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A journal dedicated to truth, freedom of speech and radical spiritual consciousness. Our mission is the liberation of men and women from oppression, violence and abuse of any kind, interpersonal, political, religious, economic, psychosexual. We believe as Fidel Castro said, "The weapon of today is not guns but consciousness."
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    How many poems must I write about Hammond B3 and Me?

    There is no me without Hammond B3
    7th Street sacred music
    For me anyway
    Don’t care bout nobody else
    B3 stole my  soul
    No matter jazz blues gospel rock n roll
    B3 my  West Oakland chil
    dhood
    West Oakland Blues B3
    For me
    West Oakland Jazz
    B3 for me
    Restaurant B3
    Pool Hall Juke Box B3
    Barber shop
    Shoeshine stand B3

    but I never heard Lower Bottom name for Pine Street
    Everybody knew Pine Street was end on 7th Street
    End of West Oakland
    End of Amtrack Train line, 16th Street Station,
    Ho’ Stroll too
    Ho Hotel by hour
    Cross from Amtrack Station
    Pine Street Ho' stroll
    after Pine was Army Base, Navy Supply Center
    Used to sell Jet Ebony Magazines up and down 7th
    Past John Singers
    Pullman Porters Union Hall upstairs
    Past the Barn eatery
    Easter's Orbit Room
    Way past Slim Jenkins Club
    Josephine Baker was there for months/years it seemed
    parents talked of Josephine Josephine
    I could only see her pic outside Slim Jenkins Restaurant
    Used to see ad for Earl Father Hines too
    wondered who he was
    nobody told me how great he was
    but parents praised Josephine Baker
    I loved her before I knew her
    West Oakland
    Harlem of West Ceoast
    Lived 7th and Campbell
    Across street Lincoln Theatre
    Mr. Freeman managed
    black films advertised
    scared to see black films
    childhood white supremacy mind dead
    wondered in my ignut negro mind
    what these f'ilms bout
    ain't tarzan jane
    ain't Lone Ranger Tonto
    I wanna see white man kill Indians
    didn't know I was part Native American
    Granny from Oklahoma Territory
    Granny wasn't religious
    She was spiritual
    told me and my brother don't shoot birds on Sunday with beebee gun
    Granny used to feed anyone white black stop at her door in projects
    say they hungry
    spiritual not religious
    didn't go to church spiritual
    told my brother boy you go end up in pen
    Granny right
    brother spent whole life in pen
    deprived me of older brother love
    til his last days
    lived round corner from me
    Lake Merritt
    got to know him a little in last days
    we put his remains in Lake Merritt
    Put mine there too with my brother
    A real nigga
    just don't cross him
    then you got a problem
    killer man loan shark killer
    shot his boss in back of head
    boss owed him money wouldn't pay
    love my brother
    he was better human being than I until crossed
    before he joined ancestors
    he was family ATM
    after no more drinking gambling poker except on internet
    in the end he was brother I always wanted him to be
    In the end I think he appreciated me
    even if he didn't understand me
    and who understands me
    I don't even understand myself
    Like everybody he tolerated me though overwhelmed
    around the corner from me
    but I gave him his space
    private cell
    wanted him to be at peace with himself
    no stress from me
    family stress took him down into the dungeon for the last time
    came to Oakland from Seattle
    picked him up at bus station
    told him I wanted to show him love
    said he didn't know love
    wanted to live in SRO hotel
    I said no brother
    ain't dropping you at SRO hotel
    I took him home with me til he found a place with his Section 8
    God blessed me and him to live around the corner from each other in his last days
    up from Lake Merritt
    did it matter
    we never walked the lake together
    did it matter
    I never went over his apartment to watch games on TV
    never went over for small talk
    I don't know small talk with men or women
    I know he liked privacy as I do
    He almost never came to my apartment around the corner
    I didn't trip
    I honored him as older brother even though only one year older
    It was enough joy when he came to 14th and Broadway
    to get his medicine cigarettes
    he would come sit at my Academy of da Corner
    He saw black people bring donations
    he thought I was loan shark
    but I gave credit for books
    he saw people pay me
    I never kept tabs like loan sharks
    he was amazed at the beauty of black people
    most of us don't know the royal beauty of black people
    no matter our negrocities
    black royalty
    kings queens
    gods goddesses
    parading in persona of rut gut niggas
    still royal pushing shopping cart love
    rut gut wine love
    bipolar love lasting longer than black bourgeoisie fake love
    golden handcuff love
    kick my ass but I'm staying love
    too many perks love

    In the end
    cancer too him out
    Told us to burn him
    put ashes in lake
    we did

    put me there too with my brother
    don't care bout Northern Cradle versus Southern Cradle burial customs
    throw my ashes in lake with my brother I came to love in our last days
    thankful I got to love his brotherly love
    if only for a moment
    no matter
    life is a moment
    nothing lasts forever
    At least I didn't cross him
    showed him my man hand
    didn't come like no punk ass bitch nigga
    ain't gonna speak on other relatives
    me and my brother prison niggas
    we know ride yo own beef
    no man can bear burdens of another
    I knew he was killer
    San Quentin Soledad Folsom
    McNeil Island
    California Youth Authority beginning
    We both in Fresno Juvenile Hall
    Asked Mama when judge said  my grades saved me from CYA
    Grades didn't save brother
    Outside  Fresno County Juvenile Hall
    asked Mama why she wasn't crying'
    Mama said, "Son, I might not be crying on outside but I'm crying inside."
    One time Daddy came to jail and cried to see me in handcuffs for juvenile delinquency behavior.
    Burglary, car thief, stealing gas, gang fighting, yes, honor student, the reason judge didn't send me to CYA with my brother.


    Meanwhile back in West Oakland
    niggas couldn't visit Lake Merritt
    except on 4th of July and other Holidays
    my brother said even then we could only occupy special sections of the lake

    We called Lincoln Theatre  flea house rat house
    sometimes couldn't put feet on floor for rats
    hated going there
    didn't want to go home fleas biting me
    Niggas could go to the Lux
    less fleas
    couldn't go to the Paramount Fox
    Mama said me and my brother had to go together
    I had to suffer fleas rats at Lincoln

    Granny covered me with Eucalyptus leafs from Daddy's shop
    we lived in back of  parent's florist shop
    Seventh and Campbell
    Chinese grocery across the street north
    Dangott's Loan across the street east
    Loraines's greasy spoon next to Lincoln
    hamburgers and fries  tswimming in grease
    soulfood grease
    good heart attack grease
    fries good heart attack soul food too
    Love's Loraine's
    leaving the Lincolm
    or going in

    10/12/18

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    #10 The Politics of Sports





    Although Dr. Harry Edwards supposedly pioneered the sociology of sports, Dr. Nathan Hare wrote his PhD thesis at the University of Chicago on sports, and was a professional boxer. Dr. Hare was so radical he was kicked out of a Negro college, Howard University, where he lectured on sociology and taught Black Power radical Stokely Carmichael, aka Kwame Toure'. He was partly ousted from Howard for bringing Muhammad Ali to campus after he had refused to fight in Vietnam, after all, Ali said, "The Vietcong never called me a Nigger!" Later, Howard also found Hare's boxing career unacceptable for one of their distinguished academics, so he landed at San Francisco State College/now University to become the first chair of Black and Ethnic Studies at a major American university, igniting the longest student strike in American academic history.







    Today as we replay the political history of athletes such as Muhammad Ali, Tommy Smith and John Carlos, reincarnated in the persona of Colin Kaepernich and now a host of other brothers who have suddenly awakened to the reality of life in racist, white supremacist America, despite their status as muli-million dollar running dogs for professional athletics, we are not shocked at the response of white America, led by the president who has further inflamed the torch of racism by calling the mostly Black athletes “sons of bitches.” Oh, shit, that white nationalist motherfucker Trump truly crossed the line of propriety by playing the dozens. Now you know Homey don't play dat, not with sacred holy Mother (Of God).

    For sure, the politics of American sports has reached a level never seen before, not even when Jack Johnson ignited one of the worse race riots in American history after becoming the Black heavy weight champion of the world , and after Muhammad Ali refused to serve as a running dog for American imperialism or when John Carlos and Tommy Smith gave the Black Power salute to protest American racism at the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City.

    It is indeed wonderful to see the Black athletes unite with the suffering masses of North American Africans. These brothers (and sister athletes as well) have put their careers on the line for social justice. We salute them and welcome them home.

    --Marvin X

    9/29/17


    #11 Confession of an Ex-basketball Player

    What I am about to tell you  may shock you beyond belief as I shocked DJ Davey D when I told him I was writing this essay. But it's true. It is a story of how one can transcend the illusions of life, things we thought were priority, vital to our breath of air, yet, Solomon told us when I was a child I did childish things, when I became a man , I put away childish things. Elijah Muhammad taught all his followers, including Muhammad Ali, the world was not made for sport and play. HEM's sole focus was our liberation into a nation of our own. But we must take a break, R and R, sometimes. My mentor Sun Ra asked, "Where can Black people go for R an R, i.e., rest and relaxation? Nowhere!" The best we can do is the escape of sports and entertainment to "assuage our social angst and shattered cultural striving, " said Dr. Nathan Hare.

    With all wars, even in the low intensity national liberation battle of North American Africans in their childhood and young adulthood, soldiers find sports a necessary diversion from the real world of dread, make believe and conspicuous consumption, the one trillion five billion illusions of the monkey mind Guru Bawa taught us about.

    Some of us budding soldiers came to realize sports was/is indeed a diversion from the real world that  would otherwise drive us to the brink of suicide or homicide. Like music, sports soothes the wild beast in us while stimulating our tribal instincts in athletic prowess and competition..

    As a child, teenager and college student, basketball was my life, a way to get away from home in a safe space satisfactory to my parents.  Shooting basketball probably saved me from descending totally into the precipice of juvenile delinquency, although my high school coaches bet I would fuck up before the season was over. For sure, although an A student and athlete, several times I found myself in Juvenile Hall for stealing from the snack shop at White's Theatre in Fresno CA where all Blacks went on Sundays, or barely escaped  GTA, i.e., grand theft auto, after we stole keys from cars in auto dealerships and siphoned gas so we could joy ride weekends to meet with country girls in Madera or Hanford, or attend the country fairs in Visalia and Tulare where we snatched purses from screaming white girls.

    But the question is how did I get so far away from basketball, something I loved? My basketball career began at New Century Recreation Center, next door to McFeely Elementary School, where I spent the 3rd and 4th grade in West Oakland, Harlem of the West coast. New Century's gym was my home away from home. Soon I was addicted to basketball. It became my drug of choice as a youth. FYI, at New Century I saw a dance teacher that my elementary school mind told me was a beautiful queen. I could not say she was an African queen because I knew nothing about Africa except Tarzan and Jane that I learned from movies at drive in theaters with my parents or at Whites Theatre in Fresno and the Lincoln Theatre on 7th Street in West Oakland, across the street from my parent's florist shop, where we lived in the back. Lincoln Theatre was owned or managed by a Black man, Mr. Freeman.

    The Dance teacher was Ruth Beckford who looked royal with her short natural--, yes, a natural in the 50s when we were Negroes and niggas. Black was a fighting word.
    But Ruth Beckford was black and beautiful to me. And I relished seeing her come and go from her dance classes.

    But my primary interest was basketball. When I got to Lowell Junior High, I made the team and a cheerleader tongue kissed me and scared me to death. I knew nothing about tongue kissing but she taught me. I ain't telling you her name!

    On the Lowell Junior High team was Joe Ellis who went on to play for the SF Warriors. At a basketball clinic, I won a trophy for hitting 9 of 10 at the free throw line. McClymonds star and future NBA player Paul Silos was there. I don't think he hit 9 of 10 from the free throw line!
    The Defermery Park, now Bobby Hutton Grove, basketball court separated stars from wannabees, after all Bill Russell played there, Paul Silos, Joe Ellis, Jim Hadnot, the Aliens brothers and the Pointer Sister's brothers, et al., from McClymonds, the School of Champions, pride of West Oakland and the City at large for producing so many State champions in all sports. Let me acknowledge my homeboy from Fresno, the legendary McClymond's Coach Benny Tapscott.


    In Fresno my basketball career continued at Frank H and Frank White rec centers on the West Side. We used to play at Frank White on the outside courts. Benny Tapscott was there,  along with Odell Johnson, who later starred at St. Mary's and became President of Laney College, Billy Hicks, my neighbor in the projects, Leroy Mimms, who became President of Contra Costa College in Richmond.

    A few days ago in the parking lot of a grocery market in Oakland, I recognized a brother I remembered from New Century and Defermery: he always had a braid in his hair. He was sitting at the wheel of a faded gold 1955 classic Cadillac. As I headed into the market I couldn't resist saying something to him, "Hey, bro, I remember you playing basketball at Defermery. Matter of fact, didn't you play at New Century?" He said yes. I said, "Hell, bro., you was old in the 50s as I recall. How old are you now?" He said, "91. I graduated from high school in 1944. Wasn't no Merritt College or Laney so I went to Community College in San Francisco." I was honored to be in his presence because I surely remember him, especially at Defermery as one master of the game.
    There were other brothers like Big Joe Johnson who used to use his weight to muscle into the hole at New Century and Defermery; Toliver, point guard who could dunk, AC Scott, Bobby Chapman, et al.

    In Fresno, Edison High was the school of champions. I spent my high school years on the team at Edison. I recall we played against Lemoore High School that had one black player, Tommy Smith. With five Blacks on our team, Tommy and his crew of white boys were no match, we beat their asses. I was shocked but honored when Tommy Smith raised his fist in the black power salute at the 1968 Olympics along with John Carlos, Mexico City, 1968.



    Having recounted the above, I am shocked at my self for  transcending basketball and never having seen the Warriors play?

    They won the NBA championship again tonight in Oakland. Warriors! Warriors! Warriors! Everybody loves winners. I love winners. I salute the Oakland Warriors! Oakland is the City of Warriors, City of Resistance, like Fallujah in Iraq, destroyed yet resistant--Oakland North American Africans, yes, City of Champions, Pullman Porters Union, Black Panther Party and the battle continues....
    Let the new generation take the baton, let them not reinvent the wheel but learn from Ancestor and Elder mistakes and avoid them as you move into the world of your making. Khalil Gibran said your children come through you but they are not you. You are the bow, they are the arrow!

    No, I have never watched a Warrior game or any other NBA game. I can't believe myself after spending  childhood and young adulthood playing basketball night and day, sleeping and eating basketball. I cannot believe after being on the team at Merritt College, 1962.  At Merritt my main problem was my West Oakland brothers from McClymonds, John Aikens, Jackson, Bobby Chapman, A.C. Scott, Toliver, Sunni James Shabazz, et al. I was not going into the hole with those tall brothers from McClymonds, they weren't going to elbow me in the head. After suffering a knee injury on the road, I think it was against Fresno City College, I gave up basketball and started playing tennis. Wasn't many blacks into tennis in 1963. When I beat a tall white boy on the tennis court at Merritt, he threw his racket down and walked off the court. I continued playing tennis until I taught at the University of Nevada, Reno, and my children visited me for the summer, 1979. My son, Darrel, aka Abdul (RIP), a high school tennis champ, beat me set after set and laughed all the way. It was then that I realized youth is superior to elders as per energy and strength. My son ended my tennis career forever.

    My athletic interest was rekindled when my oldest son Marvin Keith played college football as defensive end, captain of the defense. I saw him sack the quarterbacks. And this was all right with me until he thought I was the quarterback to sack as abandoned father. I was elated when he tried out for the San Francisco 49s but was cut. He didn't pursue his athletic career but went into computer programming. When he worked for PGE, he said, "Dad, do you know how much I make?" I said no son, he said, "Eight thousand dollars every two weeks." All I could say was wow. He showed me his hand computer  that controlled all the PGE computer stations in Northern California. After my son was cut from the 49rs, I had no further interest in football.
    I am happy to report that today, 10/21/18, I attended a soccer match between Cal Poly and Cal State East Bay.

    Left to Right: The Marvin X Jackmon Crew: Granddaughter Naima Joy, grandson Jahmeel, daughter Attorney Amira Jackmon, Marvin X, grandson Jordan



    Left to right: Grandfather Marvin X and grandchildren Jahmeel, Jordan and Naima
    at Cal State East Bay vs. Cal Poly soccer game 10/21/18 

    Marvin' s son Jordan, my grandson, is a member of Cal Poly's team. They won 3 to O. Jordan may have rekindled my interest in sports! All power to my grandson and his twin sister Jasmin, also a soccer player at the University of Oregon.
     Jasmin Jackmon

     Jasmin Jackmon
    10/21/18

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  • 11/01/18--19:09: Time poem by marvin x




  • Time
    final monster in our midst
    unconquerable no matter what
    time
    master all things
    living waters rivers oshuns
    we follow tides
    high tide
    low tide
    you know tide coming
    no stress
    tide come soon
    moon time
    predators
    snake wants
    raccoon bold
    fight dog
    kick dog ass
    time
    Gullah time family time
    Gullah family love
    Family compound love
    Gullah child


    sun moon stars
    time
    before time
    beyond time
    history mystery
    time
    nano time
    yesterday time
    love time
    war time
    time
    no stress time
    know thyself time
    a time to love time
    mother time
    father time
    mother father time
    time for children time
    eternal time
    mama children time
    beyond time
    mama time
    fly mama
    imagine the new world mama.
    imagine the new world.

    Time
    slipping into darkness
    time stuck
    no motion
    back forward
    Michael Jackson Moon Walk
    Sun Ra say Creator got things fixed
    don't do right thing
    can't go backward forward
    stuck on stupid
    Supper Glue on asses.
    --Marvin X
    11/1/18

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    Note# 22 Imagine A Black Nation
    In Memory of Imari Obadele, Republic of New Africa
    What happened to Nation Time, the dreams, visions, revisions, disillusions -- a time of hope
    unfulfilled, “Driftin’ and Driftin’,  like that Charles Brown blues tune, no more imagination
    beyond a return to ancient Kemet, the land we fled four thousand years ago, thus an impossible
    return, for who can go home after four thousand years except a mad Jew, and we see what
    terror he has caused upon return--Jewish nationalism, white nationalism, black nationalism,
    La Raza nationalism, Chinese nationalism, revolutionary black nationalism,et al.
    Black nationalism  is a mental drift, the most terrible kind because it tears at the heart as well
    as the mind, thus we are drenched in sweat upon awakening from the nightmare of imagination
    and must face the bright sun of reality: we have no nation, want no nation, satisfied to be lost
    and turned out on the way to grandmother's house (Whispers, Olivia).
    Shall we drift from here to eternity, for how can we avoid synchronizing our dreams with
    reality, finally and forever, standing on solid ground as we move into the future of a thousand
    tomorrows.
    Imagine a nation, a land of soul people who are healing their wounds from centuries of terror,
    who blame no one except themselves for the terror, for the ship and whip, the cross and
    lynching tree, yes, the strange fruit of the last supper in paradise, before entering the door
    of no return.
    Imagine a nation, somewhere in the South where our people died, where we can honor their
    bones and blood, shed in the sun and night, where their spirits still dance in the swamp
    and river bottoms, the plantations and huts still standing, where spirits go wild in the wind
    and in the stillness of summer.
    Imagine a nation, perhaps Up South in the wicked cities that defied the hope and dreams
    of generations, maybe there we shall declare ourselves free and claim sovereignty, a place
    called the Republic of Pan Africa, like Brooklyn. where we have gathered for the first time
    in four thousand years, de facto capital of the Diaspora,  coming from Mississippi, North
    and South Carolina Africans, Jamaica and Haitian Africans, Nigerian, Ghanaian and
    Senegalese, bound together again, this time forever on Fulton Street and streets too many
    to name.
    And yes, there is pain and rivalry,  jealousy and envy, love and hate in the night, but we are
    there in the sun, in the snow, a nation not yet standing, not fully sensing our power, strength,
    the full strength of a mighty nation forced together again, not since fleeing the pyramids and
    pharaohs, the murders for succession, the flight of queens with sons and daughters who did
    not assume the throne. And there was drought and famine forcing them up the Nile,
    the mighty Congo and Niger.
    Imagine, the Republic of Pan Africa, not the nationalism of fools, but the product of
    engineers, planners and builders who began with a thought centuries ago in the cane,
    cotton and rice fields, the woods of Nat Turner, Gabriel Prosser, Denmark Vesey, the
    railroad of Harriet Tubman, the womanhood of Sojourner Truth, but caught, yes, as
    Rev.James Cone (RIP)  said, between the cross and lynching tree.
    But it was the thought that refused to die, yet resurrected every season like the Nile,
    the dream of the homeland where we must be taken in once again. Have we not paid for
    this land with sweat, blood and tears? It is ours so claim the portion we desire, stand upon
    the ground and cry liberty or death, but have we not died a million times, even now at this
    hour we crucify ourselves for failing to stand tall as full men and women, our children
    annihilate themselves like Buddhist monks on fire in Vietnam, only because we have not
    passed on ancestor tales of liberty and freedom, discipline and work.
    Imagine a nation, days of absence from our animal selves, and the donning of our divinity,
    wherein we hate each other no more, never again, the jealousy, the Willie Lynch syndrome,
    Yacoub’s children playing with steel, some genetic defect in our divine nature.
    Imagine a nation, removed from those we cannot live with in peace, thus we part from them
    and their wickedness, taking with us only the genius of our minds, for look at the fruit of our
    labor under the sun, surely we can do the same for ourselves as we did for the master,
    transcending the pyramids with our original creations in the now and tomorrow.
    But the question is not if but when America falls, what is the post-American plan for North
    American Africans? Will we finally acquire sovereignty as a nation of self-determined people,
    will we secure a land base with access to the sea, and minerally rich for our centuries of free
    and nearly free labor under the sun? Or will we sit with while other ethnic groups secure the
    division of this stolen property called the united snakes of america..
    Native Americans will want equity for thievery,  their fair share, along with Latinos, Asians
    and poor whites—will the so called Negro sit around waiting for the Master to return, or
    will he go about, finally and without hesitation, doing for self, reconstructing his fallen cities,
    getting control of the infrastructure, water, electricity, roads, schools, workplaces, airports,
    taxes, security? We have done it for the white man, 2019 shall be the 400 year celebration of
    our landing in this wilderness of North America. Are we prepared to report to God, ancestors,
    elders, adults, children on our condition after being kidnapped 400 years ago, 1619.
    Long ago we called for Black Power, but with the coming fall of America, we shall have the
    opportunity to fulfill our dreams. Oh, it cannot happen? America is too strong. Firstly, you
    have no real idea how strong America is just as you have no idea how strong you are—you
    are so full of fear you cannot and never have been able to think straight. Every thought
    you ever thought has been wrong simply because it was not thinking outside the box of
    Americana,                                              because you have been confined to the box and never
    had a chance to consider the configuration of your society except for your 19th century
    thinkers and dreamers, and your 20th century thinkers and planners. Garvey and Elijah
    Muhammad. Imari dreamed of the Republic of New Africa.
    Nations come and go, where is Egypt, Rome, Greece, Great Britain and the Soviet Union?
    Does the Chinaman have a chance today--you haven't heard that racist remark recently,
    for the Chinese have a very good chance to rule the world. so why do you think America
    shall remain forever and forever in its present condition?
    It will absolutely change because its ethnic minorities shall soon become the majority.
    Why are not your leaders planning for the future and our well-deserved fair share?
    If and when  America, as did the Soviet Union, falls apart, what do you want? A job?
    A job, a job!
    You mean after 400 years of free and nearly free labor, you only desire a job? Are you crazy,
    are you totally insane or just lazy, like a whore awaiting marching orders from her pimp—
    not knowing the pimp is dead, he was killed in a shootout with rivals. Your leaders, why are
    they running around licking the behinds of the the Democratic and Republican parties rather
    than establishing an independent political entity that will take us into the future?
    They shall be charged for their shortsightedness, their myopia of the mind.

    Our goal should not be to achieve parity with white Americans (which is mediocrity, at best),
    but with India and China. We should forget about equality with Americans and see the global
    picture and imagine our role in it. But we are so blinded by white supremacy that all we see is
    white, white, white. Look around, the world is no longer white. Power will not be white in the
    not so distant future—can you look ahead a few days and plan accordingly or shall you sit on
    your behinds awaiting the crumbs from the fall of America?

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     Harlem New York reception for Marvin X at the home of poet Rashidah Ishmaili, 2014. Marvin X was in NYC to speak at the New York University memorial for poets Jayne Cortez and Amiri Baraka.

    Maestro Marvin X with the Black Arts Movement Poets Choir and Arkestra, including David Murray, Earle Davis, Val Serrat, et al., Malcolm X Jazz/Art Festival, Oakland CA
    photo Adam Turner/Gene Hazzard


    Talkin' Ignut poem




    Would you prefer a black Communist or black Capitalist regime
    Black Muslim
    Super Sunni
    Iranian Shia
    Saudi Arabian Israeli ISIS
    Yoruba
    Hebrew
    Voodoo
    Hoodoo 
    Doodoo
    Gay lesbian trans
    Jesus saves Saviours
    Social Democratic Republican gangsta
    Scientology Farrakhan
    Back to Egypt back to the moon
    Back to back
    Wakanda multicultural
    Me too him too
    Ho's tricks too
    Priests boys too
    Women dogs too
    What a wonderful world
    Can't we all just
    Have some Pizza
    --MARVIN X
    11/5/18

    Can I hear some black music 

    Can I hear some Black music
    Not fusion Miller Lite
    Mexican soul music
    Mi corazon
    Black music
    Not white hippie hip hop
    Black jazz 
    Coltrane Billie Bessie
    Blues
    Cotton field blues
    Cane field
    Rice blues 
    Chicago pain
    Urban blues
    Fillmore Street 7th Street Oakland Blues
    Hammond B 3 Blues supreme
    Jimmy Smith
    Earl Father Hines jazz blues
    Josephine Baker Slim Jenkin's blues
    John Singer Pullman Porter Union Hall Blues
    No water down blues
    Give me national anthem 
    Lift every voice and sing blues.
    --MARVIN X
    11/5/28

    Love Letter to Ann Williams

    Ann
    can you believe a nigger can love you for fifty years
    in silence
    from 1962 til now
    your black beauty was supreme then and now
    your intelligence
    quiet character in the midst of madmen supreme
    your partner turned out to be the maddest of all
    Beyond Donald/Khalid
    beyond Huey, Bobby
    Ken Freeman, Isaac Moore, Ernie Allen, Maurice Dawson Judy Juanity
    Ann
    I won't call his name because he honored me
    first to recognize me as writer
    introduced me to Huey Newton

    you were cool through it all
    black velvet beauty
    sustained years of terror death betrayal 
    jealousy envy
    Was it your West Oakland spirit
    like mine
    codified in Harlem of the West
    Defermery Park
    McClymonds
    New Century
    Lincoln Theatre
    John Singer's Pool Hall/Bar
    upstairs
    C.L. Dellums  and the Pullman Porters Union
    Nephew Ron Dellums
    sometimes we can't come close to elders
    we try we try
    I thought I was better than my father
    what a fool
    people told me I sounded like my father
    Thought I was a Garveyite Black nationalist
    on my own
    Paul Cobb told me my dad used to attend Garvey meetings
    at his grandfather's house in West Oakland
    Ann 
    cool quiet woman
    called upon to listen
    Donald Warden ranted on and on in your ear on telephone
    He loved your quiet black beauty
    unsurpassed unequal
    even today
    last days of Babylon
    you are here
    standing tall
    royal african beauty and intelligence
    queen of the bay
    quiet storm
    I love you 
    just know that
    warrior woman
    West Oakland Queen
    Ann Williams
    Better  ax somebody!
    --Marvin X
    11/5/18

    0 0




    We want reparations for every ounce of white blood in North American Americans
    rape blood not love blood
    Vicious rapist white man blood
    1619 blood
    Good Ship Jesus Pilgrim John Hawkins Amazing Grace blood
    Pay the cost
    Massa  charlie boss capt.
    pay yo pussy bill billy boy
    Can you pay
    Make America great again pay
    you so great again pay
    slave hut floor blood pay
    mama cry in da nite blood pay
    call mama yellow wench
    cut baby out mama belly pay
    mama recalcitrant rebellious uppity yellow wench pay
    yellow wench plot slave revolt wit Gabriel Prosser
    read Black Thunder Black Thunder
    Pay white man bitch fa every nigga wit blue eyes pay
    raped nigga for devil blue eyed black children pay
    sold new year's day New York African Village wall auction
    Wall Street still auction block
    Rev. Cecil Williams Glide Church say pay
    Cecil make 'em pay
    Love you Daddy C
    Did everything fa me
    Set Tenderloin free
    Cept JB JB JB
    Can't save nigga don't wanna be free
    can't make donkey stallion
    white blood nigga still nigga

    Blond hair nigga still nigga pay
    Pay fa every blond hair wig wearing nigga today
    blond hair wig wearing niggas from America to Africa pay
    bleaching cream ebony magazine mulatto bitches pay
    for every ounce bleaching cream sold to niggas of yo creation pay
    Amiri Baraka say pay for every hurtful thing you said and did pay
    Urban plantation niggas sick wit whiteness pay
    Pay fa Othello Color Purple Colored Girls Dutchman Butler 12 Years a Slave Roots Amistad 
    Pay for every black dream of white desire
    Pay poison white supremacist education
    Religion
    Politics economics 
    no manhood womanhood training pay
    Pay DNA smart ass white boy
    becky pay too
    white woman white man in drag
    Once of white blood nigga white right
    America pay
    empty fort knox
    empty federal reserve pay.
    Marvin X
    11/7/18

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    Comment on Marvin X  Ancestors Poem 
    by Omolade R. Roddy
    amen...?

    o.k, amen 

    whoa....heavy

    o.k, so for a second I was getting all caught up w/ the the language ....the words.... and I couldn't seem to get over this wal that was anging strong around my consciousness

    deflectin' what you were trying to say (or what you were sayin' and I was tryin' not to get)... becuz' of whatever was comin' up for me around seeing and hearing the word "ancestors" being wrapped in this cloak of "motherfuckers...whores" et al....

    so I was skimming through it all.....pickin' up pieces and depth here and there. 

    you have always been pretty heavy, so I was like..

    "ok, here we go, ummm, I know.. he's gonna go there and I don't if i'm able or if I know if I can allow myself to go that deep."

    then I had to consciously stop....and make myself read it all over again..

    this time, line by line...

    savoring it like quinine or some other bitter tonic. 

    and then actually,when I allowed myself to be and really sit w/ the discomfort of it... (as silly as that sounds) ...

    I found it to be really beautiful...

    a marvinx-esque like beautiful, but beautiful.
    nonetheless.

    thanks baba

    --Omolade R. Roddy
    --------------------

    Ancestors
    Marvin X
    Ancestors
    Who are the real motherfuckers
    who fucked our fathers and mothers
    kidnapped Motherland Africa  to good ship jesus
    door of no return
    sea of blood bones
    sharks and wail
    imagine stench piss feces period blood
    starvation suicide ocean revolution
    we land in the Carolinas
    enjoy 
    five hundred years
    duty free labor
    sent by ancestor kings and queens
    who sold us to the ghost
    Baraka teaches us
    ancestors we call you in the name of nigguhs
    black nigguhs in the hoods of america
    not pseudo black kemetic niggas fakes and frauds
    scared to see the new royal children imperial kings and queens of the realm
    too blind by the sun of Ra to find a bone at the Pyramid
    you are horrified garbage at the door of King Tut's pyramid
    coca cola bottoms condoms
    remains of grave robbing tourists
    The Misri people (aka, Egyptians) told Sun Ra and his Arkestra
    this is not our land
    this is your land
    your creations
    yet North American Africans search in vain for their lost identity
    year after year
    when the whole earth is ours
    Africa
    Arabia
    Asia
    Americas
    Europe
    black man's land

    Gullahland America Africa Carolinas
    Senagalease rice Africans in American slave system
    hear talk on how rice came to America
    rice plantations in Africa
    see Gullah basket weave 
    enjoy Gullahland land
    Africa in Mississippi Alabama Georgia
    Can't leave out New Orleans Africa
    Harlem Africa Brooklyn Southside Chicago Detroit St. Louis Los Angeles Oakland San Francisco 
    take claim to the land and forever hold your tongues
    dig the pyramids of Louisiana for Moorish mounds
    Seminoles of Florida Maroon Nation Africans Native Americans
    Gullahs  Geeches up and down the coast
    All Gullahs ain't Geeches
    All Geeches ain't Gullahs
    Emancipation Reconstruction
    North American African Nation
    decreed all land from South Carolina to Florida
    fucked by the motherfucker
    king and queen motherfucker and son of bitch
    male rape child rape mother rape
    allowed by king and queen
    ancestors all guilty and charged
    Sun Ra said they got to pay
    Africa got to pay like the white man devil
    yeah, Africa pay
    you got the gold diamonds precious metals everywhere
    pay
    stop paying europe and pay the negro
    the motherfucker you made with the red flag
    guiding him to the shore through the door of no return
    that bitch warrior you allowed to be raped in front of his women and children
    that whore who kept us alive while sexing the master
    who wanted all the women men and children
    greedy bastard
    and talk of clean english
    fuck the english language
    fuck every word of it
    and fuck you too 
    you speak it 
    and love it
    and seek to purify it with you fake asses
    claiming ancestor holiness
    let the ancestors be cursed for their iniquities
    and debaucheries
    the selling of souls in the centuries of time
    yet you call them holy
    call Mississippi holy
    call Alabama Georgia Louisiana Carolina's holy ground
    the marsh swamp bayous rivers creeks
    holy trees of strange fruit and blood wine
    call the ancestors from the woods and forests
    call them from the pine trees and moss wood swamps
    call them from the rice canefields cotton
    from plantation and city of death in the family
    Clara said she wanted to put her head in the oven
    in the detroit of her time
    Elijah was drunk as a coot she said
    when Master Fard came selling red silk
    the same red we followed to the shore
    when the king sold us to the ghost, Baraka said
    he told us about the railroad in the bottom of ocean
    filled with bones
    ancestor bones who resisted and wailed cried and shitted
    not only tongues but vile moans shouts screams to the motherfucker
    the son of a bitch ancestor
    who pitted tribe against tribe warrior against warrior
    man against woman for trinkets and barrels of rum
    and we yet praise them
    in our abject ignorance
    we praise the culture of madness and gold
    madness and diamonds
    madness and chopped hands clitoris legs
    and there is no end even today
    the kings and queens are alive and well
    working overtime to feed themselves full
    as we whore and rape each other into the night of the full moon
    where the silence is aloud and heard the world over
    the silence of hunger and disease
    silence of ignorance and demands to be king for life
    to never end the terror
    to never avenge the righteous
    to continue the plunder until the new kingdom comes
    and the wicked are reduced to dust
    and the motherfucker receives his fucking
    Amen.
    --Marvin X
    4.17.09


    WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2018



    Oh, Ancestors Speak to Me! Digame Por favor

    Oh, Ancestors Speak to Me




    "Marvin, this is a Beautiful Poem. I saw myself in it and others that I know in it."


    --Jerry Varnado, San Francisco State University Strike leader, 1968

    Oh, Ancestors Speak to Me
    Digame
    Digame
    Digame
    por favor
    speak to me
    my legs cannot move if you do not speak
    your voice is the spirit in my walk in my soul
    I cannot move without your direction
    digame
    digame por favor
    you guided me then departed
    I am here alone in this wilderness
    shall I be ashamed alone
    can I walk without trembling
    you stood so long
    I thought forever you would hold my hand
    strengthen my knees
    you taught me don't get weak
    stand tall
    stay solid don't bend
    solid
    you told me in prison
    Allah loves a soldier
    hates cowards
    Allah loves warriors
    hates cowards
    stay solid
    don't bend

    Oh Batin
    speak
    digame
    Ali Sharif Bey
    speak Islam
    Sunni Shia Ahmaddia Sufi
    Nation of Islam
    speak
    polytheism  Islam
    Tell me
    black stone rejected
    corner stone
    we black stone
    rejected despised
    socalled Negro
    tool fool of the world
    black stone
    corner stone
    yes Paradise Jahlove teach
    they love everything about you but you
    Lou Rawls say
    what did you do to be
    so black and blue
    crucified on the cross and lynching tree of America, world
    Ancestor Rev. James Cone
    we love you
    liberation theology supreme
    a love supreme
    a love supreme
    Rev. James Cone
    Jesus socalled Negro
    crucified daily
    can't drink coffee Starbucks
    can't breathe
    we here for you
    can't breathe
    can't talk walk
    we hear
    speak ancestors
    digame
    por favor
    digame
    speak from shanties tent cities speak
    speak Mexico city dirt floor huts
    speak Belize flying roaches
    no black flag
    let roaches live
    digame Jamaica
    digame Trinidad
    digame Venezuela
    speak
    tin roof huts
    speak poor but happy
    speak Mexico
    Speak Belize Honduras
    speak Afro-Columbia
    speak Tenderloin San Francisco
    my home
    cardboard box home Crack fiend
    love in cardboard box
    smoke crack
    crack ho recite fatiha in Arabic
    give head cardboard box love
    homeless love
    Oh, Tenderloin
    I claim every alley doorway hindu hilton hotel
    what alley I do not know
    what doorway
    what bus stop BART station line to line
    tell me of cold winter nights East Bay Terminal
    There with my brothers
    Edward
    Nadar
    Squirrel
    Muslims on the bottom
    Supreme wisdom Muslims
    on the bottom
    I got it but didn't get it
    Supreme Wisdom
    How can I escapeTenderloin
    dope fiends of every kind
    good lovin' ho's
    she married her ho' at Glide Church
    put dat ho' on the street same night
    took me home to smoke crack
    no man in her house before me
    lesbian pimp ho' bitch
    no man in her house before me good pimpin' ass bitch

    I live on bottom of the world
    sea to sea
    country to country
    religion to religion
    politics to politics
    ideology to ideology
    no matter Left Right

    Digame
    speak to me
    I stand on shoulders
    walk on feet
    dream dreams you dreamed
    No original thoughts beyond thoughts of freedom
    I shall not betray you
    sacred dreams not lost in madness of globalism
    we are not PC diaper baby snow flakes
    suffering micro aggression
    stand tall
    we endured FOI officials in Chicago
    Supreme Captain Raymond Sharieff
    National Secretary John Ali
    Captain Elijah Muhamad
    baddest niggas in the world
    except when I got home to SF and Guru Alonzo Batin
    said I was a punk motherfucker to confess to niggas worse than I could ever b
    Batin said I was a punk bitch ass nigga for confessing to rats snakes vipers cobras
    Batin gave manhood training
    Black Arts West/Black House San Francisco
    teach  Batin
    Criminal Muslim supreme
    Heroin addict
    Imam in prison
    addict/iman big yard
    true believer
    can't pimp Batin
    call him hypocrite Muslim
    think for self Muslim
    gangster Muslim
    true to the game
    game true to you
    Batin
    stand on your shoulders
    devoured your bean soup
    wheat bread butter honey
    Whiting fish
    all night long science
    marijuana science marijuana
    Speak Batin
    Speak Ali Sheriff Bey
    Speak Aaron Ali
    Master Teacher linguistics
    Speak Brother Edward
    raised us from  dead at San Francisco State University
    UC Berkeley San Jose State University
    Speak Brother Edward blessed us with supreme wisdom when we were deaf dumb blind playing bid whist in cafeteria at San Francisco State University.
    Digame
    Digame
    Digame!
    --Marvin X
    5/4/18



    0 0







    Poets write to keep from killing, homicide or suicide, two sides of the coin of death. Most often, poets kill when they can't express themselves with words. If and when poets are political, when they refuse to write poems for the king and queen and defy court patronage, and persist in critiquing contradictions of the royal court, the king and queen has no use for them and they may be forced to flee their homeland or suffer prison or death even since no kingdoms based on lies can allow poets to speak the truth.

    We have written about the symbiotic relationship between poets and politicians, although this symbiosis can become dysfunctional when the poet transcends the narrative of the royal regime, especially those king/queen for life regimes that forbid opposition. See Parable of the Parrot, Parable of Trinkets and Gadgets, Parable of Black Man and Block Man by Marvin X.

    The poet who speaks only truth cannot be tolerated by any regime based on lies. Wicked regimes only love poets and artists who perform as pharaoh's magicians, sycophants willing to promote the royal narrative for kibbles and bits, crumbs from Pharaoh's table. The recalcitrant poets who are determined to be obstinate and incorrigible must be silenced or disposed permanently.

    The wicked regimes become relentless in their effort to silence any narrative that contradicts the official one. Poet, writers, journalists, singers, actors, must not transcend the royal regime's propaganda machine. To do so is often called treason or sedition at the very least, which means saying anything not in agreement with the royal order.

    Do not speak of the king in the negative, even if and when he is negative. When the poet cannot submit to the royal order, the symbiotic relationship is no longer tenable and must be severed for the good of the kingdom. The poet becomes a banned person. No one must speak with him, no one must read his books. He is a danger to society and to himself since he refuses to submit to the rules and regulations, policies and precepts of the royal order. He is labeled agitator, opposition, revolutionary, thus a danger to the security of the state, even his books are dangerous and fictional characters must be rounded up and incarcerated for crimes against the state. I am thinking of the Kenyan writer Ngugi wa Thiongo. In Native Son, the lawyer said, "Every glance of the eye is a threat; his very presence is a crime against the state." He was not speaking of an artist but the oppressed man, Bigger Thomas. But in the manner of Ngugi, was not only his characters but Richard Wright himself was a danger to society and died in mysterious circumstances in Paris?

    And them came James Baldwin deposing Richard Wright of the Black literary heavyweight championship. And Baldwin did great until The Fire Next Time when he got the bright idea to interview the Most Honorable Elijah Muhammad. Pharaoh said enough! Shut the fuck up, we don't care if you gay or straight, shut the fuck up. Baldwin wouldn't shut up. I was blessed to interview him in his apartment across from Central Park, New York, a cold December, 1968: he had no heat in his apartment. Among other things, he said to me, "How dare they talk about the Prince of Peace while they bomb the hell out of  Vietnam! Your condition proves they don't believe in Jesus, Prince of Peace. Just look at your condition. It's a miracle for a black father to raise a son in these conditions and I applaud the fathers who are able to do so. Nothing else happened here except us, nothing else happened. It's a wonder we all haven't gone stark raving mad!"

    --Marvin X
    11/7/18
    \


    0 0

    Oh, Ancestors Speak to Me




    "Marvin, this is a Beautiful Poem. I saw myself in it and others that I know in it."

    --Jerry Varnado, San Francisco State University Strike leader, 1968

    Oh, Ancestors Speak to Me
    Digame
    Digame
    Digame
    por favor
    speak to me
    my legs cannot move if you do not speak
    your voice is the spirit in my walk in my soul
    I cannot move without your direction
    digame
    digame por favor
    you guided me then departed
    I am here alone in this wilderness
    shall I be ashamed alone
    can I walk without trembling
    you stood so long
    I thought forever you would hold my hand
    strengthen my knees
    you taught me don't get weak
    stand tall
    stay solid don't bend
    solid
    you told me in prison
    Allah loves a soldier
    hates cowards
    Allah loves warriors
    hates cowards
    stay solid
    don't bend

    Oh Batin
    speak
    digame
    Ali Sharif Bey
    speak Islam
    Sunni Shia Ahmaddia Sufi
    Nation of Islam
    speak
    polytheism  Islam
    Tell me
    black stone rejected
    corner stone
    we black stone
    rejected despised
    socalled Negro
    tool fool of the world
    black stone
    corner stone
    yes Paradise Jahlove teach
    they love everything about you but you
    Lou Rawls say
    what did you do to be
    so black and blue
    crucified on the cross and lynching tree of America, world
    Ancestor Rev. James Cone
    we love you
    liberation theology supreme
    a love supreme
    a love supreme
    Rev. James Cone
    Jesus socalled Negro
    crucified daily
    can't drink coffee Starbucks
    can't breathe
    we here for you
    can't breathe
    can't talk walk
    we hear
    speak ancestors
    digame
    por favor
    digame
    speak from shanties tent cities speak
    speak Mexico city dirt floor huts
    speak Belize flying roaches
    no black flag
    let roaches live
    digame Jamaica
    digame Trinidad
    digame Venezuela
    speak
    tin roof huts
    speak poor but happy
    speak Mexico
    Speak Belize Honduras
    speak Afro-Columbia
    speak Tenderloin San Francisco
    my home
    cardboard box home Crack fiend
    love in cardboard box
    smoke crack
    crack ho recite fatiha in Arabic
    give head cardboard box love
    homeless love
    Oh, Tenderloin
    I claim every alley doorway hindu hilton hotel
    what alley I do not know
    what doorway
    what bus stop BART station line to line
    tell me of cold winter nights East Bay Terminal
    There with my brothers
    Edward
    Nadar
    Squirrel
    Muslims on the bottom
    Supreme wisdom Muslims
    on the bottom
    I got it but didn't get it
    Supreme Wisdom
    How can I escapeTenderloin
    dope fiends of every kind
    good lovin' ho's
    she married her ho' at Glide Church
    put dat ho' on the street same night
    took me home to smoke crack
    no man in her house before me
    lesbian pimp ho' bitch
    no man in her house before me good pimpin' ass bitch

    I live on bottom of the world
    sea to sea
    country to country
    religion to religion
    politics to politics
    ideology to ideology
    no matter Left Right

    Digame
    speak to me
    I stand on shoulders
    walk on feet
    dream dreams you dreamed
    No original thoughts beyond thoughts of freedom
    I shall not betray you
    sacred dreams not lost in madness of globalism
    we are not PC diaper baby snow flakes
    suffering micro aggression
    stand tall
    we endured FOI officials in Chicago
    Supreme Captain Raymond Sharieff
    National Secretary John Ali
    Captain Elijah Muhamad
    baddest niggas in the world
    except when I got home to SF and Guru Alonzo Batin
    said I was a punk motherfucker to confess to niggas worse than I could ever b
    Batin said I was a punk bitch ass nigga for confessing to rats snakes vipers cobras
    Batin gave manhood training
    Black Arts West/Black House San Francisco
    teach  Batin
    Criminal Muslim supreme
    Heroin addict
    Imam in prison
    addict/iman big yard
    true believer
    can't pimp Batin
    call him hypocrite Muslim
    think for self Muslim
    gangster Muslim
    true to the game
    game true to you
    Batin
    stand on your shoulders
    devoured your bean soup
    wheat bread butter honey
    Whiting fish
    all night long science
    marijuana science marijuana
    Speak Batin
    Speak Ali Sheriff Bey
    Speak Aaron Ali
    Master Teacher linguistics
    Speak Brother Edward
    raised us from  dead at San Francisco State University
    UC Berkeley San Jose State University
    Speak Brother Edward blessed us with supreme wisdom when we were deaf dumb blind playing bid whist in cafeteria at San Francisco State University.
    Digame
    Digame
    Digame!
    --Marvin X
    5/4/18

    0 0

    Marvin X's Academy of da Corner, Lakeshore, is rapidly becoming the hottest intellectual gathering spot in Oakland for inter-generational and ecumenical discussion. By early afternoon on Saturdays, men and women gather for a free flowing discussion on any topic of interest. Chairs have been donated so people can sit in a semi-circle behind the Master Teacher's table  of conscious literature, including his own writings, the works of Drs. Nathan and Julia Hare, and other black classical conscious writings. As newcomers arrive, Marvin announces, "This is a sacred space for all points of view. Jesus is on my right (referring to a Christian brother). On the right of Jesus is Muhammad. Next to Muhammad is Buddha, newt to him is Scientology. On my left is Hebrew, to his left is Rasta. No killing allowed in this sacred space. All are free to express their minds. When women arrive, they are welcome to participate in the conversation." The participants nod in agreement  Marvin X is the facilitator. Sometimes there is conversation on both sides of his book table, mostly when customers arrive who know each other. Marvin does not try to dominate the conversation as if he is Mr. Know it All. People come by and drop a donation in the jar, maybe for some person who got a book for free. Others drop a donation into the jar on a regular basis as well as donate conscious books.

    A white woman said she passed  by in her car and seeing the stand, parked and came to see what was happening as the book stand was unusual for Oakland, although Marvin has operated Academy of da Corner for years at 14th and Broadway, downtown Oakland. Marvin told the woman his Academy is East coast style vending of conscious literature, more often seen on the streets of Harlem, Brooklyn, Newark, Philly and elsewhere. When on tour, Marvin X sets up shop in all these locations.

    On Lakeshore, Academy of da Corner is morphing into a regular discussion of spirituality as opposed to religiosity in the usual dogmatic manner. Brothers and sisters talk in a civilized manner, perhaps because of the calm manner of the host that remains so lately because brothers bring their music, jazz in particular, that no doubt soothes the wild beast of dogmatism and sectarianism. Today the music was Jimmy Smith, Miles Davis and John Coltrane. The teacher did not object when a brother from Los Angeles put on some rap music, Harbor City Krip rap.

    In the days ahead, we shall see how the Lakeshore Academy addresses critical issues. A white man passed and after seeing the anti-trump poster, told the group that President Trump had lowered the employment rate of North American Africans. Responding to the man, Marvin said, "That's the last thing we need is a job. We came here 400 years ago to do a job."

    At the entrance of the Trader Joe's parking lot, a homeless man spilled his shopping cart. When people tried to be negative with the man picking up his belongings, Marvin said, "They can talk about the man if they, but most people are only a paycheck away from pushing a shopping cart."

    During today's conversation, Marvin X interviewed for the second time by his nephew for a grad school project to obtain his MSW.

    On November 27, Marvin X will speak at his alma mater, San Francisco State University, in Davey D's Hip Hop Class. On December 5, he will read at the Beat Museum, along with poets in an anti-capitalist anthology. The reading is from 7-9pm. The Beat Museum is located in San Francisco's North Beach, Columbus and Broadway.

    Marvin X also found time to meet with his book design editor, Adam Turner, for a final proof reading of his forthcoming essays. The poet is scheduled to read from Notes  of Artistic Freedom Fighter Marvin X, December 15, Charles Wright Museum, Detroit, MI.









    Marvin X is now available for booking coast to coast. Send letter of invitation to jmarvinx@yahoo.com.


    0 0

    SOWK 506: 2018-19
    Assignment 3: Life History Interview
    Monti Hall
    November 18, 2018
    Professor Alice Cepeda


    Marvin X and Monti Hall
    Academy of da Corner, Lakeshore
    Oakland CA







    Introduction


    Some people dropped out of the rat race many years ago and never reentered the so called ordinary. One such person is Marvin X (née Marvin Ellis Jackmon, born May 29,1944 ), 74-year-old African American male poet, playwright, essayist,  educator, publisher, entrepreneur, director, and lecturer.

    This paper will examine Marvin’s life and work based on two personal interviews (conducted November 4, 2018 and November 17, 2018). It will focus on Marvin’s experience as a child and adult and how they influence his current beliefs and behaviors. A large focus of Marvin’s interviews related to race due to his experiences growing up and the influence of the black power movement on his ideology. Marvin X encouraged the use of his name to help promote his books. While discussing Marvin X’s life history and development, this paper will explore multiple theories, including: Conflict Theory; Critical Race Theory; Intersectionality; and Social Learning Theory. With an aging population it is important for the social worker to be able to understand these various theories.  Being able to identify intersectionality issues can be important in dealing with diverse groups, such as a Native American woman in looking for a job, as an example.  Each theory will be explained and the experiences and viewpoints of Marvin X will be incorporated.

    Narrative

    Some of Marvin X’s earliest memories are of  sitting and watching his parents put together a newspaper they published in Fresno, California during the 1950s. The Fresno Voice was the only Black newspaper in the area at the time. Marvin X was born in Fowler CA, nine miles south of Fresno in the central valley of California. Back then many African Americans worked in grape vineyards and cotton fields throughout the valley.

    His parents were, “woke and conscious of Black Nationalism in the Marcus Garvey way” (X, personal communication, November 17, 2018).  He shares one personal story about his dog.  The family moved back and forth from Fresno to Oakland. On one of these moves from Oakland to Fresno, his dog ran away upon arrival in Fresno. He wrote about his dog in the Aunt Elsie's Children Section of the Oakland Tribune..  Marvin has not had a dog since then for fear it might run away.

    The family lived on the west side of Fresno in an all black community.  “Whether they were the principal or postman, if they were black, they lived in the projects” (X, personal communication, November 17, 2018).  Fresno was an agricultural town and Marvin X worked the fields, as did his great grandfather, grandparents, mother, uncles and most black people cutting grapes picking and  chopping cotton.  He remembers this as his earliest hustle.

    When living in Oakland, his family resided in West Oakland on 7th Street, where they operated a florist shop across from the Lincoln Theatre, a black theatre.  According to Marvin X, Oakland was Harlem of the West coast.  Segregated communities were the ordinary during the 1940s and 1950s. California had economic barriers along with other racial boundaries. Marvin X uses the example of offering only houses within these boundaries for sale to people of color. This practice is illegal now and called Red Lining.  His mother sold many homes to people of color in west Fresno.  Marvin X witnessed this firsthand during his teen years at his mother’s real estate office.

    While the Brown Vs. The Board of Education Supreme Court decision called for integrated schools, it is still a segregated society.  The schools were community based and busing out of an area was still almost 20 years away in Fresno. Marvin attended all black schools including graduating from Edison High School. For decades this school produced most black graduates in Fresno. 

    In 1967, under the influence of Elijah Muhammad, Marvin became a Black Muslim and has published since then under the names El Muhajir and Marvin X. His recent books include Land of My Daughters: Poems, Wish I Could Tell You the Truth: Essays, et al. Marvin X would go on to say that Elijah Muhammad was the most influential person in his life.

    Marvin attended Oakland’s Merritt College where he encountered fellow students who became Black Panther Party co-founders Bobby Seale and Huey Newton. They extended his black nationalism.

    Marvin’s first play, Flowers for the Trashman, was produced by the Drama department at San Francisco State University, 1965.  He dropped out to establish his own Black Arts West Theatre in the Fillmore, 1966, along with playwright Ed Bullins. Months later Marvin co-founded the political/cultural center called Black House with Eldridge Cleaver, 1967.

    Marvin introduced Eldridge Cleaver to Huey Newton and Bobby Seale.  Eldridge immediately joined the Black Panther Party.  Huey Newton said, “Marvin X was my teacher, many of our comrades came from his Black Arts Theatre: Bobby Seale, Eldridge Cleaver, Emory Douglas and Samuel Napier.” Eldridge Cleaver remained a close friend of Marvin X until his death.

    One of the movers and shakers of the Black Arts Movement (BAM) Marvin X has published 30 books, including essays, poetry, and his autobiography Somethin’ Proper. Important books include Fly to Allah, poems, Beyond Religion, toward Spirituality, essays on consciousness, and How to Recover from the Addiction to White Supremacy, a manual based on the 12 step Recovery model.

    Marvin received his MA in English/Creative writing from San Francisco State University, 1975. He has taught at San Francisco State University, Fresno State University, UC Berkeley and San Diego, Mills College, Merritt and Laney Colleges in Oakland, University of Nevada, Reno.  He lectures coast to coast at such colleges and universities as University of Arkansas, University of Houston, Morehouse and Spelman, Atlanta, University of Virginia, Howard University, University of Pennsylvania, Temple University, Medgar Evers College in Brooklyn, University of Massachusetts.  According to Marvin X, his lectures often  end with him being, “usually escorted out, snatched the mike or arrested” (X, personal communication, November 17, 2018). His style fires up a crowd.

    His latest book is the Wisdom of Plato Negro, parables/fables, Black Bird Press, Berkeley. He currently teaches at his Academy of da Corner, 14th and Broadway, downtown Oakland. This interview took place at his alternate location on Lakeshore Drive near Lake Merritt in Oakland. On this day a representative of the Nation of Islam along with a college student were hanging around Marvin X’s Academy. It is recommended that each visitor bring his own chair, but there are donated ones available.  The Master Teacher provided me a seat at the table. Class was in session as others stopped by and lingered talking.

    His most popular publication is a booklet named Mythology of Pussy and Dick. This publication explores the power of women and tells men they cannot own women as chattel property.  Marvin X poses this as fundamental to manhood and womanhood training. Ishmael Reed says, “Marvin X is Plato teaching on the streets of Oakland."

    Theoretical Analysis

    There are a few key theories related to Marvin X’s life and development: conflict theory, critical race theory, intersectionality, and social learning theory. While none of these theories applies perfectly to Marvin X’s life, taken together they offer a holistic analysis of Marvin X’s lifetime development.

    Conflict Theory

    Marvin X belief that the world is in constant conflict fits Conflict Theory.  There is much conflict within the world of Marvin X and race matters are at the forefront. This is a continuous and often contentious issue that has dominated the poet's life since his earliest memories. Marvin believes that anything short of separating the races is unacceptable. White people or as he calls them white devils, cannot help themselves with being evil. White people are inherently seeking power over people of color.  This is the same as some groups holding power over others, which is a pillar of conflict theory.  It starts with economic power, people are needed as labor, always have been.

    Struggle against the oppressor is a common theme in Marvin X’s life and writings.  Marvin X tells the story of how he was ordered removed from the campus of California State University, Fresno, 1969.  He was invited and hired to lecture in the Black Studies Department the Black Student Union. His four classes with seventy students was approved by the administration of Fresno State until Governor Ronald Reagan demanded his contract  voided by the Board of  Trustees of California State Colleges. Governor Regan considered Marvin X too radical when it was discovered he had refused to fight in Vietnam.  Student protests  started and the Fresno Superior issued a restraining order that forbid Marvin X from stepping on the campus. When FSU refused to pay his salary, the California Professors Union donated his salary. He continued his classes across the street from the college/now university, at the Christian Student Center and gave final grades to his seventy students. Student protests continued with the burning down  of the computer center by one of his star students who was sentenced to the California Youth Authority. Students from throughout California, calling themselves the United Black Students of California, mainly from Los Angeles colleges and universities supported his fight to teach at FSU and his draft trial in San Francisco Federal Court. This was one major conflict  that Marvin X experienced throughout his life. Power being exerted over people without power.

    Marvin X was violently attacked by his girlfriend 3 or 4 years ago.  This incident lead to Marvin X losing eyesight in his left eye.  He explained that this was a continuation of domestic violence.  Marvin X was upset that the District Attorney decided not to press charges due to his own prior acts. This was just another example of Law Enforcement not being fair to him in the criminal justice system.

    The 1948 Arab – Israeli war between Israel and five of its Arab neighbors stands out as a significant event for Marvin X.  At the age of 4 years old, Marvin still vividly remembers watching refugees streaming across the borders fleeing the Israelis.  This conflict served as an instrumental influence on Marvin X’s worldview that he maintains to this day.  He believes strongly that the Israelis are white devil and the source of the conflict.  They are suppressing and oppressing the Palestinian people, in Marvin X’s view.  This is compounded by the United States being the primary backer of the Israeli government.  Nothing short of complete cut off of American aid and support would satisfy Marvin X with his all or nothing attitude.

    This leads to one of the flaws of conflict theory as it relates to Marvin X. Minority groups in conflict theory are defined in economic terms. Less weight is given for color of one’s skin. Conflict theory also doesn’t do much with issues related to identity and sexual orientation. Minority groups whether race/ethnicity, gender or sexual orientation are almost always economically defined. Conflict theory doesn't often explain very well why people work together and cooperate. Most people go to work not just because their bosses force them to, but because there's a mutually beneficial relationship between workers and their employers - or even (for the lucky few) because they obtain some intrinsic enjoyment from the work they do.

    Critical Race Theory

    There are six fundamental propositions in Critical Race Theory as laid out by the influential Derrick Bell.  Many call Derrick Bell the founder of Critical Race Theory. This theory believes that the Civil Rights Movement did not go far enough because racism is embedded in the fiber of American life. According to the New York Times obituary Derrick Bell saw Critical Race Theory as “a body of legal scholarship that explored how racism is embedded in laws and legal institutions, even many of those intended to redress past injustices” (Bernstein, 2011)  The six fundamental propositions are: (1) There is endemic racism; (2) Race is a social construction; (3) Differential racialization; (4) Interest convergence/materialist determinism; (5) Voices of Color; (6) Antiessentialism/intersectionality.

    Critical Race Theory is closest to Marvin X’s lifetime experiences. He lives in a world that is defined by race with the struggle ongoing. Racism is the norm in society according to the theory.
    This paper will explore a few of them. First number one, followed by two and four. Intersectionality will crossover into an additional theory explanation.

    Strengths in propositions one, two and four.

    Proposition 1 states there is endemic racism.  Racism is embedded in the fabric of our society, it is the normal.  There is nothing unusual about racism. The current system of whites over people of color provides the framework for important societal functions. Whites will do whatever it takes to maintain the status quo. Marvin X speaks openly about being addicted to crack, which be says was brought into black neighborhoods by the CIA in 1984. Crack became his total desire, “Fuck teaching, fuck religion” (X, personal communication, November 17, 2018).  The crack epidemic hit the black community hard, by design, according to Marvin X. The courts were full, new prisons were built and law enforcement prospers financially to this day.

    Proposition 2 is Racial construction. According to this proposition, race is not biologically based; it is invented and manufactured. The American system has taken racism to an industrial level being the root of conflict. Marvin X has a fable where a black bird sits in his cage with the door open. The white master does not worry about the black bird flying away. Other birds of all types would fly in and encourage the black bird to fly away to freedom. The black bird was happy in his cage. One day there was a fire and the house was burning down. The white master fled and left the black bird. The black bird just sat in his cage waiting for his white master to return. As the fire spread the black bird refused to fly away. Just then another bird flew through the fire and yelled at the black bird to fly away. The black bird said he loved his cage. The other bird said you want to die, come with me my brother. The black bird flew away and yelled bye master as he flew past his master (X, 1972). This is an example of the black man being conditioned to stay enslaved by white power.

    Proposition 4 is Interest convergence/materialist determinism. This proposition expresses that working-class whites benefit from racism psychically (feel good about themselves because at least they aren’t black), and elite whites are advantaged materially (economic exploitation of an underclass), so a large segment of society (all whites) benefit from the current racial order.
    While in class at Academy of  da corner, we observed a middle-aged white male approach the table. He had his teenage daughter by his side. She was dressed in soccer attire and he was wearing athletic gear. Marvin X encouraged the man to check out a variety of books. The girl was hovering around a copy of Mythology of Pussy. At least he’s trying,  was the attitude Marvin X exhibited, (X, personal communication, November 17, 2018). Marvin X then offered a small collection of books for $20.00 and the man handed over his credit card.  He pulled the card out of his pocket as he did not have his wallet which supported his statement that he had no cash on him.  Marvin X has a smart phone application that allows him to take donations from plastic.  The application was not working but Marvin X kept trying. The man stated that he needed to pick up something from the pharmacy a few steps away.  He left his card and headed to the pharmacy.  After a few minutes he returned for his card and his books. There was a look of disappoint on both the man and the teenager's face.  This is an example of the white bourgeoisie attempting to feel superior to the man of color. Like, "Nigger, why can't you get your shit together?"

    A glaring weakness in Critical Race Theory is that it says that blacks, African Americans, will never fare well in America. By declaring that the Civil Rights Movement does not go far enough leaves little room for compromise on big issues dealing with race. And while slavery is over, a racist society continues to exert dominion over black men and their maleness in ways more subtle but hardly less castrating than during slavery.

    Intersectionality

    While Intersectionality is the sixth fundamental proposition of Critical Race Theory, it is also its own stand-alone theory.  Critical Race Theory accepts the intersectionality of oppressions of all types. This suggests that a primary focus will distort the effects of other forms of exclusion.  Intersectionality is a crucial tenet in Critical Race Theory because it shows the different types of oppression which are faced by people of color.   There are many different types of discrimination, including things like discrimination based on sex, gender, culture, race and other factors. We can often consider these things in isolation. But what happens when someone experiences multiple forms of discrimination at the same time? What happens when we have overlapping areas of discrimination? One of the things that can happen is that we can have individuals in our society that have characteristics that can result in them facing discrimination in multiple different areas. For example, we can view one of Marvin X’s daughters, Amira, a female who is of African American origin, and who attended Yale undergrad (Giambrone, 2012) and Stanford Law. She attended school in a particular part of our country that may cause her to be discriminated against in three different areas. So, if we were to draw her circles of discrimination, what would her overlap look like? She may have one overlap based on her sexual gender. She may have one overlap based on her racial or cultural identification, and she may have another circle based on her education. Right in the center, we have this level of extreme overlap. Now, why is it important to consider this intersection of these three different areas? It's important because at this intersection is multiple different categories of potential discrimination or oppression that may compound an interplay in this one individual, and really significantly put her at a disadvantage within society. In order to understand the level of disadvantage that she has, we really need to understand all three of these factors. The theory of intersectionality really states just that. It focuses on the point in which these multiple different areas of potential discrimination overlap with one another, and exist alongside one another.

    We really need to understand when all of these things coexist, because if we don't consider all of them at the same time, we really don't get to fully understand the situation. So, in this individual, if we just consider the fact that she likes Buddhist teachings, in a culture or society that really doesn't appreciate that, and we miss the fact that the society also doesn't appreciate the fact that she's female, or discriminates against African Americans, we may not fully understand the level of discrimination that she faces. And the same situation would result if we only considered the fact that she was female in a sexist society, or that she was African American in a racist society. So, this theory of intersectionality really asks us to consider all of the different levels of discrimination. While the theory was originally coined in 1989 by Crenshaw as a feminist theory to explain the oppression of women, it has since really expanded. People use it to explain oppression and discrimination in all of society.

    A flaw with Intersectionality is the declining significance of race in dealing with economic advancement. There are new opportunities for Blacks as barriers to employment are reduced. Some remain and we must stay vigilant in the fight against discrimination of all types. William Julius Wilson pointed this out in his book, The Truly Disadvantaged (Wilson, 2012). Barriers are falling and people are more aware of discrimination.

    Social Learning Theory

    The thought to include Social Learning Theory came from a fellow student and allows the paper to track Marvin X’s education directly. Social Learning Theory is a theory of social behavior and learning that believes new behaviors can be acquired by observing and learning from others. It offers a better explanation of learning than behaviorism. Experience is a great teacher, but we learn by seeing the world.  We learn from watching others successes and failures. Social Learning Theory goes further and lays out human development. This theory explains how the cycle of family violence repeats itself. The child who sees his father beat his mother has a high percentage without intervention to beat his wife (Social Learning Theory | Sociology | Chegg Tutors, 2016). This theory draws heavily from the work of Albert Bandura’s in the 1960s.  Whit whom do we learn from and in what environment is a question that has plagued American education. Derrick Bell once wrote, “In light of the often-violent struggle that resulted from the Supreme Court’s 1954 desegregation decision, Brown v. Board of Education, things might have worked out better if the court had instead ordered that both races be provided with truly equivalent schools” (Bernstein, 2011).

    When Marvin X was in high school, he had a white female English teacher.  At some point Marvin X let her know that his goal in life was to be a writer. She offered the advice that in order to be a great writer, you have to read.  Now she did not tell him what to read, just to read and read some more.  Reading the classics including Shakespeare became Marvin X’s obsession. This led to a greater appreciation of written works.   He was turned onto James Baldwin’s writing by a fellow student, a Hispanic brother He introduced Marvin X to Giovanni’s Room (Baldwin, 2001). While the subject matter was not of interest, the style inspired Marvin X to read other Baldwin writings, especially Notes of A Native Son,The Five Next Time, Go Tell it on the Mountain and The Amen Corner. In 1968 he interviewed Baldwin at his New York apartment.

    Attending segregated schools had a lifelong impact on Marvin X. With a gift for writing and  public speaking, it was evident from an early age that Marvin X was going to do big things. It was said according to Marvin X, that he spoke just like his father, a businessman, social activist, both parents were members of the NAACP.  According to Oakland Post Newspaper Publisher, Paul Cobb, Marvin's father attending Garveyite meetings at Paul's grandfather's house in West Oakland.

    The influence of having all blacks, including teachers and administration of the schools, was very influential on Marvin X.  His parents were very conscious from his early childhood that finding a good school for their children  was important. He attended different schools in the first three grades, including McFeely and Prescott in West Oakland, Lincoln and Columbia in Fresno. He ended up at for a short time at St. Patrick’s, a black catholic elementary school in West Oakland.

    Because of Red Lining, the school boundaries only included black communities. All black teachers who received respect within the black community had a positive impact on Marvin X’s life. Marvin X’s entire life was segregated, “Nigguhs just did not go across town, no signs, just the way it was.” (X, personal communication, November 17, 2018). Learning in an all black scenario forged a desire for self-reliance and mistrust of anyone white. This can be compared to the experience of current and recent immigrants to the United States.  As stated by Williams, “The results are consistent with findings suggesting that discrimination is negatively associated with adult well-being” (Williams, 2014).  The hatred of white people was developed and nurtured in this environment.

    A  weaknesses is that the theory downplays the biological aspects of human behavior.  Furthermore, the theory does not explain why many people observe behavior but do not engage in the behavior (e.g. everyone who grows up in a violent home do not continue the cycle). A further weakness of Social Learning Theory is when it comes to the child’s accountability for his own actions. Putting the focus on how setting influences behavior places more weight on the people and the community that the child is part of, and not enough weight on how the child handles and processes new information. It neglects the child’s accountability and may not go too far in stating that society directs how the individual behaves and acts.

    Personal Reflection

    This interview helped me to understand the anger and perpetual conflict that rages within Marvin X.  Having grown up with many advances in society and desegregation, it takes effort to relate to the life experiences of Marvin X.  Segregated schools and shopping always appeared to be things from old black and white videos. Marvin X’s life is very unique and intriguing.  A couple of hours did not do him justice so a second interview was scheduled. We focused again on his adolescence and early adulthood periods.  This plays into something a friend of his says, “Communicating and reading Marvin X must be treated like a buffet, i.e.,you have to pace yourself with a little bit of Marvin X at a time.” He can be overwhelming. His students speak of "The Wild Crazy Ride of the Marvin X Experience!"

    His life is full of conflict and turmoil. An example is from a recent poem posted on his blog www.blackbirdpressnews.blogspot.com

    “We want reparations for every ounce of white blood in North American Americans
    rape blood not love blood
    vicious rapist white man blood, 1619 blood,
    good ship Jesus
    Pilgrim
    John Hawkins Amazing Grace blood....”

    This sums up Marvin X’s beginning point of healing in making right for the past in both social issues and economic as well.  Not much room for compromise when it comes to repaying blacks for the sins of the white power structure.

    My expectations were of someone with fire and brimstone coming out of his mouth. It appeared Marvin X has mellowed out with age or I just caught him on mellow days. With a beard, belly, and warm face, he orchestrates his life. He was that friendly man down the street who was smiling and happy most of the time. He had a magnetism that attracted people of all races, nationalities and genders. While his body of work is full of fervor, in person Marvin X was old school with some high levels of machismo bordering on #metoo violations. Many women still reacted in a positive manner when Marvin X whistled and cat called them. He even told the story of one of his students who connected with a woman was checking out books  at his

    When Marvin X was asked if he had a chance to live life over again, would you it the same? His reply was that life is a privilege. “How many niggas have time to write a book. I have lived a privileged life. Blessed not to have to work” (X, personal communication, November 17, 2018). He seemed very content with his legacy. He seems at peace with all around him and encourages those around him to practice peace and love, not hate.

    Conclusion

    Many things can be learned in a variety of environments. Marvin X’s Academy on da Corner is a prime example of alternative learning.  There should be a way of accrediting such important street philosophers.  The diversity of the different groups represented offer a real free speech zone, as Marvin X likes to call his Academy of da Corner.

    This interview demonstrated the importance of the social worker to apply multiple theories to their clients.  There is no cookie cutter method of dealing with all clients, treating them as individuals is crucial. Applying the various applicable theories is a great place to start.



    References

    Baldwin, J. (2001). Giovanni's Room. NY: Penguin.
    Bernstein, F. (2011, October 6). Derrick Bell, Law Professor and Rights Advocate, Dies at 80. The New York Times.
    Giambrone, A. (2012, Sep 6). Yale sees increase in freshman class diversity. Yale Daily News. Retrieved from https://yaledailynews.com/blog/2012/09/06/yale-sees-increase-in-freshman-class-diversity/
    M, D. (2008). How to Recover from the Addiction to White Supremacy (A Pan African 12-Step Model for a Mental Health Peer Group). Oakland: Black Bird Press.
    Social Learning Theory | Sociology | Chegg Tutors (2016). [Motion Picture]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ftm3Ohm65zs
    Williams, J. (2014). Pathways to Pain: Racial Discrimination and Relationships. Journal of Black Psychology.
    Wilson, W. (2012). The Truly Disadvantaged. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.
    X, M. (1972). Black Bird. Oakland: Black Bird Press.




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    SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2018

    Brothers rapping at Academy of da Corner, Lakeshore Ave., Oakland 11/24/18


    This Saturday was sunny, clear sky after rain that cleansed the air of smoke from Camp Fire. Paradise destroyed. Pray for Paradise. No masks necessary today. Brothers gathered for the Saturday session at Academy of da Corner, Lakeshore Ave., Oakland.

    Music by Jimmy Smith fired up the community, people danced. Randy said he just sat in his car listening to the Smith blasting the Hammond B3 organ. One young lady did a pole dance. When Master Teacher Marvin X changed the music to Oldies But Goodies, Randy demanded he switch the music back to Jimmy Smith. Then Davey D arrived, Academy of da Corner manhood trainee. D wanted to know if there had been any crooning going on. Marvin told him he just missed us crooning to Oldies but Goodies, i.e., Al Young, Marvin Gaye, Stevie Wonder, et al. D was asked to identity the Hammond B3 music. He went into a long lecture on how he's had to get familiar with all genres of ethnic music, including regional Mexican music for his DJ gigs. Randy said, "Are you through now?" D never answered the question if he knew Jimmy Smith was on the organ. 

    Gene Hazzard engaged Randy in a long conversation on Oakland politics. Gene is Oakland's inimitable whistle blower on City politicians who violate ethic laws, exposing such perennial corrupt businessmen as Paul Tagami who has secured numerable City properties and projects for little or nothing, such as Frank Ogawa Plaza, Fox Theatre and the Oakland Army Base. 

    Gene told Randy and us that Mayoral candidate Cat Brooks should go for the city council next time. The mayor has no power under the city charter. Marvin X concurred with Gene. He informed Cat after she lost the election to incumbent Libby Schaaf, she might get on the city council. He told her, "Ras Baraka tried three times before he won as Mayor of Newark, recently reelected in a landslide." 
    --Marvin X
    Academy of da Corner Lakeshore
    Oakland CA
    11/24/18
    Marvin X on Tour


    Marvin X reading at University of Chicago Sun Ra Conference, 2015
    photo Burrell Sunrise

    December 4
    San Francisco State University, Davey D's Hip Hop Class, 4pm
    December 5
    Reading at the Beat Museum, with other anti-capitalist poets from anthology by same name, Columbus and Broadway, North Beach, San Francisco
    December 15
    Reading from Notes of Artistic Freedom Fighter Marvin X, Charles Wright Museum, Detroit, Michigan
    Saturday, 2-4pm.

    January 2019
    Brothers Network brings Marvin X to Philly for reading and book signing. Musical genius Elliott Bey will
    provide sounds to accompany his beloved Master Teacher.
    TBA
    February 2019
    BAMFEST Oakland, Dr. Ayodele Nzinga Producer
    Marvin X, BAM Co-founder
    Senior Consultant

    In Concert: Marvin X reading from his dramatic works
    TBA
    Salaam, Huey Newton, Salaam
    Woman on Cell Phone
    Fictional interview with President Obama
    Driving Miss Libby
    Parable of a Real Woman
    Parable of the Heart
    Parable of Black Man and Block Man
    Parable of the Parrot
    Parable of the Rat
    Parable of Joy and Happiness
    Note: Marvin X will exhibit his archives as a founding member of the National Black Arts Movement, the most
    radical literary and artistic movement in American history.

    Late 2019
    Austin, Texas
    Marvin X reading, accompanied by the Sun Ra Arkestra on the 400th Anniversary of Africans arriving in the Americas as captured Africans in the American Slave System (Ed Howard term, Oakland).

    Now booking for lecture/dramatic readings

    Contact Marvin X:
    send letter of invitation to:
    jmarvinx@yahoo.com
    www.blackbirdpressnews.blogspot.com




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    Breaking News

    The BSU Founders of the 1968 student strike at San Francisco State University have asked Marvin X to consider returning to writing The Untold Story of the Black Students and Third World Strike at SFSU. The BSU Strike founders released Marvin a few months ago but on Thanksgiving he got a call from their spokesperson, Bernard Stringer, asking him to resume writing their critical history of the American student revolution. San Francisco State University student strike was the longest in American academic history. It led to the first Black Studies and Ethnic Studies Department on the campus of a major university and college in America. Dr. Nathan Hare was the first chair and coined the terms black and ethnic studies. His retention was a source of contention in the strike.

    The consensus is Marvin X is the Chosen One for this project because he was a member of the SFSU Negro Students Association that morphed into the Black Students Union. Marvin X is considered one of the visionary students that laid the ground for the BSU and Black and Ethnic Studies. Marvin has a degree of objectivity since he was underground in Harlem, NY, 1968, participating in the birth of the Black Arts Movement. In 1969, he was fighting to teach at Fresno State University but banned from stepping onto the campus on orders of Gov. Ronald Reagan, who also had Angela Davis removed from UCLA the same time. Gov. Reagan apparently feared Angela's Black Communism and Marvin's Black Islam!

    BSU Strike Founders are confronted with a most difficult problem in assigning Marvin X to write their history: No one has been able to control his pen. Often, he is unable to control his pen. Attorney John Burris, whose career began with the Melvin Black Human Rights Conference, 1979, produced by Marvin X at the Oakland Auditorium, says, "Marvin X says some wild things in his books!"

    He informed BSU Strike leaders he will not have anyone looking over his shoulder as he writes. The Founders are locked in the central committee paradigm so if a memorandum of understanding can be agreed upon by all parties, we may be able to produce the product: a people's narrative of black revolutionary student struggle on white colleges and universities in America.

    Marvin's vision is perhaps larger than the BSU Founders who are primarily concerned with a truthful narrative of their strike. Marvin's desire is to incorporate the student struggle with the Black Arts Movement and the Black Power or National Liberation Movement, with the focus on Black students struggle nationally and internationally. Although underground, Marvin X attended the student strike at Sir George Williams University, Montreal, Canada, 1968. He arrived in Mexico City a few months after the student massacre. Repression was so brutal that when the parents arrived at the University to check on their children, the parents disappeared.

    While exiled in Mexico City, Marvin was among many young revolutionaries from throughout the Americas who were given refuge by Mexico. I appreciate Mexico for giving refuge to all of us young men and women (my wife B. Hall, aka Hasani, enjoyed exile with me), although mostly young men from Dominican Republic, Cuba, Columbia, Venezuela, Belize, Honduras, Guatemala.

    El Muhajir means migrant, refugee, pilgrim traveler. There is no way I cannot appreciate the desperation of those refugees at the borders of America seeking entry. Why doesn't the American "fake media" show us the conditions from which the migrants flee? Show us the dirt floor huts, some with electricity, most without. Show us the people in villages washing dishes, bathing, urinating and drinking from steams and rivers. Show us the people who are forced into drug cartel gangs to survive, especially their families, especially police and military men.

    And do not overstay your visa in Mexico. Don't get stopped by the policia, mucho problemas. Yo creo no! In contrast, most of the illegals in the USA are visa violators, not those who slipped across the border. Of course the supreme irony and contradiction is both Democrats and Republicans benefit from migrant neo slave labor.

    In Mexico City my contact was revolutionary artist Elizabeth Catlett Mora, a Black Communist from Washington, DC., who married Mexican muralist Poncho Mora. Communist Betty Mora had a maid, and after I shared an apartment with sister Beverley, associate from the Lafayette Theatre, partner of a Venezuelan revolutionary artist, we also had a live-in maid for $30.00 per month US.




    Academy of da Corner Lakeshore Oakland Ca

    Today, Sunday, 11/25/18, a white man walked by Marvin X's Academy of da Corner, Lakeshore Ave., Oakland, and said proudly and loudly, "I'm a proud racist, yes, I'm a white nationalist!" Marvin X replied, "I ain't mad at you, I'm a proud black nationalist!" Whites standing near his book stand were aghast! An oriental woman came over to say to the poet, "Did I hear what I think I heard him say?" Marvin said, "Yes. And I appreciate his honesty! Tell me what you are rather than be phony." We should be grateful President Trump acknowledged he is a white nationalist. I want the white man to enjoy the last days of his whiteness then report to Gitmo for long term recovery and reeducation, though the Big Book of AA speaks of those who are constitutionally unable to recover from addictions, and I add white supremacy as the most cunning and vile addiction in the modern world.


    Marvin X Fan Club, Berkeley Flea Market
    photo Kamau Amen Ra (RIP)


    Marvin X at Academy of da Corner, 14th and Broadway, downtown Oakland
    photo Adam Turner

    True, white supremacists turned Africans and other colonized peoples into Europeans in black, brown and yellow faces. Dr. Hare calls us Black Anglo Saxons. Fanon wrote Black Skins, White Masks. In Mexico they say, "Coffee con leche!" In the Caribbean they say, "Black mon, white heart!" A few days ago on Lakeshore at the Academy, a young man said, "The black man is a white man dipped in chocolate!"

    So let the white man stay white and let me stay black. I'm not trying to be white. To paraphrase Sly Stone, I thank God for lettin' me be myself again! Yes, after 400 years! My family is at least four generations from being niggas in consciousness. I am so thankful.



    Reception in Harlem, New York for Marvin X at the home of Rashidah Ismaili. Marvin X was in New York to participate in memorial services for Amiri Baraka and Jayne Cortez at New York University, 2014

    Believe it or not, I am not against interracial marriage or dating. I think every black person who desire a white person should fulfill their heart's desire, rather than be with a black person only to abuse them for not being of their desire for a white mate in black face. Don't destroy a black person because they are not white. Get with a real white man or woman so that you can be truly happy.


    Marvin often recalls what Martin Luther King, Jr., said in his Letter from a Birmingham Jail, "I'd rather be with the KKK than phony white liberals...." Did not a poll find that a high percentage of Millennials reveal they hold similar racist views except on sexual matters?  "We hate niggers but we love their good black pussy and dicks!" Bay Area poet Paradise Jah Love has a classic poem They Love Everything About You but You!"

    Marvin X told the oriental woman, "While teaching English at the University of Nevada, Reno, 1979, I was interviewed by a reporter from the Reno Gazette who informed me from the outset he was a Red Neck. I didn't give a damn, hell, I'm a Black Neck! But I felt sorry for my big, tall white student who didn't know the difference between to, too and two!"

    Marvin X on Tour
    Now booking coast to coast


    Marvin X reading at University of Chicago Sun Ra Conference, 2015
    photo Burrell Sunrise

    December 4
    San Francisco State University, Davey D's Hip Hop Class, 4pm
    December 5
    Reading at the Beat Museum, with other anti-capitalist poets from anthology by same name, Columbus and Broadway, North Beach, San Francisco
    December 15
    Reading from Notes of Artistic Freedom Fighter Marvin X, Charles Wright Museum, Detroit, Michigan
    Saturday, 2-4pm.

    January 2019
    Brothers Network brings Marvin X to Philly for reading and book signing. Musical genius Elliott Bey will
    provide sounds to accompany his beloved Master Teacher.
    TBA
    February 2019
    BAMFEST Oakland, Dr. Ayodele Nzinga Producer
    Marvin X, BAM Co-founder
    Senior Consultant

    In Concert: Marvin X reading from his dramatic works
    TBA
    Salaam, Huey Newton, Salaam
    Woman on Cell Phone
    Fictional interview with President Obama
    Driving Miss Libby
    Parable of a Real Woman
    Parable of the Heart
    Parable of Black Man and Block Man
    Parable of the Parrot
    Parable of the Rat
    Parable of Joy and Happiness
    Note: Marvin X will exhibit his archives as a founding member of the National Black Arts Movement, the most
    radical literary and artistic movement in American history.

    Late 2019
    Austin, Texas
    Marvin X reading, accompanied by the Sun Ra Arkestra on the 400th Anniversary of Africans arriving in the Americas as captured Africans in the American Slave System (Ed Howard term, Oakland).

    Now booking for lecture/dramatic readings coast to coast at colleges, conferences, festivals, workshops

    Contact Marvin X:
    send letter of invitation to:
    jmarvinx@yahoo.com
    www.blackbirdpressnews.blogspot.com


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    Remembering Garfield Belfon Fourteen Year –Old youth killed by Toronto Police in 1953

    Norman (Otis) Richmond aka Jalali





    “The police become necessary in human society only at that junction of human society when it is split between those who have and those who ain't got.” -- Omali Yeshitela, Chairman African People's Socialist Party



    Before Black Lives Matter Toronto there was the Black Action Defense Committee (BADC). Sherona Hall, Dudley Laws, Charles Roach, and Lennox Farrell founded BADC). These groups were created to deal with the question of police brutally in the Canadian context. 


    Little or nothing has recently been written or discussed about the shooting of a 14 year- old Black youth in Toronto in the 1950s. The front page of the Nov. 30, 1953 edition of the Toronto Daily Star could have been written in 2018. The headline reads “Charge P.C. As Boy, 14 Shot Died.” This event took place in the basement of the S.S. White Co. dental building at 250 College Street. The officer had never fired his gun on duty before, told detectives that his gun went off when a pile of packing boxes toppled toward him. The bullet hit Belfon in the neck, killing him almost instantly. Press reports repeatedly said that the police officers' gun went off accidentally. It is noteworthy that the Star reported, “Belfon was the second person killed in four months by police gunfire. George Hurst was shot jumping over a fence in an attempted burglary in the east end. Constable Earl Snyder charged with manslaughter was freed at the preliminary hearing.”

    Three other youths were found in the building at the same time as Belfon. Frank Fuzz, George Marshall and Douglas Richardson all were 16 and were charged with shop breaking. Many will know Douglas as Dougie Richardson who went on to become one of Canada’s foremost jazz artists.


    Dougie Richardson

    The Toronto Star’s Ashante Infantry wrote in Richardson’s 2007 obituary: “A veteran who'd worked with stellar acts such as Freddie Hubbard and the O'Jays, Richardson was best known as co-leader of the award-winning hard bop group Kollage with boyhood pal drummer Archie Alleyne.” It should be remembered that Richardson also worked with the legendary Chicago comedian/actor Bernie Mac.


    Dougie’s father Sam Richardson was a legendary Track and Field athlete. At 15, in London’s Commonwealth Games in 1934, he won his gold medal in the long jump with a leap of 23 feet 8 inches (7.21 metres), and silver in the triple jump. I wrote an article about Richardson for the Globe and Mail in 1983. The late Gwen Johnston reflected on this historical event. I wrote: “Gwen Johnston, a co-proprietor of Third World Books and Crafts and Richardson's first cousin, remembers how Toronto's small but enthusiastic black community reacted to Richardson's victory when he returned. Says Johnston: "You couldn't get to him, the crowd was so great at Union Station. The community welcomed their young son home. We had a big reception for him at a place called Belvin Hall, which was on College near Spadina. I'll never forget it."

    A historical event took place on February 15th. A Street in downtown Toronto was named Sam Richardson Way. That day also happened to be Richardson’s oldest son Norman Richardson’s 80th birthday.

    he killing of Belfon was headline news in the corporate press in Toronto. Nineteen Fifty-Three was a deplorable year for African people in Canada and the people of the world - period. The year of Belfon’s death was also the same year that the immortal James Baldwin’s award winning semi-autobiographical novel Go Tell It on the Mountain was published.

    The Cold War was pretty hot. Dwight D. Eisenhower becomes President of the Empire. Joseph Stalin of the Soviet Union dies. The Land and Freedom Army so-called Mau Mau were on the move in Kenya. General elections were held in “British Guyana” April 27, 1953. They were the first held under universal suffrage and resulted in a victory for the People’s Progressive Party (PPP), which won 18 of the 24 seats in the new House of Assembly. Its leader, Cheddi Jagan, became Prime Minister.

    In the US Julius and Ethel Rosenberg are executed. They were accused of conspiring to commit espionage and passing nuclear weapons secrets to Russian agents. In the United States the first color television sets go on sale, for around $1,175. The New York Yankees defeated the Brooklyn Dodgers who had Jackie Robinson and Roy Campanella on their roster. The Yankees were white, on white, in white.

                Bromely Armstrong


    Bromely Armstrong came to Canada from Jamaica in 1947. Armstrong remembers the merits and demerits of living in Canada. There were issues with the police when he came here. He talks about this in Bromley Memoirs of Bromley L. Armstrong by Sheldon Taylor. Says Armstrong: “Before the Buddy Evans shooting, some police officers allegedly would abuse and brutalize minorities and First Nation’ peoples. However, in such instances care seemed to have taken by those police officers to ensure that their somewhat racially motivated actions were not fatal. This was not the case with the 1950s Belfonshooting. 

    James Belfon was a barber with a business located near Huron and Dundas streets in Toronto. His son Garfield was shot as it is alleged, when he and a number of other youths were caught in the act of breaking and entering a dental warehouse in Toronto.

    A Toronto Chapter of Black Lives Matter was organized in 2013. BADC was founded in 1988 in response to the killing of Lester Donaldson a Jamaican born Canadian, which was the last straw in a series of police shootings of Black men in Toronto. B. Denham Jolly came to Toronto for the first time in 1956. Jolly reflected on how the shooting of Buddy Evans, a 24 year old Nova Scotia born man affected Toronto’s Black community.

    Evans was shot dead by a police officer in 1978 during a fight at a Toronto disco. This event led to an 11-week inquest and mobilized African Canadians. The government responded by creating a civilian complaints commission pilot project in the 1980s. Jolly tells the story in his award winning memoir, In The Black: My Life.

    The African People's Socialist Party has declared February 21th as the Day of the African Martyr. El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz (Malcolm X) was killed inside the Audubon Ballroom in New York City on February 21, 1965. “The African People’s Socialist Party calls on all African revolutionaries of all countries to raise high, in a revolutionary manner, the heroic memory of all our fallen martyrs, of all those in every city, village, community and country where they fell as evidence of the determination of our people to fight every battle on every front until liberty has been won.”

    During this time we should also remember Toronto’s Garfield Belfon and Sandra Bland. Bland was a 28-year-old black woman who was found hanged in a jail cell in Waller County, Texas, on July 13, 2015, three days after being arrested during a traffic stop. 

    Many maintain that African people are oppressed wherever we are. Some go so as far saying that black people are the footstools of humanity.

    The great Vietnamese leader, Ho Chi Minh wrote this in 1924: “It is well-known that the Black race is the most oppressed and the most exploited of the human family. It is well-known that the spread of capitalism and the discovery of the New World had as an immediate result the rebirth of slavery. What everyone does not perhaps know is that after sixty-five years of so-called emancipation, American Negroes still endure atrocious moral and material sufferings, of which the most cruel and horrible is the custom of lynching.”

    Norman (Otis) Richmond aka Jalali is a Toronto Arts Award winner. Richmond is the producer of the weekly radio show Diasporic Music on https://blackpower96.org/ His column Diasporic Music appears monthly in the Burning Spear newspaper. Richmond recently received the Jackie Robinson Fortitude Award from 1st Friday’s.

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    I Wish I was a weak nigga

    Marvin X reading at the University of Chicago Sun Ra Conference on Afro-futurism, 2015
    photo Burrell Sunrise



    I wish I was a weak nigga and I don't even know why. But I'm standing on the shoulders of so many strong niggas, I can't be a weak nigga if I wanted. I'm standing on the shoulders of so many warrior men and women, including Mama and Daddy, I can't be a weak nigga!



    I'm standing on the shoulders of prison niggas who told me on the big yard, "Marvin X, you the smartest, you the minister." He told the other brother he was the secretary and he, himself, was the captain. Election over, meeting Sunday in the prison chapel. And we met!

    I'm standing on the shoulders of strong niggas. Captain Edward X of Los Angeles FOI, drilled us chanting, "We FOI, we ain't no punks, no sissies, no squares, we FOI, soldiers in the name of Allah! March, march time march. left right left. about face, left right left, about face, march time march!"

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    Marvin X spoke at his alma mater 
    San Francisco State University
    12/4/18

    Poet/activist Marvin X with San Francisco State University Students after his lecture/discussion in Davey D's class on Hip Hop
    photo Davey D

    This afternoon (12/4/18) Marvin X spoke for two hours in Davey D's class on Hip Hop, informing students on the connection between the Black Arts Movement and Hip Hop.
    Before he began, Davey D showed the video of Marvin X reading at Yoshi's San Francisco, introduced by Amiri Baraka before Baraka and Roscoe Mitchell of the Chicago Art Ensemble performed. Marvin read his poem In the Name of Love. 

    Although Marvin X participated in the Black Arts Movement coast to coast, West coast folks want to claim him, although he was critical in the formation of BAM coast to coast. His writing career began at Oakland's Merritt College when he won a prize in Merritt's literary magazine. His short story Delicate Child was reprinted in the Revolutionary Action Movement's journal SoulBook, edited by Kenny Freeman, aka Mamadou Lumumba. SoulBook was a critical journal of the revolutionary black nationalist movement. 

    Davey D asked him to explain differences between Black Arts Movement West and East. The poet said firstly, as per the West coast, we must begin at Merritt College on Grove Street, aka MLK,Jr., Drive and the Afro American Association under the leadership of Khalid Abdullah Al Mansour, aka Attorney Donald Warden. We cannot discuss culture and consciousness without explaining the importance of the AAA. It was critical to African and Black consciousness in the Bay. The Black Panther Party evolved from the AAA, the Black Arts Movement and Black Studies. Kwanza no doubt originated with the AAA, especially since Maulana Ron Karenga was the Los Angeles representative of the AAA. 

    The AAA held rap sessions on the steps of Merritt or Oakland City College, along with book sessions in the community and on street corners. Merritt students, whether associated with the AAA or not, were influenced by it and also had independent study sessions on such topics as the deconstruction of such books as Black Bourgeoisie by E. Franklin Frazier,Wretched of the Earth by Dr. Frantz Fanon, Facing Mt. Kenya by Jomo Kenyatta and Neo-colonialism: the Last Stage of Imperialism by Kwame Nkrumah. We also studied the writngs of Fidel Castro, Che Guevara, Ho Chi Minh and Mao Zedong.

    ---continued--




    Marvin X on Tour
    Now booking coast to coast


    Marvin X reading at University of Chicago Sun Ra Conference, 2015
    photo Burrell Sunrise

    December 4
    San Francisco State University, Davey D's Hip Hop Class, 4pm

    December 5
    Reading at the Beat Museum with other anti-capitalist poets from anthology Overthrowing Capitalism Vol.5, Columbus and Broadway, North Beach, San Francisco




    Marvin X opened the event with his contribution to the anthology: Sunrise Over Damascus
    photo Deon Whitmore

    Sunrise Over Damascus


    Sunrise Over Damascus
    Saul fell on damascus road
    became paul
    persecutor to liberator
    paul's christology mythologized slavery
    servants be obedient to your masters
    official sermon of black slave preachers
    mlk's mentor howard thurman mama told him
    boy read me the bible
    stop when you get to paul
    don 't wanna hear bout obedient servants
    yes mama
    howard thurman said
    mlk plagiarized his mentor in I have a dream
    sunrise over damascus
    primordial city rich history
    down road to Jerusalem
    house of peace with no peace
    land of Canaan
    brother of Egyptians
    then came Abraham
    Sarah Hajar
    Jews Arabs
    Isaac Ishmael 
    ancient times no peace
    no peace now
    land of prophets
    Jeremiah Isaiah 
    told us wickedness
    where are the prophets of now
    so needed at the gates of Jerusalem Damascus
    Lebanon Egypt Iraq Persia
    armies near Jerusalem to destroy what
    what is not destroyed already
    the people are dead souls in the dead sea
    cedars of lebanon burn sweet incense of death
    frankincense myrrh burn in the holy temple for naught
    biblical prophesy
    end is near
    who is there to see sunrise over damascus
    isis
    israel
    saudi arabia
    russia
    lebanon
    turkey
    usa usa 
    iran
    gulf states
    egypt 
    turkey
    kurds
    where is saladin the kurd
    who is richard lionhearted
    who is not 
    neo-crusade
    persia rises again
    from Tigris Euphrates to Mediterranean
    can we stop history
    fulfill whose mythology
    jewish christian islam
    myth is myth
    my story his/her story
    sunrise over damascus
    a million dead
    how many poison gas dead
    dead is dead
    no matter how
    blood bones is blood bones
    a million dead
    bullets bombs poison gas no matter
    what mind game is this
    dead are dead
    no matter how
    no matter why
    we cry for syria
    we cry
    sunrise over damascus.
    --Marvin X
    4/13/18



    Marvin X holding the Beat classic poem Howl by Allen Ginsberg
    photo Deon Whitmore



    Beat sign


    December 15
    Reading from Notes of Artistic Freedom Fighter Marvin X, Charles Wright Museum, Detroit, Michigan
    Saturday, 2-4pm.



    January 2019
    Brothers Network brings Marvin X to Philly for reading and book signing. Musical genius Elliott Bey will
    provide sounds to accompany his beloved Master Teacher.
    TBA
    February 2019
    BAMFEST Oakland
    Dr. Ayodele Nzinga Producer
    Marvin X, BAM Co-founder
    Senior Consultant


    In Concert: Marvin X reading from his dramatic works
    TBA
    Salaam, Huey Newton, Salaam
    Woman on Cell Phone
    Fictional interview with President Obama
    Driving Miss Libby
    Parable of a Real Woman
    Parable of the Heart

    Note: Marvin X will exhibit his archives as a founding member of the National Black Arts Movement, the most
    radical literary and artistic movement in American history.

    Late 2019
    Austin, Texas
    Marvin X reading, accompanied by the Sun Ra Arkestra on the 400th Anniversary of Africans arriving in the Americas as captured Africans in the American Slave System (Ed Howard term, Oakland).
    TBA

    Now booking for lecture/dramatic readings coast to coast at colleges, conferences, festivals, workshops

    Contact Marvin X:
    send letter of invitation to:
    jmarvinx@yahoo.com
    www.blackbirdpressnews.blogspot.com

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    Poet/Essayist/Educator/Activist Marvin X after his lecture/discussion in Davey D's Hip Hop class at
    San Francisco State University, Marvin X's alma mater. He was a founding member of the Black Students Union.
    photo Davey D

    Notes of Artistic Freedom Fighter Marvin X 
    Now Available
    Order your copy from
    Black Bird Press
    requested donation
    $29.95
    call 510-575-7148
    credit cards accepted

    Marvin X
    Poet, playwright, essayist, educator, activist
    speaking/reading
    University of Chicago, 2015
    photo Burrell Sunrise

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    The Smart People


    Marvin X reading at the University of Chicago, 2015
    photo Burrell Sunrise

    The smart people
    smarter than God people
    God did not create Smart people
    Smart people created God
    gave birth to the God idea
    There was no God before smart people
    They are the mothers and fathers of God
    Smart people made God in their image power glory
    They define God
    He does not define Smart people
    Smart people marry trees dogs horses cows
    do anything their hearts desire
    murder lie steal rape plunder lands
    destroy souls of men women children
    The lands of smart people
    havens of every filthy unclean bird
    God cannot save smart people
    nor will smart people save God.
    --Marvin X
    12/19/18

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    Elliott Bey, Philadelphia musician and student of Marvin X, describes his teacher's Notes of Artistic Freedom Fighter Marvin X as a dose of, "Literary fentanyl, opioid and heroin combined! It will kill the pain of oppression and inspire the oppressed to seek liberation, personal and national. Marvin X takes no prisoners, leaves no crops standing in the manner of David. Marvin X is solid, he don't bend!" 

    Some time ago, Elliott Bey instructed people on how to read Marvin's work. "Read it like you go to a buffet, i.e., read a little then let his words digest in your brain. Then go back for more. If you read too much at one time it can be overwhelming and may lead to overdose."


    Elliot Bey, Philadelphia keyboard genius and associate of Marvin X, performed with Marvin, members of the Sun Ra Arkestra and Rufus Harley on a classic recording at Philly's Warm Daddies, Marvin X calls 37 Minutes of Jazz History. Bey performs with Marvin X coast to coast, e.g., Penn University Poetry Session produced by Maurice Henderson; the Germantown WMCA with Marvin, Sonia Sanchez and the Sun Ra Arkestra. On the West Coast, Bey accompanied Marvin's production of the Kings and Queens of Black Consciousness, also the San Francisco Theatre Festival at Yerba Buena Center.

    Poet/Essayist/Educator/Activist Marvin X after his lecture/discussion in Davey D's Hip Hop class at
    San Francisco State University, Marvin X's alma mater. He was a founding member of the Black Students Union.
    photo Davey D

    Notes of Artistic Freedom Fighter Marvin X 
    Now Available
    Order your copy from
    Black Bird Press
    requested donation
    $29.95
    call 510-575-7148
    credit cards accepted

    New Logo and Identity for PayPal by fuseproject

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    On Wednesday, December 26, 2018, 7:41:22 PM PST, Marvin X Jackmon wrote:



    Poet/essayist Marvin X in the door of the apartment where he spent five years in solitude in Cherokee CA, down the road from :Paradise Ca. that was totally destroyed in the Camp Fire.
    photo Adam Turner


    Marvin X reading on the bench where he often wrote in solitude for five years, 99 per cent of the time he was alone. nor did he have sex during his five years writing and healing from the death of his son and partner, Oakland High School English teacher Marsha Satterfield. Kwame Satterfield is the first cousin of Dr.;Cornel West and the stepson of Marvin X. When Cornel comes to the Bay, Marvin often sits with the West family.



    Dear friends, comrades and fellow artists:

    In the name of the Black Arts Movement, we need your support to purchase a 11 1/2 acre property in Cherokee CA. This property was owned by my Patron Abdul Leroy James RIP. It is now owned by his brother Hasan Larry M James. The main house burned down in the recent Camp Fire that destroyed the entire town of Paradise. This property is a few miles away in Cherokee CA. The one bedroom apartment and two guest rooms remain in tact. I lived in solitude on the estate and occupied the still standing apartment for five years during which I wrote the   following five books: 

    How to Recover from the Addiction to White Supremacy, a manual based on the 12 Step Mode of AA
    Beyond Religion, toward Spirituality, essays
    Land of My Daughters, poems
    In the Crazy House Called America, essays
    Wish I Could Tell You the Truth, essaysa

    After five years of solitude, I experienced neural placidity, i.e., the transformation of my brain cells. BAM Master Sun Ra once said, "Where can the black man/woman go for RR?" Let us reply to Master Sun Ra, co-founder of BAM and Afro-Futurism, in the affirmative. Sunny, we have a space. But we must moveb expeditiously for investors made offers to Larry James on the day of our inspection of the property. Only minutes after Hasan James signed a modification of selling price. We may be able to convince Mr. James to grant us a 90 day option on the property, although is exhausted and suffering grief and sorrow at the transition of his beloved brother, Abdul. 



    West Oakland product, Real Estate investor Abdul Leroy James

    Marvin X's Patron RIP, also patron of the Bay Area Black Arts and Liberation Movements.

    Aside from supporting Marvin X's literary projects, Abdul helped produce Marvin's community projects:

    Melvin Black Forum on Human Rights, Oakland Auditorium, 1979

    National Conference of Black Men, Oakland Auditorium, 1980

    One Day in the Life, a docudrama of Crack addiction and recovery, including Marvin's last encounter with his friend Black Panther Co-founder, Dr. Huey P. Newton, in a West Oakland Crack House, 1996-2002, the longest running black play in Northern California Black theatre history, a recovery community cult classic.

    Kings and Queens of Black Consciousness Concert, San Francisco State University, 2001.

    San Francisco Black Radical Book Fair, Tenderloin, San Francisco CA., 2004.



    I give all honor and respect to my Patron Abdul LeRoy James RIP and his brother Hasan Larry James. 

    As result of the fire, the property is up for sale for $275,000. We would like to purchase the property for an artist's retreat and recovery center. 




    Most often in his five years of solitude, Marvin wrote on this bench, usually in the nude as there was nothing nearby except deer, wild turkeys, hawk. Visitors came and wanted to kill all living things. Marvin told them to kill nothing, e.g., birds, bees, ants, flies, spiders, nothing. When the bee comes into my house, I tell him to leave, tell the fly the same, even gnates. 


    If you would like to make a generous donation to obtain this beautiful land as a community property, please let me know ASAP. Your donation can be tax deductible. Thanks.
    Sincerely,de
    Marvin X
    BAM Co-founder
    510-575-7148
    jmarvinx@yahoo.com




    Dr. Cornel West and Marvin X 
    in Philly to support Mumia Abu Jamal

    I applaud Cornel West for  his critique of Prez Obama. No one is above criticism. Cornel is right: we must respect him, secure him but check him!

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    The gate of Marvin X's writing retreat in Cherokee CA, that suffered fire destruction in the Camp Fire that totally destroyed the nearby town of Paradise CA.
    photo Adam Turner



    Most progressives understand monopoly capitalism and its highest stage imperialism now called globalism. Kwame Nkrumah hipped us to Imperialism: the final stage of capitalism. But let us also deconstruct the contradictions in monopoly socialism, a left wing ideology that ultimately leaves many oppressed peoples on the bottom of the economic and political ladder. In monopoly socialism there is opportunism, classism, racism, ageism and white and/or caste based on color domination parading often under the guise of multi-multiculturalism, but always with North American Black Africans on the lowest rung of the multi-cultural ladder. In many cases if not most, the mulattoes in power will decry and deny mulatto power, will even deny they are mulattoes even though they enjoy all the privileges of mulattoism, a classical syndrome in Pan Africa, from the Motherland, Caribbean and USA. Do you know the Brown Bag Test? Even at Oakland's Merritt College that gave birth to  Bay Area African consciousness through the African American Association under the leadership of Attorney Donald Warden, aka Khalid Abdullah Al Mansour: black panther party, black arts movement and black studies, and Kwanza, alas, Maulana Karenga was the Los Angeles representative of Oakland's Afro American Association.

    As per monopoly socialism, a monopoly socialist feigned shock when I identified him as a monopoly socialist today at my Academy of da Corner Lakeshore, Oakland. He'd never heard the term before.
    The term has wandered about in the deep structure of my mind for some time. Furthermore, I have experienced the trauma of monopoly socialism in the arts. As per monopoly socialist artists attempting to dominate the capitalist grant process for non-profit organizations, the competition is lethal. Even after over a half century of labor as a cultural worker in the black arts movement, even after a close reading of Mao's classic Talks on Art and Literature at Yenun Forum, one can be deceived by artistic opportunism and elitism. Ancestor Amiri Baraka warned artists not to submit to the toxin of elitism. The bourgeoisie will attempt to satisfy starving artists with kibbles and bits. And artists suffering the toxin of elitism and opportunism will succumb to the world of make believe and conspicuous consumption.

    In summary,  North American Africans must guard against being deceived by all forces in the universe, most especially, the evil within himself/herself, for what is the greatest Jihad or Holy War? Answer: To win one's own soul!

    One must individually and collectively maintain focus on the North American African Agenda, not the multi-cultural mirage, leading to nothingness and dread. Yes, we must cultivate our own vine and tree! Look at the heavenly gardens Rasta Man/Woman have created. Look at the fruit thereof, look at the children who honor ancestors, elders, parents, children and the yet unborn.

    We shall not be subjected to monopoly capitalists or socialists. We are revolutionary black African nationalists. Have no mistake about this. We are in the spirit of Marcus Garvey and the Honorable Elijah Muhammad. And we love Malcolm X. Have no mistake about this. We understand revolution is not a pretty thang. Revolution is violent, contrary to our beloved brother Malcolm X, even the socalled Negro revolution was/is violent!
    --Marvin X
    12/28/18


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    Three book trees felled
    By Herb Boyd
    Special to the AmNews
    Harlem NY

         With the calendar about to flip and a new year is dawning, it was time for some house cleaning, time to clear a veritable forest of book trees making the path to the computer all the more challenging.  During a recent trip to Detroit I dropped by the Charles Wright Museum of African American History to chat with my friend Charles Ferrell, who produces some of the most enlightening political and cultural programs in the nation.
         On tap that afternoon was the poet and activist Marvin X and he gifted me with his latest book Notes of an Artistic Freedom Fighter Marvin X (Black Bird Press, 2019). After his opening remarks in which he let the audience know that he was well aware of Detroit’s prominence in the Black liberation struggle, ticking off names such Elijah Muhammad, Malcolm X, the Bogges, General Baker, and Imari Obadele, he read one of his favorite pieces.  It was compelling but my preference from a long list of essays was his review of the Black Panther film that still had traction.
         “While the film is a political disaster by projecting African royalty with its tainted past and/or present, those enamored of African culture will enjoy a boost of cultural consciousness,” he observed. “We Africans are a beautiful people, a cultured people, a people of genius in science and technology.  If Black Panther replaces sagging pants with dashikis, surely, the film must be applauded.
         “If it forces women to throw off their wigs as the woman did in the film,” Marvin continued, “it must be applauded.  The music, the chants, the communal dancing, the most colorful costumes and traditional ritual face makeup, should help Africanize a starving population of North American Africans.  The technology seemed excessive although we need to see African people utilizing science, technology, artificial intelligence, time travel.”
         This kind of balance pertains in the book, though the bulk of his analysis leans perceptibly to keeping the Black Arts Movement alive, and that makes sense for someone who was/is a vital component of its maintenance.
         Later that evening in Detroit my lifelong comrade Ron Lockett took me to Trinosophes, a club near downtown where pianist Rod Williams was fronting an ensemble. Seated near me was Carole and Bill Harris, and like Marvin, I was given Bill’s latest book I Got to Keep Moving (Wayne State University Press, 2018). It’s a collection of 25 short stories that are necklaced in a fashion resembling Jean Toomer’s Cane, and they resonate with the same passionate urgency and cultural integrity. Reading the first story reminded me of Marvin X’s description of coming of age in Fresno, California. The people very much resemble the inhabitants of Harris’s mythical and at times mystical homelands in Alabama. 
         The folk element is redolent as Harris introduces a number of residents who are reluctant to recount the atrocities of their past or they have deliberately put them into the deepest recesses of memory. But Harris is not silent; he speaks for them with that same poetic voice that is often so commanding in his plays. “It was in our ways of doing, in front of them.” he says of the collective survival of the folks against the forces of denial and racism, “our walking, our wearing, our working that sprouted from the seeds of our need to air our common yearnings and have them recognized  and welcomingly accepted and understood as useful—whether any or all of those things were through strength or by being sullen, daring, surly, dragging; or through shared wisdom or charms; it gave us confidence in ourselves and became storied examples in our ability to have an inside self, and therefore a belief in our spirit to continue.”
         Some of the Blacks in this realistically drawn Alabama landscape are so tough that “even the mules are jealous.” Harris has evoked a time and experience that many migrants from the territory, many who ventured from the menace of the Klan and white oppression will remember and amen.
         Harris’s tales were still whispering to me when I returned to Harlem and there waiting for me was Dorothy Butler Gilliam’s Trailblazer—A Pioneering Journalist’s Fight to Make the Media Look More Like America, (Center Street, 2019).  Suddenly, much of what Harris imagined, Gilliam had lived, coming of age in the segregated South and later as a reporter covering some of the most eventful moments during the civil rights era.
         Oddly enough, it was Gilliam’s trip to Africa in the summer of 1961 that proved pivotal in her becoming a trailblazer at the Washington Post. “The trip had given me a chance to show the editors that I could write, and think broadly,” she recalled. “I had no experience writing under daily deadline pressure, and this was a real daily newspaper. The editors at the Post were taking a gamble on me.  I had to prove I was up to the challenge. I had no idea how difficult or fulfilling that would be, or that I would spend nearly my entire career there.”
         And what a productive and rewarding half century it was, though this should not diminish the years she spent writing for African American publications.  One of the most exciting and harrowing episodes occurred with her first real assignment at the Post to cover James Meredith breaking the color barrier at the University of Mississippi. Readers will be interested to know her feelings about the photographer Ernest Withers with whom she worked upon learning much later that he was a paid FBI informant.
         Gilliam, like Ida B. Wells, Evelyn Cunningham, Era Bell Thompson, and Ethel Payne, never shirked from duty or feared speaking truth to power.  Her memoir is a chronicle of the nation’s history from a reporter who was an eyewitness and whose stories are as riveting as her own adventurous life.
         Three of the book trees have fallen, but staring at me across the room, like a huge Redwood, a sequoia of information is Jeffrey Stewart’s enormous biography of Alain Locke.  That’s going to take a Paul Bunyan effort. 

    Now Available from Black Bird Press, Notes of Artistic Freedom Fighter Marvin X

    Poet/Essayist/Educator/Activist Marvin X after his lecture/discussion in Davey D's Hip Hop class at
    San Francisco State University, Marvin X's alma mater. He was a founding member of the Black Students Union.
    photo Davey D

    Notes of Artistic Freedom Fighter Marvin X 
    Now Available
    Order your copy from
    Black Bird Press
    requested donation
    $29.95
    call 510-575-7148
    credit cards accepted

    Marvin X
    Poet, playwright, essayist, educator, activist
    speaking/reading
    University of Chicago, 2015
    photo Burrell Sunrise

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  • 01/05/19--16:08: The Wall Hypocrites
  • The Wall hypocrites





    Mending Wall


    Something there is that doesn't love a wall,
    That sends the frozen-ground-swell under it,
    And spills the upper boulders in the sun;
    And makes gaps even two can pass abreast.
    The work of hunters is another thing:
    I have come after them and made repair
    Where they have left not one stone on a stone,
    But they would have the rabbit out of hiding,
    To please the yelping dogs. The gaps I mean,
    No one has seen them made or heard them made,
    But at spring mending-time we find them there.
    I let my neighbour know beyond the hill;
    And on a day we meet to walk the line
    And set the wall between us once again.
    We keep the wall between us as we go.
    To each the boulders that have fallen to each.
    And some are loaves and some so nearly balls
    We have to use a spell to make them balance:
    "Stay where you are until our backs are turned!"
    We wear our fingers rough with handling them.
    Oh, just another kind of out-door game,
    One on a side. It comes to little more:
    There where it is we do not need the wall:
    He is all pine and I am apple orchard.
    My apple trees will never get across
    And eat the cones under his pines, I tell him.
    He only says, "Good fences make good neighbours."
    Spring is the mischief in me, and I wonder
    If I could put a notion in his head:
    "Why do they make good neighbours? Isn't it
    Where there are cows? But here there are no cows.
    Before I built a wall I'd ask to know
    What I was walling in or walling out,
    And to whom I was like to give offence.
    Something there is that doesn't love a wall,
    That wants it down." I could say "Elves" to him,
    But it's not elves exactly, and I'd rather
    He said it for himself. I see him there
    Bringing a stone grasped firmly by the top
    In each hand, like an old-stone savage armed.
    He moves in darkness as it seems to me,
    Not of woods only and the shade of trees.
    He will not go behind his father's saying,
    And he likes having thought of it so well
    He says again, "Good fences make good neighbours."


    Do those who protest the white nationalist Wall on the US border, also protest the Zionist wall in occupied Palestine? Do the Democratic Socialist pseudo progressives and their left wing sycophants protest the weekly slaughter of those who approach the border fence separating the Zionists from the Gaza concentration camp?
    For the most part, all we  hear is the song of Silent Night on the Zionist wall, but wailing and crocodile tears about  the wall on the US/Mexican border. I don't understand why there isn't total agreement between America's left and right wing Zionist Zealots that the Zionist wall should be the model for the US/Mexican border wall. Furthermore, did not America's greatest poet Robert Frost tell us fences make good neighbors? 
    As a matter of national security, how can America justify spending nearly a trillion dollars on its defense budget but squabble over five billion requested by the Trump administration for the security of the USA. 
    The truth, supreme irony and contradiction  is that the globalist democratic socialists and many Republicans in league with the Globalists, believe in open borders while many of them live behind walled compounds! Even upper and middle class Mexicans and other Latinos throughout the Indigenous Americas live behind walled compounds and villas, including some of my Communists friends in the Americas.
    Growing up in the agricultural valley of California, my family never locked our doors. There were too many siblings in my Mother's house to issue keys to all. And Granny would never turn away a hungry stranger from her door when we lived with her in the projects. Of course this is in harmony with the African tradition delineated by Cheikh Anta Diop in his classic Cultural Unity of Africa as per his theory of the Northern and Southern Cradle. The Northern Cradle custom would kill the stranger, the Southern Cradle welcomed the stranger. I remember hungry white men stopping by Granny's house in the projects and she did not hesitate to feed them whatever food she had available. 

    Of course in his Destruction of African Civilization, Chancellor Williams taught this attitude and tradition lead to our downfall and the Black Panther Wakanda Kingdom's xenophobia eclipsed the Diopian Southern Cradle model.  I have observed the Wakandan zenophobia from San Francisco's Hunters Point to South Carolina's Gullahland, i.e., "If you ain't from here don't come here!" Of course gentrification is smashing this xenophobic notion. Whites are invading Hunters Point and Gullahland, especially since the Hip Hop generation of Gullah Africans care nothing about their paradise islands. They rather die in the streets of Savannah and Atlanta!
    Perhaps the Democratic Socialists should continue their call for open borders and sanctuary cities and states. Perhaps the USA should forget about fencing and walling the border and allow the USA to continue being the haven for every hateful unclean bird. If so, why continue funding the trillion dollar annual military budget for the national security of the USA? For sure, the budget did not prevent 9/11. So America should continue being the haven for every filthy unclean bird. After all, they can join the USA's filthy unclean birds. We heard filthy unclean birds flock together!
    While President Trump called a plethora of nations shit-holes, has not America's most beautiful city, my beloved San Francisco, become a shit-hole? But the supreme irony is that while  San Francisco is the epic center of the high tech revolution, its white supremacist and globalist myopia has totally neglected the very least of its citizens. I speak as one who was once drug addicted and homeless, who slept in the Tenderloin doorways, allies in cardboard boxes and often with nothing but my black  ass. 
    Finally, from ancient Egypt (Kemit) to the mythical African kingdom of Wakanda to America, national security can be comedic or tragic, but it should and must be addressed for the benefit of  all its citizens, first and foremost! Woe to the hypocrites!
    --MARVIN X
    1/5/19



    Marvin X, poet, philosopher, essayist, playwright, planner, educator, organizer, historian




     Angela Davis, Marvin X and Sonia Sanchez


     West Oakland OGs at Defermery Park, aka Bobby Hutton Grove

     


     Ancestor Amiri Baraka, "My brother like no other!"--Marvin X


     Marvin X in Harlem reception in his honor at home of Rashidah Ishmaili, 2014

     Academy of da Corner, Oakland: left to right: Amiri Baraka, Bobby Seale, Dr. Ayodele Nzinga, Ahi Baraka and Marvin X
    photo Gene Hazzard


     Marvin X fan club members
    photo Kamau Amen Ra (RIP)

    Marvin X in Heaven, i.e., in the presence of revolutionary, intelligent, beautiful African women
    photo Ken Johnson


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    Marvin X  Tour  2019

    February 16, Sat
    Alameda CA
    Reading/ book signing
    Back 2 Nature Wellness Salon
    and Barber Shop
    475 Central Avenue
    3-6pm

    February 22, Friday
    Reading book signing
    Hunters Point, San Francisco
    5:30-7:30
    901 Fairfax Avenue

    February 23, Saturday
    Oakland 
    Reading/book signing
    BAMFEST


    Marvin X reading at Charles Wright Museum, Detroit MI, December 15, 2018. He has been invited back at another venue for Black History Month
    photo Leona McElevene

    February 28, Thursday
    Detroit, MI
    TBA


    March 2, Saturday
    Reading/book signing
    Philadelphia PA
    Brothers Network
    TBA

    May
    Reading/book signing
    Seattle WA
    Host Hakeem Trotter
    TBA

    August 
    National Black Theatre Festival
    Winston-Saleem, North Carolina
    TBA

    October
    Austin, Texas
    How We Got Ova 1619-2019
    A poetic myth/ritual dance drama 
    by El Muhajir, aka Marvin X



    Train in da Water
    poem by Marvin X
    "In the Atlantic ocean is a railroad of human bones...."--Amiri Baraka


    Train came to ocean
    we riding in da water
    Riding waves bout to go under
    How sweet da waves
    train went under
    Passing da many fish
    As we submerged
    How pleasant da train
    Going down slowly
    another space for peace
    Let da ocean wash us with love
    We connect the bones of Baraka's railroad
    train rides down into darkness
    where no light is needed.
    we  black ocean same.

    --1/13/19


    The X Men: Marvin X, son Marvin K, grandsons Jordan and Jahmeel

    Dear Black Folks,

    Stay out of white folks bizness. They stay out of our bizness in the hood, even though they supply the guns, dope, sick religion, . mis-education, toxic food, water, air; death music rap beats, perverted psycho-sexuality of  do yo thang, be what ya wanna be; totally insane political policies  that violate their own laws at the drop of a hat, e.g., sanctuary cities and states. Imagine what white folks would do if we declared the hood a sanctuary space that excluded Europe American entrance and jurisdiction and banned them from arresting North American African criminals for any reason without our consent. We establish and adjudicate all violations in our space. Imagine this!

    Stay out of white folks bizness. They suffer a malady far worse than white Supremacy. Our ancestors and elders called their condition white lunacy.

    Let them fight among themselves. Let them have their second Civil War. That's their bizness not ours. Our  business is to establish a sovereign, independent nation. The master and slave do not have the same agenda.
    --Marvin X
    1/14/19

    Poet/Essayist/Educator/Activist Marvin X after his lecture/discussion in Davey D's Hip Hop class at
    San Francisco State University, Marvin X's alma mater. He was a founding member of the Black Students Union.
    photo Davey D

    Notes of Artistic Freedom Fighter Marvin X 
    Now Available
    Order your copy from
    Black Bird Press
    requested donation
    $29.95
    call 510-575-7148
    credit cards accepted


    Marvin X
    Poet, playwright, essayist, educator, activist
    speaking/reading
    University of Chicago, 2015

    photo Burrell Sunrise

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    Parable of the Patriarch and Misanthrope




    No misogynist
    homophobic
    sexist pig
    no racist
    hater white nationalist
    hater
    Democratic Socialist
    Communist
    Marxist
    Troskyist
    Maoist 
    been there did that
    just don't like humans
    fake phony fraud motherfuckas
    all up in yo face
    fake love rapper say
    I say
    low information vibration 
    humankind
    world of make believe
    material girls and boys
    ignut of spiritual world
    parents/ children on animal plane
    no seekers of truth
    lovers of lies
    lie to me lie to me
    my lover said
    you lie so good
    lie nigga lie
    but I told truth
    my over  said goodbye
    low information vibration
    Qur'an say
    animal plane
    human plane
    divine plane
    are you animal human divine?
    you fine fine fine
    but what's on yo mind?
    Girl T shirt said
    Cute but Psycho!
    you fine
    big behind
    what's on yo mind?
    treat ya like a ho'
    ya love me so
    treat ya like a queen
    ya hate me mean
    children same
    abandon neglect
    you love me
    give you everything
    ya hate me
    ungrateful bastards
    we call them
    how you smarter'n yo daddy
    did you suffer exile jail prison
    black listed white listed
    house arrest
    hated by friends and foe
    traveled wit baddest niggas to and fro'
    what do you know
    goin' to and fro'
    square nigga in round world
    what did you do
    went to school where yo daddy put his life ona line to teach
    made things better fada whole town
    but you got a frown
    ain't never went down
    funky town
    you daddy's twin
    you say where similarities end
    you fool
    school can't help a fool
    material things can't help a fool
    monkey in tuxedo still monkey

    I say call me
    you say fa what?
    cause I'm yo daddy motherfucka
    call yo daddy motherfucka
    think you got forever
    they say child abuse when parent don't call child
    What about elderly abuse when you won't call mama daddy
    I love what Tupac told his Mama
    "You might be a Crack fiend Mama
    But you still a Black Queen Mama!"
    Call me fa what? Cause I love you.
    Is this enough
    you got my DNA
    in deep structure of mental spiritual

    I don't hate you
    love you beyond love
    if you knew
    fool
    school can't help a fool
    don't know a good deck
    four Ace of Spades
    But I love you still
    stop fakin' ya doin' God's will
    you and your Father are one
    fool
    How can you hate Father
    Are you not Father's number one son
    Shall your children hate you
    for all good you have done 
    under the sun
    what goes around comes around
    did they teach you dat in school
    fool?
    For my abuse of women
    I lost eye
    I understand why
    what goes round comes round
    low information vibration
    My barber say mis-information
    bless his heart
    moved his shop from mis-information colleagues
    barber said he needed to be round more mature personalities
    don't wanna kill a nigga owe him fifty dollars
    just know there are fifty dollar fools in da world

    Again, why I hate human beings?
    They pitiful
    Chris Rock say to women
    "Everything bout you is a lie!"
    I say of men and women
    Everything bout you is a lie!
    truth ain't in ya.

    Feed a nigga
    dope a nigga
    Hennessy a nigga
    pay a nigga
    nigga hate ya guts
    nigga jealous envious

    Sun Ra say
    What kind of people are these
    ain't people I used to know
    Birmingham Alabama people
    They say brother
    What kinna brother
    Sunny say to me
    What kinna brother
    brother man
    brother beast
    brother girl

    I say long ago
    what kinna people are these
    really make ya wonder
    Hurry Allah
    wit da fire water!

    you sacrifice fada people
    will da people sacrifice
    fada people?

    Black Panthers say
    Power to the people
    US Constitution say
    power to consent of the governed
    do you consent to the present order of terror
    economic terror
    military religious terror
    slave wage terror
    90% don't have $1,000.00 in bank
    99% survive from check to check

    Elijah said it best
    trick trick out  trick!
    Reverse Tricknology 
    bring nigga back from dead
    deaf dumb blind

    Granddaughter Naima say
    Can deaf dumb blind
    see
    no
    hear
    no
    speak
    no
    I say Stevie Wonder can see
    Ray Charles could see
    better'n you and me
    Ray told bout Danger Zone
    Ray say
    Look round
    you will see
    what's troublin' me
    Danger Zone everywhere
    Read yo papers
    you will see
    Danger Zone Everywhere.

    I ain't no hater
    I'm a lover
    like no other
    just don't come at me wit willie foo foo bullshit
    been wit coldest niggas in da world
    I know shit from Shinola
    Know Ginger Ale
    from Coca-Cola

    I love my chidren
    a thousand times than they shall ever know
    love their mothers
    my siblings too

    I only have a minute more wit you
    So I shall be true true true
    Love the family God bequest to you
    love them for their negrocities (Amiri Baraka term--he told me don't steal his term!)
    love them beyond similarities of the physical
    love them for the DNA  the metaphysical.
    --Marvin X
    1/15/19