Student Association, seeks papers that offer new scholarship on the Black Arts and Black Power Movements as well as new insights into the following areas of study:
     
    ◦                            Regional examinations of the Black Arts Movement
    ◦                           The Black Arts Movement -- national and international
    ◦                            Women authors of The Black Arts Movement
    ◦                            Male domination and the Black Arts Movement
    ◦                           The Politics and Art of the Black Power and Black Arts Movements
    ◦                           Symbology and the Black Arts and Black Power Movements
    ◦                            Cultural Legacies of the Black Arts Movement
    ◦                            Community Theatre and the Black Arts Movement
    ◦                           Clothing, Music, and Art of the Black Arts Movement
    ◦                            Race and the Black Arts Movement
    ◦                            The use of Poetry and Drama in the Black Arts Movement
    ◦                           The media and the Black Arts and Black Power Movements
    ◦                            The historical context of the Black Arts Movement
    ◦                            The Black Panthers and the Black Arts Movement
    ◦                        The influence of the Black Arts Movement on other cultures
    ◦                        The use of language as Art in the Black Arts Movement
    ◦                        The creation of the Black Arts and Black Power Movement
    ◦                        Film and the Black Arts Movement
    ◦                       The Intersection between the Civil Rights and the Black Power, and Black Arts Movements
     
    Special invited guests include:  Sonia Sanchez, Ishmael Reed, John Bracey, James Smethurst, Mike Sell, Juan Felipe Herrera, Genny Lim, Al Young, Belva Davis, Marvin X, Adilah Barnes, Dr. Nathan Hare, and others.
     
    Please send your one-page abstract and brief bio to Kim McMillon at kmcmillon@ucmerced.edu by December 18, 2013.
     
    Call for Papers, Reports, and Studies:
     
    The Black Arts Movement Conference invites the following types of submissions:
     
    Research Papers - Completed research papers in any of the topic areas listed above or related areas.
      
    Student Papers - Research done by students in any of the topic areas listed above, or related areas.
     
    Case Studies - Case studies in any of the topic areas listed above, or related areas.
     
    Work-in-Progress Reports for Future Research - Incomplete research in any of the topic areas listed above, or related areas. 
     
     
    Presentations:
     
    Paper sessions will consist of no more than four presentations in a 80-minute session.  The session will be divided equally between the presenters.
     
    Workshop presentations will be given a full 60-minute session.
     
    Panel sessions will provide an opportunity for three or more presenters to speak in a more open session where ideas can be exchanged.  These sessions are 80 minutes.
     
    Poster sessions will last 90 minutes and consist of a large number of presenters.  The following supplies will be provided for poster sessions:
                    Easel
                    Tri-fold display board (48 x 36 inches)
                    Markers
                    Push pins
    •                Tape
    •                Round table
    •                Chairs
     
    Submitting a Proposal/Paper:
     
    Make your submission by
    following these directions:
     
    Create a title page for your submission.  The title page must include:
     
    a.              Title of the submission
    b.              Topic area of the submission (choose a topic area from the list at the top of this page)
    c.              Presentation format (choose one: Paper Session, Workshop, Panel Session, or Poster Session)
    d.              A description of your presentation, which should not exceed 150 words in total. Please note that       you are still required to send in an abstract/paper in addition to this description.
    e.              paper author(s):
    f.               EACH author, should list the following:
    •                Full Name
    •                Department/Division
    •                University/Company/Organization
    •     Email Address (all acceptance/rejection letters are sent via email, so it is very important to have a correct email address for each author.)
     
    g. Email your abstract and/or paper, along with the above-described title page, to kmcmillon@ucmerced.edu.  Receipt of submissions will be acknowledged via email within one week.  
     
    NOTE:  Conference papers, proposal, panels, workshops, and poster sessions will take place on the University of California, Merced campus concurrently from 9-4 pm on Saturday, and 10 am – 2:00 pm on Sunday, March 1-2, 2014.  
     

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    Our prayers go out to Amiri Baraka who is hospitalized in Newark, NJ. He entered the hospital over the weekend suffering from diabetes, then a mild heart attack, then pneumonia, according to his beloved wife Amina. Godfather of the Black Arts Movement, Baraka invited Marvin X to read at New York University on Feb. 4, 2014, in honor of poet Jayne Cortez who has joined the ancestors.

    Baraka was invited by Kim McMillan and Marvin X to address the Black Arts Movement Conference, Feb. 28, March 1-2, 2014, at the University of California, Merced. We pray AB will attend both events.  We ask all of you to hold him up in your prayers. We consider him our greatest living revolutionary writer/activist.

    We also ask you to pray for another dear and precious friend, Dr. Julia Hare. We visited Nathan and Julia today. Dr. Nathan Hare says there is no recovery from the condition of his wife of 57 years.
     Dr. Nathan Hare, father of Black Studies

    Marvin X, Dr. Julia Hare, Dr. Nathan Hare, Attorney Amira Jackmon, agent for the Hare's archives
    --Marvin X
    12/24/13

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    And Job said it best
    naked I came and naked I go
    ache
    there is only one lesson to learn in this life
    Nature Boy told us this
    learn to love and be loved in return
    all else illusion
    money fame sex
    momentary pleasures
    ephemeral desires
    diversions from the real
    who can see through all the conundrums
    across the precipice to the meta reality
    only superman can stand tall
    how many can persist from man to superman
    J.A. Rogers asked and answered
    one superman committed suicide
    another fell from a horse
    who is the real superman?
    who has endured death a thousand times
    crucified resurrected ascended
    who is the black stone the builders rejected
    who passed through the door of no return
    yet returned to the motherland
    no matter centuries later
    a son came home
    daughter too
    ten thousand met them at the airport
    twenty thousand at the compound of the high priest
    prophesy fulfilled
    Oh brother and sister
    help us through the weary night

    help us beyond poverty disease ignorance
    help us transcend tribalism sectarianism dogmatism greedism corruptionism
    state terror religious madness beyond all the prophets
    Jesus Muhammad Buddha, even Marx and Lenin
    help us walk from the dungeon to the upper room of our father's house
    Come my daughter, walk with your king to his father's house
    he has not defied righteousness
    he has not defiled the gods
    he has not disgraced the ancestors
    he has not lied when the feather went on the scale of Ma-at
    he has been a warrior for truth
    he told no lies
    so walk with your king
    loving him unconditionally until the end of all things
    that matter
    no devotion to the trivial mundane provincial
    fly with him into the midnight hour
    rejoice
    elders shall become ancestors
    there is no escape
    death is life and life is death
    enjoy the holy days
    and all days are holy
    if we walk with the righteous
    shun the scandalous
    the rats snakes vermin

    the terrible night is over
    the dawn is upon us
    let us dance sing shout wail.
    --Marvin X
    12/25/13






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  • 12/26/13--16:20: Kiss My Black Arts

  • Photo: Inspired by Visual artist Rtystk #kissmyblackarts   Filled with soul Colorful and vibrant Alive Divine creative flow Black art is that rock and roll, hip hop  Jazz and R&B soul Black art is Chuck berry, Little Richard and those that go unnamed Black art is that cookout music  That holy ghost music Gospel sung in churches without any Black faces Black art is that spiritual that cracked your heart open and had you praying to your maker  Black Art is up in your face That  jungle fever, Niggas with Attitude  Don’t believe the hype and Do it in the butt Black Art  is that caged bird that sings and the coldest Winter Ever That strange Fruit and Native Son Black Art made you Lindy hop and wonder what’s going on? Made you twist and shout Black Art refuses to be “othered” and only “urban” Hip hop your ass around the world  To see cyphers in native tongues  Pop locking, Harlem shaking back to their humanity Black Arts is that Zora Neale Hurston  Phillis Wheatley   Audre Lorde and those that go unnammed Black art is Passionate , fiery and commands authority Black Arts draws you in and is sexy It is that Grace Jones, that Josephine Baker and Zane chronicles Black art made you turn off the lights and get a sexual healing Black art is the  language of shizzles, rhythmic flows,  finger snaps and skatting Black art is history and present Black art will tell the truth when everyone is lying Black art is   the voice of the people past and present  Really the closest thing to being Black without being Black Black art will tell the truth when everyone is lying
    Inspired by Visual artist Rtystk #kissmyblackarts

    Filled with soul
    Colorful and vibrant
    Alive
    Divine creative flow
    Black art is that rock and roll, hip hop
    Jazz and R&B soul
    Black art is Chuck berry, Little Richard and those that go unnamed
    Black art is that cookout music
    That holy ghost music
    Gospel sung in churches without any Black faces
    Black art is that spiritual that cracked your heart open and had you praying to your maker
    Black Art is up in your face
    That jungle fever, Niggas with Attitude
    Don’t believe the hype and Do it in the butt
    Black Art is that caged bird that sings and the coldest Winter Ever
    That strange Fruit and Native Son
    Black Art made you Lindy hop and wonder what’s going on?
    Made you twist and shout
    Black Art refuses to be “othered” and only “urban”
    Hip hop your ass around the world
    To see cyphers in native tongues
    Pop locking, Harlem shaking back to their humanity
    Black Arts is that Zora Neale Hurston Phillis Wheatley
    Audre Lorde and those that go unnammed
    Black art is Passionate , fiery and commands authority
    Black Arts draws you in and is sexy
    It is that Grace Jones, that Josephine Baker and Zane chronicles
    Black art made you turn off the lights and get a sexual healing
    Black art is the language of shizzles, rhythmic flows, finger snaps and skatting
    Black art is history and present
    Black art will tell the truth when everyone is lying
    Black art is the voice of the people past and present
    Really the closest thing to being Black without being Black
    Black art will tell the truth when everyone is lying

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    When the Black Arts Movement Conference happens at UC Merced, Feb. 28 thru March 2, 2014, we wonder will the BAM folks get the turn out folks gave the First Lady? Probably not, but the BAM conference will be one of the largest gathering of North American Africans in Merced history.


    It will be an event of critical importance as well, setting the stage for the 50th anniversary of BAM, the most radical literary and artistic movement in American history, featuring many of the founders, including Amiri Baraka, aka LeRoi Jones, Askia Toure, Sonia Sanchez, Marvin X, Roscoe Mitchell and others associated with BAM such as Ishmael Reed and Al Young.

    For sure, BAM was a Black Nationalist movement inspired by the Nation of Islam, very similar to the Harlem Renaissance that was motivated by the Marcus Garvey Movement. There are those who will try to paint BAM as multicultural, but that came later, a result of BAM's impact on other ethnic groups and especially upon white academia. BAM was the root cause of American academia deciding to include non-white radical literature in its curriculum. Of course the effort was Miller Lite in the form of Black Studies and other ethnic and gender studies. BAM must now pass the baton to the next generation, i.e., the Black Power Babies and the Hip Hop generation, especially the conscious hip hop people.

    We congratulate sister Kim McMillan and especially the University of California, Merced for deciding to produce this conference. We are already talking about a national tour to celebrate the 50th anniversary of BAM.
    --Marvin X, co-producer 

    Michelle Obama inspires UC Merced graduates

    Published 4:00 am, Sunday, May 17, 2009
    • First Lady Michelle Obama delivers the commencement speech to the first full graduating class of UC Merced on Saturday, May 16, 2009 in Merced, Calif. Photo: Michael Macor, The Chronicle
      First Lady Michelle Obama delivers the commencement speech to the first full graduating class of UC Merced on Saturday, May 16, 2009 in Merced, Calif. Photo: Michael Macor, The Chronicle





    They loved her, she loved them, and in the admiration-fest between Michelle Obama and the graduating class of UC Merced, the first lady of the United States exhorted them to go out and use their newfound skills to help those most in need.

    "Remember that you are blessed," Obama told the crowd seated before her on the only big field the fledgling campus can muster, a grassy plain set beneath a scorching midday sun. "You must bend down and let someone stand on your shoulders so they can see a better future."
    Obama reminded them that, like half of the student body at this 4-year-old campus, she was the first in her family to attend college. And she urged the 500 graduates, who constitute the first class to go from freshman to senior year at UC Merced, to seek jobs where they help disadvantaged children in particular. Help those, she said, "who never go to college ... who can't get a break ... who have lost the ability to dream."
    And if not that, she said, find work innovating green technology or doing other things to kick-start the nation's wobbling economy.
    "We are going to need all of you graduates," Obama said. "Make your legacy a lasting one. Dream big."
    Mindful that she was speaking in one of the most economically depressed cities in California, the first lady also warned the Class of 2009 that times are tough out there. Instead of a welcoming job market, she said, the graduates are likely to find low salaries, daunting loan repayment bills and "your share of setbacks."
    "But in those moments, in those inevitable moments, I urge you to think about this day," she said. "Look around you. ... Never let setbacks or fear dictate the course of your life."
    The first lady's 29-minute commencement speech, delivered to the parents, visitors and students with a forceful, building crescendo that hit climaxes akin to a preacher's sermon, couldn't have fallen on more receptive ears.
    "Awesome. Everything she said about struggling and motivation applied to myself," said freshman Rogelio Grijalva of Fairfield. "Sometimes I think, 'Man, I'm not going to make it.' And now whenever I feel that way, I'll think about what she said.
    "She relates, you can tell," he said, shaking his head almost reverently.
    The student body had launched a full-court press last winter to lure Obama to UC Merced, sending her thousands of letters and Valentines and posting come-on-over videos online. Their message was that the 2,718 widely diverse, mostly modest-income students who attend UC's newest campus are fervent about public service, and that she and the president embody the feisty can-do attitude they believe they bring to their own pursuit to uplift themselves and those around them.
    On Saturday, as her ascendance to the stage brought the class leaping to its feet, screaming and pumping fists in the air, Obama's beaming smile and wave indicated that she had taken their pleas fully to heart.
    "All I can say is, 'Wow,'" Obama told them. "A few people may be wondering: Why did I choose the University of California in Merced to deliver my first commencement speech as first lady? Well, let me tell you something. The answer is simple: You inspired me. You touched me."
    A tiny campus of just three main buildings, UC Merced glistened for its big moment with fresh paint and landscaping. The walkways were scrubbed to a shine, eager students set up booths on the quad to tout their favorite causes - for example, volunteering for local children's clubs - and a Mariachi band blared bouncy tunes into the quad.
    The field where the gigantic stage was erected for Obama's speech is usually a haven called "The Bowl" where Frisbees and lounging lunch-takers rule. But with 12,000 people seated on it Saturday - 10,000 more than were expected before Obama was booked - the grass and everything around it took on a solemn, distinguished tone that students and faculty hope will carry through for years.
    "Michelle Obama's speech here shows everyone, now and forever, that our hard work paid off," said graduating psychology major Alvina Bueno. "And it was hard work."
    The day dawned hot and got hotter, and by the time the thermometer flirted with a bone-dry 100 degrees around noon, everyone was swigging water bottles like tipplers at a free bar.
    The air-conditioned portable toilets on the sun-blasted commencement field, where people were confined by Secret Service agents for hours once they entered, were jammed with people looking not only for relief, but a few minutes of cool.
    It was one day when Obama's much-touted tendency to wear sleeveless clothing would have come in handy - but alas, she had to wear a ceremonial robe for her speech.
    "A lot of people from the Bay Area aren't used to this heat, but for us in the Central Valley this is nothing," said junior Elizabeth Kang, who helped hand out 1,000 water bottles by lunchtime. "We call this nice weather."
    The same ebullience that greeted Obama on campus spilled into nearby Merced, a dusty cattle town hard hit by foreclosures and chiefly known for the gas stations you pull into en route to Yosemite Park on Highway 140. But this week, its overlooked charms of say-howdy friendliness and pride in its world-class UC campus have outshone all other attributes.
    A downtown festival, dubbed Cap & Town, Friday and Saturday packed the streets with thousands of visitors who happily strapped themselves into round metal cages to become human bowling balls at one booth, gobbled Indian and Mexican food at other booths, and sat with toddlers in hand in the middle of Main Street to watch "Finding Nemo" on a JumboTron.
    "This is going to give me material to paint forever," gushed local artist Becky Wilson, sipping beer at the Partisan bar while a rock group blared Badfinger cover songs on the street outside. "You remember Jackie O? Michelle's the same thing. There's never been anything bigger than this in Merced. Ever!"

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    Marvin X made a rare public appearance in his central valley hometown of Fresno last night. His talk on Umoja or unity stressed the need for a unified mental apparatus as the prerequisite for uniting the family, community and nation. He was introduced by Professor emeritus of Black Studies at Fresno City College, Kehindi Solwazi. Professor Solwzi told the crowd how he read Dr. M's How to Recover from the Addiction to white supremacy and was blown away, especially by the poet's self criticism, so rare these days. He urged the people to purchase the book and they did.

    In his remarks, Marvin X first asked the audience to pray for his friends Amiri Baraka and Dr. Julia Hare. Baraka is hospitalized and Julia Hare is suffering third stage Alzheimer's. Marvin X has long been associated with Dr. Nathan Hare, sociologist, psychologist and founding publisher of the Black Scholar magazine and Black Male/female magazine. Marvin told the folks gathered on a cold valley night that if they can get pass Dr. Hare's foreword to How to Recover they will have no problems with his manual, a 13 step process to recover from white supremacy type II as Dr. Hare calls our condition. Once we detox from white supremacy type II we can begin the long road to recovery of our  mental equilibrium. We cannot unite with anyone while the self is shattered and traumatized.

    If you can get off alcohol, crack, meth and other drugs, you can recover from white supremacy type II. There are not enough Dr. Hare's to go around and many of the black psychologists are certified by white supremacy academic institutions thus the black doctors are in need of recovery themselves. He said many of them are now getting certified in African healing methods.

    Fear of the self is prolonging our condition. We fear self and fear others so there can be no unity of any kind without eliminating fear which is the first step in the process of recovery from white supremacy type II. We must establish mental health peer groups in our community.

    In the peer groups Dr. Nathan Hare and Marvin X facilitated along with social worker Suzzette Celeste called Black Reconstruction, the woman were found to be the most angry and the most militant. Brothers were afraid to say they had fears but when probed they finally admitted they had a plethora of fears. He's scared of himself, his woman, his children, another brother and of course the white man.

    The small crowd was overjoyed with his remarks. He is scheduled to appear in Fresno during Black History Month at Fresno City College and in the community at Hinton Center. His Hinton Center appearance is sponsored by the Fresno Chapter of the NAACP, Pamela Young, President.

    February 28, March 1-2, he will present at the Black Arts Movement Conference, University of
    California, Merced. East Coast people can catch Marvin X at New York University, February 4 at the tribute for ancestor poet Jayne Cortez. To book Marvin X, please call 510-200-4164. Email: jmarvinx@yahoo.com.

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    amiri-baraka-hospitalized-improving.jpg


     
    Richard Khavkine/The Star-Ledger By Richard Khavkine/The Star-Ledger The Star-Ledger    
    December 27, 2013 at 12:38 AM, updated December 27, 2013 at 12:38 PM

     
     
     
     
     
     
    The poet and playwright Amiri Baraka, who was hospitalized in critical condition earlier this week, was said to be improving. Baraka is pictured at a panel discussion at the Newark Museum in 1999. 
    NEWARK— Amiri Baraka, the former New Jersey poet laureate who was hospitalized in critical condition earlier this week, is improving, according to a spokesman for his son, Newark Councilman Ras Baraka.

    “He continues to improve,” the spokesman, Frank Baraff, said by email early this morning. “His condition is not dire.”
    Baraka, 79, was hospitalized Monday. Lawrence Hamm, the state chairman of the People's Organization for Progress, said the poet, author and playwright had been taken to the intensive care unit at Beth Israel Medical Center in Newark.
    Citing the family’s request for privacy, Baraff declined to say why Baraka had been hospitalized.
    Baraka, a Newark native formerly known as LeRoi Jones, was the state's poet laureate in 2002 and 2003. He was the last to hold the post, which was abolished during his tenure after he wrote "Somebody Blew Up America," a poem about the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks that was alternately praised for its frankness and criticized for what others called its anti-Semitic content.
    Asked to resign by then-Gov. James McGreevey, Baraka refused. The state Legislature abolished the laureate post, effectively removing him.
    Last month, the 50th anniversary of Baraka’s “Blues People,” a history of music from the time of slavery throughout the various incarnations of blues and jazz, was celebrated as part of the New Jersey Performing Arts Center's TD Moody Democracy of Jazz Festival.

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    The North American Africans in Fresno, CA appear ready to recover from the addiction to white supremacy type II. According to remarks made at the Kwanza celebration at the African American Museum, the president of the local chapter of the NAACP, Pamela Young-King, will invite Marvin X to set up a workshop series based on his book How to Recover from the Addiction to White Supremacy, a manual for a 13 step mental health peer group. It was the consensus of those present at Kwanza that there is a pressing community need to detox and recover from the vicious and cunning virus of white supremacy type II as defined by Dr. Nathan Hare in his foreword to Dr. M's manual:

     Much in the manner of Hegel in his essay on “Master and Slave,” Marvin senses that the oppressor distorts his own mind as well as the mind of the oppressed. Hence Type I and Type II White Supremacy Addiction. White sociologists and the late black psychologist, Bobby Wright, converged in their findings of pathological personality traits (“the authoritarian personality” and “the racial psychopathic personality,” as Bobby put it).

    But if Hegel was correct in his notion that the oppressor cannot free the slave, that the slave must force the oppressor’s hand, then it is Type II White Supremacy Addiction which if not more resistant to cure, must occupy our primary focus. Type II White Supremacy may be seen as a kind of “niggeritis” or “Negrofication” growing out of an over-identification with the master, who is white. As in any disorder severity of symptoms may vary from mild to moderate or severe.  

    As Frantz Fanon put it when he spoke for the brother with jungle fever in Black Skin, White Mask: “I wish to be regarded as white. If I can be loved by the white woman who is loved by the white man, then I am white like the white man; I am a full human being.” In the twisted mental convolution of a brother in black skin behind a white mask, Fanon observed a “Negro dependency complex” independently chronicled in my own Black Anglo Saxons (black individuals with white minds in black bodies). They struggle to look, think, talk and walk white by day, then go to sleep at night and dream that they will wake up white. They refuse to realize that no matter what they may ever do they will never get out of the black race alive.

    On the other hand, you are going to be seeing “nouveau blacks” and lesser Afrocentrics -- who faithfully and unquestionably follow twelve-month years and endeavor even to blackenize the twelve disciples of Jesus Christ -- jumping up to question Dr. M’s re-africanization of the “Twelve Steps” model for “using the Eurocentric twelve steps,” but they forget  that the very effort to be practical and collective is the original African way.  In any event, we must build on whites as whites have built on us, taking the best of the West and leaving the rest alone.  But Dr. M has expressly and creatively added a thirteenth step; for his goal is not just recovery but discovery, his goal is not just to change the individual but to change the individual to get ready to change the world. --Dr. Nathan Hare, PhD.

    The North American Africans of Fresno will be invited to register for the 13 week workshop during Marvin X's appearance in Fresno on Saturday, February 22, 3pm at the Hinton Center.  The NAACP with host a reading and conversation with the poet/essayist/philosopher who is called Plato teaching on the streets of Oakland (Ishmael Reed), the USA's Rumi (Bob Holman), Mark Twain (Rudolph Lewis), the new Malcolm X (Jerri Lange).

    On February 28, March 1-2, 2014, Marvin X will co-produce, along with Kim McMillan, a conference on the Black Arts Movement ( the most radical artistic and literary movement in American history) at the University of California, Merced.


    For more information call 510-200-4164, email Marvin X at jmarvinx@yahoo.com.
     




     

     

     



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    Detoxing White Supremacy

    Prior to our attempt at recovery from the effects of the addiction to white supremacy, we need to consider detoxification, to rid the body and mind from the toxicity of decades under the influence of racist ideology and institutions that have rendered us into a state of drunkenness and denial. Many of us are convinced we have no problem with racism and/or white supremacy. Some say we love everyone, but would not be pleased with our son or daughter marrying out of the ethnic group. There are those of us who think Africans or Caribbean blacks or Mexicans are taking all the jobs, all the housing, although many of the jobs we would not consider doing, much of the housing being occupied by Latinos we consider too ghetto to live in. So we suffer clouded thinking or stinking thinking as they say in the drug recovery community.

    In short, we need to detox to clear our minds in preparation for the recovery process. Detox may involve some form of isolation and meditation, any method that would separate us from society, including friends and family that have been the cause of our psychosis, that break with reality that has our life confounded and delusional. We may need a radical dietary change as many of the foods have a negative bio-chemical effect on our thinking and hence actions. It could be the white sugar, white flour, hormone fed beef and chicken, mercury filled fish, genetically altered fruits and vegetables that we need to eliminate from our diet so we can think with a better chemical balance, especially as it affects our central nervous system. Perhaps we should spend a week or two or three in retreat from the stress of daily life so we can ponder the ill effects of our thinking on social interaction, so we can relax and seriously consider the recovery program that awaits us. Some may want to fast and/or pray while in the detox stage, but hard thinking is in order before peer group interaction. For sure there will be denial, arrogance and superior attitudes, even feelings of inferiority may be expressed, so let’s do some preparation and self thought before we expose ourselves to group thought, then perhaps we can enter the group with more confidence and seriousness. Let us prepare to rid our minds of thoughts that engender hatred in the family, in the community, nation and global village. We must consider not only the humanity of each other but our divinity. As my poem What If says, “What if God is the brother you hate, the sister you hate, the mother and father you hate, the dope fiend you hate, the Mexican you hate, the African you hate, the Jamaican you hate, the so-called Negro you hate, the white man you hate, what if what if what if….”

    Finally, detoxing from white supremacy should prepare us to consider the economic system that has brought so much pain and suffering to the world, especially to the majority that has not benefited from the blessings of the so-called free market system that seeks cheap labor and the production of cheap goods for the consumer driven economy. We should detox from the desire to possess things upon things for no other reason than greed and selfishness. We should consider that most of the world has no electricity or clean drinking water. The citizens of America should consider why they are only 4% of the population yet consume 25% of the world’s energy. Consider what feelings of anger this might engender in the poor and dispossessed around the world, and why they may want to attack America who cares nothing about them except as sources of cheap labor, cheap natural resources and markets to expand capitalist or imperialist domination, otherwise known as white supremacy.
    --Marvin X

    from How to Recover from the addiction to White Supremacy, a 13 step manual for a Pan African Mental Health Peer Group, Dr. M (Marvin X), Black Bird Press, Berkeley, CA, 2007, $19.95. Order direct from the publisher: Black Bird Press, 1222 Dwight Way, Berkeley CA 94702

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    Based on the book by Dr. M (Marvin X) How to Recover from the Addiction to White Supremacy, foreword by Dr. Nathan Hare, afterword by Ptah Allah El (Tracy Mitchell),
    Black Bird Press, Berkeley CA, 2008.

    The facilitator should use this format to stay focused in a timely manner, to maintain order and yet allow for the free expression on the people. This meeting is thus a sacred space and time for people to vent and begin the long process of recovery from addiction to white supremacy/lunacy. Anyone can, should and must become a meeting facilitator.



    1. Welcome. Welcome to the Pan African Mental Health Peer Group to recover from the addiction to white supremacy/lunacy. My name is ___________________. I am recovering from the adduction to white supremacy.

    2. Group response: Hotep, Salaam_________________.

    3. I am your facilitator for this meeting. Please join me in prayer and medication, especially for all those persons suffering from the addiction to white supremacy around the world. . I will read the poem What If on page 97 of our text.

    4. Definition of White Supremacy: a form of domination and exploitation. White supremacy can be in white face, black face, or any other color, male or female. White supremacy is a drug so pervasive that even when we think we are cured, the ravages and residue appear, affecting our thinking and behavior, social relations and interaction in the home, on the job, at religious worship, social and cultural events. In short, this drug is sometimes tasteless, colorless, yet cunning and vile. We think we are cured, yet a slip of the tongue proves the illness has reappeared, often suddenly without the slightest indication.

    5. Will a volunteer please read the Thirteen Steps taken from our text. See table of contents.

    6. A telephone list is being circulated; please add your name, address, phone and email. Indicate if you are available to mentor another brother or sister in recovery from white supremacy. Please take numbers if you wish. The telephone is a means of gaining the needed support from each other between meetings. Email also.

    7. Donations. It is now time for donations since we cannot support our recovery without the proper finances to sustain the meeting such as rent, printing of literature, refreshments and the like. However, just give what you can.

    8. Check-in. The meeting is open for check-in. Please limit your talk to five minutes so everyone gets a chance to share. In this meeting we discourage cross talk. Cross talk is defined as commenting, interrupting, criticizing or giving advice on another person’s share. We need a safe and supportive place to discuss our feelings and cross talk can be very hurtful and humiliating. Thank you. Who would like to begin the check-in?

    9. Someone volunteer to read the Step of the present meeting.

    10. Speaker. At this time I would like to introduce the speaker who will talk for twenty minutes on the present Step.

    11. Discussion. The session is now open for discussion and comments.

    12. Closing prayer. Read Step 7, page 78 or any prayer you desire.

    13. Next meeting date and any reading assignments.

    For more information or to invite Marvin X to establish a Pan African mental health peer group in your community, please call 510-200-4164, email jmarvinx@yahoo.com.

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    13 Steps

    Step 1: We are not powerless over self-hatred, racism white supremacy thinking but our lives have become unmanageable.

    Step 2: We have come to believe that a power within ourselves can restore us to sanity.

    Step 3: We have made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God.

    Step 4:We shall make a searching and fearless moral inventory.

    Step 5: Admitted to God within and without the exact nature of our wrongs.

    Step 6: We are entirely ready to have God remove defects of character.

    Step 7: We humbly ask God to remove our shortcomings.

    Step 8: Make a list of all Africans and others we have harmed.

    Step 9: Make direct amends to such people.

    Step 10: Continue to take personal inventory.

    Step 11: Seek through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God.

    Step 12: Carry the message to the Pan African world and other humans in the global community.

    Step 13: Discover Pan African consciousness and join the cultural revolution.

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    Black Bird Press News & Review: Review of How to Recover from the Addiction to White Supremacy:


     
     In the great tradition of indigenous healers, Dr. M pours love into patients inspiring hope for a cure for what others have deemed the only reality. Like all scientists, Dr. M is experimenting, hoping that patients will actively involve themselves in their recovery. The "peer group mental health model" accompanies the book and allows the reader to form their own circle to undergo transformation with friends, family, or those people you haven't met yet. Starting a much needed dialogue, Dr. M brings forward "5000 watts" of shock therapy to awake people to their senses.


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