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A journal dedicated to truth, freedom of speech and radical spiritual consciousness. Our mission is the liberation of men and women from oppression, violence and abuse of any kind, interpersonal, political, religious, economic, psychosexual. We believe as Fidel Castro said, "The weapon of today is not guns but consciousness."
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    Violence is as american as cherry pie!--H. Rap Brown, Imam Jamil Alamin


    America has a trillion dollar defense budget but can't secure its school children, college students, church WORSHIPERS, politicians, night CLUBBERS, victims of police murder under the color of law.  she has hundreds of military bases around the world and is the number one arms merchant of the world, so until she recovers from her addiction to white supremacy domination, violence shall continue in america unabated.--Marvin X



    The murder of my child will not make your child safe!--James Baldwin


    The United States has made serious mistakes in the conduct of its foreign affairs, which have had unfortunate repercussions long after the decisions were taken. Unqualified support of the Shah of Iran led directly to the Islamic revolution of 1979. Then the United States chose to arm and finance the [Islamic] mujahedin in Afghanistan instead of supporting and encouraging the moderate wing of the government of Afghanistan. That is what led to the Taliban in Afghanistan. But the most catastrophic action of the United States was to sabotage the decision that was painstakingly stitched together by the United Nations regarding the withdrawal of the Soviet Union from Afghanistan. If you look at those matters, you will come to the conclusion that the attitude of the United States of America is a threat to world peace. Because what [America] is saying is that if you are afraid of a veto in the Security Council, you can go outside and take action and violate the sovereignty of other countries. That is the message they are sending to the world. That must be condemned in the strongest terms. And you will notice that France, Germany Russia, China are against this decision. It is clearly a decision that is motivated by George W. Bush's desire to please the arms and oil industries in the United States of America. --Nelson Mandela

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    AMERICA HAS A TRILLION DOLLAR DEFENSE BUDGET BUT CAN'T SECURE ITS SCHOOL CHILDREN, COLLEGE STUDENTS, CHURCH WORSHIPERS, POLITICIANS, NIGHT CLUBBERS, VICTIMS OF POLICE MURDER UNDER THE COLOR OF LAW.  SHE HAS HUNDREDS OF MILITARY BASES AROUND THE WORLD AND IS THE NUMBER ONE ARMS MERCHANT OF THE WORLD, SO UNTIL SHE RECOVERS FROM HER ADDICTION TO WHITE SUPREMACY DOMINATION, VIOLENCE SHALL CONTINUE IN AMERICA UNABATED.
    --MARVIN X

    Children and the National Security of America



    The latest mass killing in Florida at the school that left 17 children dead and an equal number wounded, including teachers, recalls the apology poet Askia Toure gave for our generation leaving work undone in the 60s struggle for liberation. When I listened to him speak at the University of California, Merced,  I rejected his apology, even took the mike to explain that we who fought 
    America's domestic colonialism faced the military might of the United States, the awesome power of the US 
    Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, National Guard, CIA, FBI, snitches and agent provocateurs. In short, we suffered a military defeat, especially with the additional force of drug and chemical warfare. We 
    thus left this generation in obvious peril at the hands of an inept, corrupt society of adults, whether politicians, educators, law enforcement, religious leaders and others duty-bound to secure our 
    children. And race is totally and absolutely irrelevant, for our children are in danger from inner cities 
    to suburbs, from urban centers to rural communities.

    We saw the inability of the US military machine to prevent 9/11, and all the terrorist acts that have taken place on this soil before and after 9/11, including school shootings, church shootings, Las 
    Vegas, Florida's LGBT nightclub, Fort Hood Military Base, etc.

    I am at a loss to tell our children we have passed the baton of a wretched land to them, which was 
    the reason for Askia's apology. . We did what we could to make America the so called land of the 
    free and home of the brave.

    A few months ago my daughter begged me to pass the baton to her generation because they are qualified and ready. Well, recent events in Florida appear to be the straw that broke the camel's back. But this time it is not the adults but the children themselves who, in spite of their trauma and grief, 
    have transcended the horror of their lives to take authority over their situation.

    Initially, they are appealing to adults to solve the problem of their security, but we know from past events adults are incapable of securing their lives because of political expediency, thus we suspect 
    our children shall  be  left with no alternative but to secure they own lives.

    After they march on Washington and see no solution, we suspect they will gather to secure themselves. We think their ROT C's may be one answer. Alas, the killer at the Florida school was a member and wore his ROTC T-shirt on the day of death.

    Yet, as we discovered in our teaching career that peer teaching is a great method to exhibit 
    leadership and diffuse chaos in the classroom, the ROTC or some other student led security project may be the alternative to the utter failure of adult leadership in school security.

    Anytime authorities visit the house of a mentally ill student 39 times and can't discern a serious problem, yes, even after the sick boy announced on social media he wanted to be a school killer, and it was reported to the FBI, we know adults are useless and no faith must be placed in them. Students 
    are thus on their own and have no choice but to secure their own lives.

    Even their parents are useless, thus they have no choice but to configure plans to save their lives themselves. Dismiss the notion their brains are not fully developed until age 25, they must take authority immediately to secure themselves since adults cannot. Let us not hear about mental health treatment and gun control, the hour for talk has passed and our children have no choice but to take authority over their lives.The best adults can do is shut up and let their/our children take control.

    During the Crack Era, many parents were out of control so children who had to take control of the household, even going to work or even prostituting to put food in the house, sometimes to pay the 
    rent, since their parents were lost in the world of addiction.

    Today adults are lost in political agendas that persist with each election, no matter whether 
    Republican or Democrat, so let children take control until adults crawl out of their world of make 
    believe that is so pathological that even with a trillion dollar military budget, they cannot secure the lives of their children but rather continue eternal wars for the arms industry.
    ---Marvin X
    2/20/18


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    Adult performer/director and alleged Trump paramour Stormy Daniels (left), adult performer/director Asa Akira, and adult performer/director jessica drake (who has accused Trump of sexual assault).


    Don't nobody care about Donald Trump and his ho's. Back in my polygamous days, one of my wives called my mother to inform her she too was one of my wives. The wife told me my mother said, "Please, I don't want to hear anything about my son and his wives. Please don't call me anymore!"

    My wife didn't understand Mom had had enough of me and my many wives, especially when I abused them. She told me I would never have any good luck as long as I abused them, especially the mother's of my children.

    As per our  lascivious President, not only do Americans (including Christians) not care that he is a whore-monger, but care even less that he paid them to be silent. Now what man would not tell his ho' don't make known their affair? Matter of fact, here is a bonus to shut yo mouth!

    Some cities publish the names of Johns or tricks when they are caught in anti-prostitution stings. I remember when I was caught in a sting and went to jail with several other Johns. One brother called his wife to inform her he was arrested for a traffic violation but his wife retorted, "Nigga, stop lying, I just saw yo ass on the Ten O'clock News."

    I've long called for the legalization of prostitution, especially after LGBT organized to win their rights. It is only because men are not organized that prostitution is still illegal.

    If President Trump didn't have so many demons after him, I would suggest he push for the legalization of prostitution, especially to stop abusive sex trafficking and to protect the rights of sex workers.
    --Marvin X
    3/25/18

    SATURDAY, MAY 14, 2016


    GAYS/LESBIANS MARRIED/TRANS IN THE RESTROOMS--TIME FOR MEN WHO LOVE SEX WORKERS AND MULTIPLE WIVES TO STAND UP



     
    Now that gays and lesbians can marry and trans people can enter any restroom or locker room, isn't it time for men who desire multiple wives and sex workers to come out of the closet? If men who desire polygamy and sex workers will get organized, they can fulfill their desires just as others have done in this wild crazy world. The reason the LGBT community acquired rights is because they organized to do so. What is wrong with these weak ass men who won't get their nuts out the sand but rather complain about what gays, lesbians and trans people are doing. What does it matter what they do when you can't do what you want to do? I am not concerned about what somebody else is doing, I only care about what I want to do. Now if I can't do what I want to do, we got a real problem up in here! But the solution is political, not to engage in pseudo moral pronouncements that make people hypocritical. As men, we should be ashamed of ourselves for being organized to obtain the rights we desire and need. Why should grown men not be able to be with their sex workers in peace? I'm talking about legal prostitution, not having sex with children and women sex slaves.

    Long ago my friend, then Assemblyman Willie L. Brown, pushed through legislation permitting sex between consenting adults, so why are men still sneaking around in the alley like a broke dick dog, facing arrest, cars seizures  and other humiliations to be in a mutual agreement with sex workers?

    It's time to legalize prostitution and regulate it as it is in the State of Nevada. When I taught English at the University of Nevada, Reno, 1979, no preachers talked against gambling and prostitution. One Black Holy Ghost COGIC preacher received a Cadillac donated by the owner of Mustang Ranch, a venue for legal prostitution.

    I'm totally against the trafficking of sex slaves and the spread of disease. As per polygamy, I was not successful with monogamy or polygamy. Mama told me I didn't need a wife, "You need a maid, secretary and mistress, but not a wife!" Obviously, Mama was right, I just can't figure out how she knew so much about her son!
    --Marvin X
    5/14/16

    Marvin X is author of a ghetto classic The Mythology of Pussy and Dick. He will soon publish a 400 page version of the 18 page pamphlet that has proven to be a healing treatise for those trapped in the patriarchal mythology.



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    In this XXX rated video, we see black porn star Kapri Styles using porn to fight racism and white supremacy while on her job as a sex queen,  talking shit in her imitable style to her white high school coach  who threatens to report her for smoking cigarettes at school if she doesn't submit to having sex with him.




     Black Goddess Kapri Styles


    Kapri Styles transcends her angelic African body by spitting language reminiscent of the Black Arts Movement Theatre, especially the dramas of Amiri Baraka, Ed Bullins and Marvin X. But neither Amiri, Ed Bullins or Marvin X equal combined equal the resistance language of  Kapri Styles in its intensity as she repeatedly denounces her rapist. who imagines he has conquered her mind, body and soul. 

    Brothers have viewed this video but immediately concluded Kapri passively submitted to her rapist simply because he kept his penis in her mouth and told her he didn't care what black resistance songs she sang. 

    Of course the rapist is about power and domination, but Kapri gets her message to her audience and we sympathize with her no matter that the master thinks he has conquered her once again, but he has not. Kapri's verbal resistance is enough to let her audience appreciate her as a revolutionary sister who used the only weapon she had, her mouth, to let the master know he may have conquered her body be he never approached the depths of her soul! 

    What else matters? Flesh is muscle, an illusion that one can think he has  conquered the essence when the very idea is not only an illusion but a delusion of the demented mind of the colonizer. What did Dr. Frantz Fanon say, "All decolonization is successful."


    And as per the Black Arts Movement and Hip Hop, where do you place Kapri as actress and spoken word artist? Has Hip Hop acknowledged "video ho's" who and still are pervasive in  the Bitch, Ho, Motherfucker genre that persists!  Hip Hop must address the debasement of women as all men and women must do globally ASAP!

    Ancestor August Wilson's commercial success was partly do to his skills in walking up to the linguistic precipice that Ed Bullins penetrated with his acceptable Off Broadway productions though rich linguistically in the BAM tradition and the Philly life Ed endured and dramatized as no one else did.. 

    August Wilson, for sure, cannot equal the rawness of Kapri's  resistance language and tone of defiance that she may have absorbed from the Hip Hop Five Per centers whose mythology and linguistics come  directly from the Nation of Islam via Clarence 13X, founder of the Five Per Cent Nation of Gods and Earths.



    But if you know any North American African artists who speak in a similar vain as Kapri, please inform me. 

    As per myself, I want readers to know my short film Marvin X Driving Miss Libby is linguistically and dramatically derived from Paul Robeson's performance in Emperor Jones. As I wrote Marvin X Driving Libby, I was consciously or even unconsciously  aware I was traveling in the middle of Paul Robeson's Emperor Jones and Kapri Styles verbal resistance to white supremacy. 



    It is deeply disturbing that socalled conscious brothers and sisters cannot rise above the low information vibration and the resultant world of make believe to enjoy the work of a master actress in the persona of Kapri Styles, even though she works in the pornography industry that is, you will surely agree, only a nano second above Hollywood in conspiracy with Silicon Valley. 



    Kapri submits to being raped but fights her white rapist with a plethora of razor cutting words, she calls him soda cracker, white devil, honky, Satan, horned devil, uncle sam, yankee, pink dick honky, etc.  


    Her reaction to rape gives us a verbal expression of the resistance our women ancestors no doubt showered upon their slave masters down to the present day sexual violation of black women by white bosses on the job. Our women did what ever necessary in order  to survive the capitalist world of make believe and conspicuous consumption, i.e., all things can be bought, sold for a price, or taken by violent means, as long as the white slave master satisfies his pathological desire of joyful domination, sexual and economic, though we suspect his psychopathic personality is beyond even money and power. Jesus said it best, "You are a liar and murderer and abode not in the truth. If God were your Father you would love me, but you seek to kill me because I tell you truth. If you were Abraham's children, you would do the works of Abraham." 

    There is no spiritual dimension with those addicted to White Supremacy. The master is constitutionally unable to rise above the low information vibration of bestiality.  In Black Mass, Amiri Baraka noted, "Where the soul's print should be, there is only a cellulose pouch of disgusting habits!" 


    I respect and appreciate the beautiful and eloquent Kapri (I dare anyone view other videos of Kapri Styles and deny she is a consummate actor.



    After viewing her in this video, even conscious brothers  have told me they would like to see more of her body beautiful and I concur along with a female friend who especially appreciated her verbosity, along with her angelic body, indefatigable spirit and tenacity.



    For sure, the white honky cares nothing about her protests and denunciations  as long as his pink dick is in her mouth and pussy. Even today, those enjoying the privilege of White Supremacy, simply ignore cries of the poor and dispossessed. 

    In her field nigga rhetoric of resistance,  she  reminds the honky, devil, uncle sam, yankee she is not his slave only because she does not recognize him as master, i.e., there can be no slaves if they refuse to submit to the master! She thus transcended her oppressor into the land of mental freedom.  In the film Black Panther, Killmonger,before his death, declares his African ancestors were those who jumped into the ocean rather than submit to eternal slavery in the Americas. The Holy Qur'an says, "Oppression is worse than slaughter!" Kapri submitted in the physical moment, but in the mythology of BAM Master Sun Ra, Father of Afrofuturiusm, she was on the other side of Time! She thus represented the Afro-futuristic notion of past-present and future as one time that
    Sun Ra called Infinity. He called his band the Myth-Science Infinity Arkestra.  



    We think her words are revolutionary for all those women who need a script when confronted by white supremacy sexual exploitation. We urge all pseudo conscious revolutionary/radical, BAM/Hip Hop/Kemetic/Muslim/Christian/Yoruba/Jah PC puritans to take a moment and escape their box of moral and ideological dogmatism and listen to a sister verbalizing what our ancestors said when confronted with the real motherfucker, fatherfucker and childrenfucker. Think about all the women suffering such sexual aggression in all levels of economic wage slavery. Some of you who watched the video say, "Oh, well, she did what she had to do and the master dismissed her verbosity since he was satisfying himself with a recalcitrant and incorrigible wench, and a most beautiful one at that. Whoever wrote the script, I thank them because for me it was inspirational to see the sister spouting words of resistance. Some viewers replied saying they would have been satisfied if she had knifed him. For me, her words were a thousand knives on behalf of millions of our sisters and all women who were/are forced to endure sexual assault in the past and in the present era. 

    --Marvin X
    3/30/18 

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    photo Johnnie Burrell

    The San Francisco Bay Area humbly celebrated, in a private ceremony, the 85th B Day of our most esteemed scholar and African healer, Dr. Nathan Hare, father of Black and Ethnic Studies, the intellectual warrior who has been Black, or rather White listed, and confined to house arrest over half a century for simply thinking black, loving black and sacrificing his life for black in the world of white supremacy and multiculturalism that his wife, Dr. Julia Hare said, "Multiculturalism is but another term for failed integration." 

    I say, "If multiculturalism is so great, why are we yet on the bottom rung of the multicultural ladder?" Further, what are we bringing to the multicultural table? The Latinos come with their agenda, Asians with theirs, whites with theirs, LGBT with theirs, so what is our agenda? A job, job, job? Whites are seizing land and property, Latinos, Asians, LGBT the same, so what is our priority agenda item beyond a motherfuckin, goddamn punk ass job that was described by one of our elders as an indirect welfare handout called JOB?

    Meanwhile, we are gentrified into tents and out of town, state and country, yes, have you heard of Blaxit, the current move of North American Africans to Ghana? But with the recent US military agreement with Ghana, how can we be sure Ghana is the panacea for the psycho-social issues of North American Africans or even Continental Africans? 

    Furthermore, we are told North American Africans are the cause of gentrification in Ghana! So we cannot be sure if and when tribalism resurfaces as it did in South Africa with Zimbabwean refugees, also in Guyana, South America, when North American Africans got jobs in key government ministries that caused jealousy and envy among the native population, especially when the opposition leader married a North American African woman. 

    Minister Farrakhan said, "No matter where I traveled throughout the world, whether Christian, Muslim, Jewish, Communist, Socialist or Capitalist country, the black man and woman were on the bottom!" 

    I say check out America: blacks fill the jails, go to Israel, Africans fill the jails. Go to Brazil, a black woman politician was recently assassinated fighting for African Brazilian human rights. 

    Oakland Poet Paradise Jah Love's poem is a classic, "They Love Everything About Me But Me!" 

    They can call each other nigga around the world in hip hop culture but still hate niggas. And for sure, niggas still hate niggas, yet denounce the N word even though it is a billion dollar word we should capitalize on instead protest its usage. If we had a billion dollar word, wouldn't it be common sense for us to take advantage of it instead of protesting? 

    With Black Panther, we have a billion dollar film, whether we got pimped as per usual, or totally agree with it or not,but shouldn't we want to examine how we as Africans and North American Africans can benefit from its success, even if we don't like it, including the fact that the only  North American Africans in the film were villains, a black man and woman, despite the overwhelming historical fact that Africans sold us to the Europeans and both Africans and Europeans enjoyed 400 years of surplus capital from the slave trade, minus the cost of human labor.  Thus, North American Africans have nothing to feel guilty about. For sure, we resisted and protested every day of our 400 year trauma, grief and genocide. See Negro Slave Revolts by Melville Herskovitts. See the Historical Channel's Slave Catchers and Resisters, the best documentary of African resistance to the American Slave System (Ed Howard term).

    A segment of North American Africans identify with the socalled villain Killmonger, especially when he said before his death at the hands of the Wakandan's, "My ancestors are those who jumped off the slave ships rather than be victims of the eternal slave system in the Americas."
    The Qur'an says, "Persecution is worse than slaughter." So many of us conscious North Americans departed the cinemas shouting Killmonger for Life!" Yes, no matter a majority of Africans, North American Africans and Africans in the Diaspora saluted the mythical kingdom of Wakanda in their romantic notion of the African kings and queens who benefited in their enslavement, just as the low information vibration celebrate the Obamas even though they were globalists and imperialists in black face, no different from the plethora black face neo-colonial African leaders on the continent and throughout the Pan African Diaspora.

    Rainbow flag Racism and White Supremacy




    Long ago,  the LBGT community informed me the rainbow flag does not represent them, that it is but another symbol of racism and white supremacy. Joe Hawkine s, founder of the Oakland LGBT Center has partnered with our forthcoming Teach-In and Testimonial: Racism and White Supremacy in the Bay Area. FYI, a brother traveled to Peru and told me the LGBT was stolen from Peru. White supremacists, no matter what gender, religion or political persuasion are still white supremacists and we suspect they, in the words of Mao, will never put down their butcher knives and turn into Buddha heads, unless they agree to go into long term recovery to address their severe condition of addiction to white supremacy.

    As a straight man, after over a half century in the Black Arts Movement and the BAM coast to coast, I have "had no choice but to appreciate the genius and extraordinarily talent of artists beyond the socially acceptable heterosexual gender. Gay brothers have portrayed my son who was a straight man. Lesbian women have portrayed straight women in my dramas. Alas, if you are an actor, for sure, you must adapt, understand all personas in the human and sexual spectrum. Alas, as a writer, I must comprehend and appreciate the human dilemma no matter what sexual orientation. If I can't, it would be wise for me to give up the art of writing!

    Yes, Dr. Nathan Hare was/is too black for the pseudo black conscious intellectuals in perpetual crisis (see Harold Cruse, Crisis of the Negro Intellectual) and academic negroes, including the Kemetic, Pan African Youtube scholars of today that he says live in the Kingdom of Afrikanna or shall we say Wakanda, the mythical kingdom of make believe, best described Sociologist Dr. E. Franklin Frazier in his classic Black Bourgeoisie. 

    but especially those tenured niggas who obtained neo-colonial elite jobs for life from their vampiric sucking of his black intellectual and edrevolutionary blood. Dr. Nathan Hare shares the honored tradition of intellectual resistance fighters from David Walker, Henry Highland Garnett, W.E.B. DuBois, Paul Robeson, et al, including women like Harriett Tubman, 

    Saturday, March 31, 2018




    Marvin X and his Master Teacher, Dr. Nathan Hare, father of Black and Ethnic Studies. He holds PhDs in Sociology and Clinical Psychology, founder of Black Scholar Magazine. Black academia, i.e., Howard University, and white academia, San Francisco State University, kicked him out because of his unapologetic Black revolutionary consciousness. He and his wife, Julia, were a formidable couple who preached Black Power/Black Love. A London, England newspaper called Julia the female Malcolm X! See her speech at Tavis Smiley's State of the Black Nation, Youtube. See below Dr. Nathan Hare's Love Song to Julia: "She Stood By Me" that appeared in The Movement Newspaper, published by Marvin X. Nathan is Senior Writer. 


    After spending 45 minutes stalled in traffic before we got to the San Francisco Bay Bridge toll gate and another 20 or 30 minutes at the light before the bridge, (an effort we pray never to repeat, which may mean we will never drive a car to San Francisco) we made it to San Francisco to the Russian Hill apartment building Drs. Julia and Nathan Hare have occupied since 1973. Only rent control saves them from the gentrified high rent prices. As I entered, our beloved African Queen Dr. Julia Hare was being taken from the living room to the bedroom. Apparently she had fallen asleep. Alzheimers has taken its toll on her but she came back from hospice a few years ago and has been under the tender loving care of her husband of sixty plus years. Many of us can't stay married sixty days!

    This afternoon Dr. Nathan Hare celebrated his 85th B day early at his home with friends and relatives  who discovered him through DNA. Two relatives flew into San Francisco from Chicago and Florida. He was happy and honored his DNA relatives came to town. He said to me that other blood relatives never come or call! Such is the state of the loving black family. 

     
    photo Johnnie Burrell

    As you see in the pic above, women were the majority in attendance, but most were women of power and authority. One said she was the only Black on her block of Divisadero Street. A life long San Francisco resident, in her retirement as an educator, she has traveled the world. She was present at my 2004 SF Tenderloin Black Radical Book Fair and wanted to know when I was going to do another. I told her it takes grant funds but I'm not in the begging mood these days. 

    Besides her, there were several San Francisco "Negroes" present. My own San Francisco days go back to 1964 when I enrolled at San Francisco State Collegey, now University, and even before, 1963, when I was a researcher at UC Berkeley's School of Criminology under the famed Chicago Sociologist Dean Lohman. I was still enrolled at Oakland's Merritt College, along with my comrades Huey P. Newton, Bobby Seale, and a host of other Black Nationalists under the influence of the African American Association, headed by Attorney Donald Warden, aka, Khalid Abdullah Tariq Al Mansour, including the Los Angeles representative of the AAA, Ron Karenga, who, I was informed, got the Kwanza from Oakland's AAA, that also inspired the Black Panther Party and the West Coast or Northern California Black Arts Movement.

    One was a low income housing advocate  who is part of a non-profit that has 35 buildings in San Francisco with subsidized housing available now. Another sister was a retired SF Police Officer (and she let me know that when people see her with her natural, they know what's she's about), but more importantly, she informed me she is in a group of women with disabilities who lost their homes after working to achieve the American dream of home ownership. She said many of her comrades are homeless and living on the street after not being able to maintain home ownership. Furthermore, she is a descendant of the first North American African who owned a barber shop in San Francisco and was the first Black bail bondsman in California. She wants to know why there is no historical monument or any mention to her ancestor. She said former Mayor Willie Brown could help her but hasn't. I told her to contact Mayor Willie Brown's best friend, Bentley  driving Charlie Walker, de facto Mayor of Hunters Point. 
    Nothing happens in Hunters Point that Charlie doesn't know about. When youth are killed by each other or the police, families come to Charlie Walker for burial expenses. He once told me, "Marvin, I will help my people but these young brothers can't come in my house with pants hanging off their behinds. I have extra belts for them!"

    Food was catered and there was so much left over, I took home enough for Easter dinner, including fried chicken, baked chicken, turkey, dressing, greens, Mac and cheese, cheesecake, banana pudding, peach cobbler. 

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    Marvin X Poem on the 85th B DAY OF Nathan Hare

    I wish I knew more beauty in the world
    beyond true love
    nathan and julia love
    beyond time forever love
    death do us part love
    wow
    who knows such
    only ephemeral love rules the day
    not love beyond love
    Sun Ra love
    other side of time love
    infinity love
    Sunny said what is this today love
    who are these people who claim love
    ain't the people I used to know
    Alabama love
    Chicago love
    love for life and beyond time and space love
    Nathan said
    I don't know how to put the woman I love in confinement
    After 56 years of marriage
    I don't know how
    We vowed death do us part love
    She stood by me
    I shall stand by her
    til death do us part
    --mx
    4/1/18

    SHE ALWAYS STOOD BY ME: IN PRAISE OF JULIA 

    By Dr. Nathan Hare


    I had seen her singing and dancing but didn’t know her – call her Julia, the name I gave her, her mother named her Julia Ann – when my high school principal took our senior class to the Tulsa, Oklahoma Booker T. Washington High School’s legendary annual production of “Hijinx.” I remember I was sitting in the upper balcony, far out of reach of her, and didn’t pay her that much mind. It was all a dream world. White folks called the balcony “Nigger Heaven,” but there were no whites around in those days of Jim Crow segregation, Hijinx was nevertheless put on downtown in the city of Tulsa’s Convention Hall, the place where the state militia less than three decades earlier had detained over six thousand black men for their safety, after more than 800 were hospitalized and an estimated 300 killed during the bombing of Black Wall Street, the only time whites have bombed blacks from the air in American history.

    But, two years after I saw her for the first time, I was walking across the all-black campus of Oklahoma’s Langston University with a friend one afternoon when I suddenly stopped and told him: “There’s that l’il ol’ skinny girl who was playing that piano last night, and won first prize in the Freshman Talent Show; I think I’ll take her to the movie.” And he laughed and bet me a dollar she wouldn’t go to no motion picture show with me, but he didn’t know she had made eye contact with me in the Dining Hall the year before when she came to visit her pal sister for Homecoming Week and, no sooner than she left to go back home, her sister slipped me a note from her, and I answered it, telling her I would like to get to know her better too; but my letter somehow fell into the hands of her over-protective mother, who was hoping to save her from the unhappy experiences with men that had befallen her older sisters. So that was the end of that.

    I myself was just a country boy, at the top of my class scholastically but born and raised on a farm forty miles from Black Wall Street, outside of Slick, Oklahoma, while Julia Ann Reed (eventually Dr. Julia Hare) was a city girl with personality and sass. So when we took up with each other, everybody said our relationship wouldn’t last, that even our sun signs didn’t match.

    But in less than two months I had given her a birthday gift of a recording of Nat King Cole’s hit song, “Unforgettable,” because I had seen she liked it so. I could see that she was thrilled to high heaven that I had even given it to her; and she would play it over and over on the juke box, and she and I would sometimes slow-dance together. But, while I could slow dance alright, especially in dark and familiar but unchaperoned places, and halfway jitterbug -- I didn’t know how to huckle buck at all, let alone to Suzie Q -- but Julia was a dancing queen.

    Sometimes when everybody was on the dancing floor in the Student Union Building, a gay artistic dancer, say, might take her hand and they would do the tango around the edge of the crowded dancing hall while we all stopped what we were doing and watched them go. And she was equally adept at the ballroom and the waltz. Students eventually voted her “Best Girl Dancer” campus-wide, as well as “Most Popular Girl”; and “Most Talented Girl.” For, not only was she one of the best piano players on the campus, in time she would become the regular university organist.

    When I graduated and left Langston on a Danforth Fellowship to study for the Ph.D. at the University of Chicago, a pretty big thing there in those days, Julia soon went to California in her childhood dream of someday making it in the music and entertainment world, and to help her older sister, an impregnated high school dropout with five children, whose husband had gone down to the drug store one night to get some medicine for one of their sick children and just kept going, never to be heard from until he turned up trying to make it in the jazz world in New York.

    Suffice it to say it was after considerable agony and ambivalence that Julia tabled her dreams for fame and fortune and rendezvoused with me in Tulsa and we were married in her mother’s house two days after Christmas when we were all of 23. Then in Chicago, rather than get by on my budgeted fellowship and a part-time job as a statistical clerk, Julia got a job as a substitute teacher.

    I used to feel sorry for her when she would get up winter mornings and cook me eggs and waffles and pancakes and bacon in time for her to be ready when her teachers van came in the cold to take her from the Southside of Chicago to teach unruly children in the Westside slums on the other side of the windy city.
    Soon her girlfriends and female coworkers began to cock their heads to the side and crow that they “wouldn’t work while no man went to school.” The reason I know she wasn’t lying is one of my sisters and her teacher friend upstairs told her that in my presence, to my face. They quipped that I was getting a Ph.D. while she was getting a PHT (Putting Hubby Through) and then go on to warn her that as soon as I got the Ph.D., I was going to leave her for a younger woman -- never mind that we were still in our twenties.
    But Julia stuck by me and persevered. Julia was the kind of woman who would stand by her man until he was headed in a better direction and she could get in front of him.

    I got the idea of persuading her to study for a master’s degree herself, so they would be jealous of both of us and by the time I got the Ph.D. she had earned an M.M.ED. from the music department of what is now Roosevelt University’s College of the Performing Arts. Although she would later also pick up a doctorate in educational psychology, an Ed.D., she was always fond of saying that she was proudest of her MRS, allowing that she had had to work so much harder for the MRS.

    When we left for Washington D.C., in part so I could join with E. Franklin Frazier, though he would end up dying before the end of the school year. Julia still had her own ambitions on hold, and she was taken aback when we got to D.C. and, in spite of her years of teaching experience in Chicago, plus one year each in Virginia and Oklahoma, the Board said she wasn’t qualified to be a substitute teacher in D.C., compelling her to commute in winter weather to teach in a white school in Maryland for a year before the black Board in D.C. deigned to hire her to teach in the black schools in the slums of the District.

    Yet In just four years, she would go on to win the Outstanding Young Educator Award (teachers 35 years old and under) from the Junior Chamber of Commerce collaborating with World Book Encyclopedia, with the expert judgment of the Department of Education at American University to recognize her as the most commendable teacher thirty-five and under for every grade level for all of the city of Washington, D.C.
    But the following year, I myself was fired from Howard University, along with another black professor and five white ones, for so-called “Black Power activities.” I returned to boxing, this time under my own name – I had quit before when two world champions were killed in the ring one year apart and she had already been getting the heebie-jeebies over the boxing, making big mirations over some cut lip or bloody nose. I’d tell her you ought to see the other guy. Then, after promising her I was going to quit, and did, two weeks later on All Fools Day, I took a shot or two of vodka and went down to the old Capitol Arena to see a friend fight, and was visiting in the dressing room, when somebody’s opponent didn’t show up and ,I agreed to take the fight, which was an easy win, but two deans recognized me fighting under the name of Nat Harris, and the top dean called me in in a day or two and gave me an ultimatum which almost motivated me to return if I hadn’t promised Julia. Anyway, I had one fight in the comeback under the name of Nathan Hare, winning by a knockout in the first round, before I was asked to become the Coordinator of Black Studies at San Francisco State University.

    Now Julia was not a conscious herself at that point, but a bourgeois lady suddenly challenged to become a revolutionary’s wife and drown her dreams in a revolutionary life. But San Francisco had always been her favorite city, and her two older sisters were still living in the Bay Area, and her school teacher coworkers had sometimes been snide to her about the things they read in the newspaper about me and Howard, and she had never wanted me to box anyway, let alone under my own name and everybody was waiting to see me on my back on the front page of the Washington Post with my feet sticking up -- so she pushed me, like most other people did, to accept the offer from San Francisco State.

    After closing out our apartment and her job as a laboratory teacher headed for the Board of Education, she came to San Francisco and went down to the Board of Education here, armed with the citywide award from Washington, D.C. and thirty units beyond the master’s degree and a passing score on the National Teachers Exam, only to be told that in order to be a substitute teacher in San Francisco, she would have to take a course in Teacher’s Arithmetic and another in California History.
    Makes you wanna holler.

    She declined the psychotic suggestion and within a couple of months the Director of the Oakland Museum preparing to reopen happened to be in the audience when she, unemployed, was speaking on a panel at the Black Today conference I was chairing at San Francisco State, and the museum director recruited her as Director of Education. She had worked the previous summer in a program directed by one of the bigtime museums in New York City.

    Julia was in her element at the Museum, and got on well with the society set. Aside from her interest in the arts, she was in her dream world social element, as she had come to admire Jackie Kennedy and was always studying the women’s and the fashion magazines, even before she worked at the Oakland Museum, and had a Saks card but was not a spendthrift and loved to shop anywhere, including the thrift stores, using Jackie Kennedy once more as an inspiration. She knew how to put what little clothes she had together. Sometimes her affluent friends would be affronted when they would throw down big money for something they saw in a clothing store window, then get to an occasion and everybody would be praising Julia’s outfit from the thrift shop, though, like I said, she was not averse to using her Saks card. One night we wound up at a high level reception where a blue collar woman I happened to know was also taken with thrift stores and also appeared to me to be an unusually creative dresser. I determined to introduce them to each other, but before I could do so, they had spied each other from across the room, though total strangers, and introduced themselves to each other.

    But that was the way she was.

    She worked at the Oakland Museum maybe a year while it was preparing to reopen and she and the white multimillionaire Director got the idea of making it a people’s museum and carry the art like Meals on Wheels to the people in the community. This horrified he museum’s docents, who had discovered her connection to me and hence the five-month strike for Black Studies raging at San Francisco State. For instance, one night Julia sat with the Director and his wife waiting for me for dinner at a downtown restaurant when they looked up and saw me getting arrested on the Walter Cronkite CBS Evening News, along with five hundred and fifty seven predominantly white Black Studies strikers at San Francisco State. The Oakland Museum Director was fired and eventually became President of the California Historical Society, but meanwhile I backed Julia’s wish to resign.

    Julia’s black consciousness also took a leap when James Baldwin’s sister, Dr. Rena Karefa Smart, invited me to speak to the Conference on Racism put on by the World Council of Churches in London in the spring of 1969, and I took Julia with me, stopping at St. Louis University on the way to pick up her fare, impressing her at the Custom’s window by nonchalantly counting and talking of pounds and shillings. She enjoyed the week in London, where I also took part in a demonstration with the daughters of Richad Wright, Rachel and Julia Wright. When we returned to San Francisco, Julia announced to me that she was going to start wearing an Afro.

    Her next job was as Public Information Director of the West tern Regional Office of the National Association Against Discrimination in Housing. Then, after two years she beat out seventy finalists for Community Affairs Director of Cowboy Gene Autry’s radio station in San Francisco, KSFO, where she flourished for all of ten years, including eventually some on-air broadcasting time in a sidekick role in the morning drive, until she ran into trouble with a new manager and took a part-time job as a talk show host with the number one talk show station in San Francisco. ABC’s KGO. However, in spite of the fact that she appeared to be one of the very best they had, they would not give her air time in the day time on weekdays, so she eventually sued the station for harassment and her three year contract was not renewed.

    Despite picking up a course for a while in the broadcasting department at the City College of San Francisco, unemployment at forty-eight was her darkest hour. Plus she was a people’s person, a performer, and didn’t like sitting at home, while I was a thinker and a writer and would have loved to change places with her as it was no accident that she became a radio talk show host and had married a psychotherapist, for whom listening had achieved the status of both an art form and a healing art.

    It hurt me to see how hard she was taking her fate. At the time, I was going around the country on the chitlin college lecture circuit pushing a male/female relationships movement on the wind of an incredibly popular editorial I had written for Ebony magazine, speaking out for a better black family based on Kupenda (Swahili for “to love”) black love groups I had been experimenting with at the time. I thought that it would be natural and nice to have a couple speaking on black male/female relationships instead of a solo spouse. I also was inspired by the fact that we had made our own poem rhyme as a couple, and wanted to share the love, so I asked her to come with me, and she agreed, and I named her “National Executive Director” of the Black Think Tank I was running at the time.

    Julia had always been a very good speaker – she’d won the award in “Auditorium” in the third grade in Tulsa, and the experience as a radio broadcaster and talk show host also seemed to augment her impromptu facility. Plus, people didn’t know she was farsighted and could see the copy standing back from the podium while also exploiting her radio broadcaster’s ability to read-talk off of next to nothing, causing it to appear that she wasn’t using any notes or anything at all.

    Having time all day, she used the time and worked hard learning the sociological material and preparing and practicing her speeches and was soon being hailed as “one of the most sought after motivational speakers in the country.” She spoke to most of all of the black women’s groups and even men’s groups, especially the mentoring conferences and began to be included in selections of distinguished black women. For instance she became a regular at the annual Essence Cultural Festival in New Orleans, but she spoke to all the leading black women’s groups and they all seemed to think a lot of her.

    Then, though not at her best when she appeared on the Tavis Smiley’s State of the Black Race Conference at Plymouth Rock in 2008, her comments went viral and seemingly all at once she got more than a million hits from around the world; but later, I stood perplexed after the widest circulating newspaper in Great Britain, “Black Voices,” gave her the two-page centerfold, under the headline, “The Female Malcolm X,” and offered to bring her for a tour of Europe, but she declined, saying she was afraid to fly over the ocean.
    Then, she began to forget and lose important and familiar things; which should have alerted me, but I was blinded by psychological denial as well as a lack of knowledge and familiarity with Alzheimer’s, up close and face to face. I should have been alerted because she had never gotten over the fact that her mother put her father in the rest home after he went and got a rifle to her and her mother fell and injured her foot and couldn’t keep up with him.

    But I was not there, though I visited him with her briefly in the rest home, but he always had a quiet and retiring disposition, a man of very few words, and I had no idea of the difficulties a demented elder can present, how unmanageable some can be, and how to relate to them and manage their behavior.
    But by 2011, it was clear that something was wrong with Dr. J, despite her trying to hide it, and such a good actor at that. Her mother didn’t know that and drove her to play the piano, but her talent was more in her voice box and her being than her fingers. Plus, she had always relied on me for information, seeing me as a fountainhead of knowledge (she said she thought I was a “genius”). So I continued to play the role, but she wound up in confinement, with me duped by the medical establishment and conventional wisdom and custom.

    First it was 72 hours for her safety and mine, then it’s two weeks for hers when I opt out, then a month. They told me I’d have to have a “power of attorney” to make any decisions over her niece and them, but by then I had seen how oppressive involuntary confinement was to her: involuntary because most people will stay and just be bored and lonely, because after a while people don’t visit that much. Sometimes I would leave the office for visiting hours and be the only one there visiting anybody in the “Acute Psychiatric Ward,” for they have a mixture, which is demoralizing in itself to be in a place of the openly and acutely insane – like how did I come to this? – and people bellowing and moaning, sometimes in a different language, so you don’t know what they’re saying they will do to you, all day long. One night the house psychiatrist came out unsolicited by me and opined that I shouldn’t visit so often, but I paid her no mind.

    And yet, I admired how the staff could handle her, though she was the hardest patient of all for them to handle in a locked up condition. They liked her nevertheless and brought in a portable piano and allowed her to to entertain the other inmates anytime she wanted to. One night in casual conversation with me, she referred to her situation as “incarceration.” I knew for a fact she had never read Psychiatrist Thomas Ssazz, though I had, but even I hadn’t read his “The Medicalizaton of Everyday Life,” in which he independently called involuntary confinement of patients “incarceration.”

    Each night when the visiting hour was over, I would have to conspire with the staff to distract her while I sneaked out the door without her; but, by the time I would hear the ominous prison-like click of the closing of the door, the nonchalant staff would have turned her loose and I would hear her sorrowfully knocking on the door and desperately calling out my name to help her, like Maria calling Roberto at the end of “For Whom the Bells Toll.”

    I thought of the marital vows when I had stood with my hand on a Bible and promised to love her and protect her until death do us part. I also wondered and imagined what she would have done if they would lock me up against my will for medical treatment of a condition they admit they can’t cure or rightly treat and don’t really even know what causes it.

    What would she have done if I was the one on the other side of the door of sanity in an insane world, where the most powerful man in existence is collectively described as mentally ill by thirty top psychiatrists and such. I recalled how she would sometimes say in other random but serious circumstances and idle speculation: “If anybody ever bothers you [or do harm in any way], no telling what I would do; I will tear up this town.”

    The next morning I woke up early from a largely sleepless night and called some of the San Francisco State College BSU leaders from the 1960s Black and Ethnic Studies Strike: including a physician who consults worldwide on Alzheimer’s, a retired judge, a retired lawyer or two, a community organizer in San Francisco and another visiting from the East Coast, and went out and brought her home.

    That was almost six years ago, when she was diagnosed in the late moderate stage. However, my collaborators had noted and remarked on Julia’s visible improvement after an hour of freedom. But later she would develop a bed sore and go through hospice, at home under a visiting clinic, indeed two, as the one who refused before now wanted to come in under new Medicare guidelines from Obamacare. They brought in the death apparatus and stored it in the apartment in full anticipation. A physician sat for at least twenty minutes explaining to me why the bedsore wouldn’t heal, but it did, though I do believe that if Julia had been confined again she would have died, literally, under categorizing and caring staff prescript.

    Mind you, they’re good in what they do, they just need to do it in the home and community.. We have the technology to do so: computers, internet and social networks, cars. S.U,B’s, bicycles, scooters, cellphones with cameras in the back while pointed at you. It would be cheaper as well, for people in their home are already paying rent.

    In any event, I did what I had to do: stand by my wife who had stood by me; but more than that, it just seems there is something wrong with incarcerating a proud and dignified lady in the final stage of her life cycle, against her will, don’t care if she has never had so much as a parking ticket in her life.
    Mental Health Is Tied to Social Health

    I have learned on a deeper level that mental health is tied to social health, and I am gratified and impressed by the way people are getting behind the movement to deal with the Alzheimer’s epidemic and coming pandemic. I liked it when Barack Obama called for a cure by 2025, and it looks to me if interest keeps mounting as it has in recent years, we will meet that goal; but though it would be a blessing to so many others, it won’t do Julia any good or mend a broken heart.

    I want to acknowledge that I could not have stood by Julia in her present ordeal, if so many people hadn’t stood by me, or the few hadn’t stood by me so well. While it is true, and has been said, that most people, especially the ones you’d most expect, will not lift a finger to help a flea, I have been amazed by the quality and the quantity of help and the quantity of the quality of help Julia and I have received from too many to mention. I must find a way some day to thank them in a circumstance that might prevent leaving somebody out.

    When I jumped out with promises and parachutes that didn’t open or got snagged, I didn’t know where to go or what to do. I was so ignorant of Alzheimer’s it’s a shame. Partly because people had been prone to hide the demented in the closet, so to speak, or put them away altogether, lock them away if necessary.
    I often stand and look back now and realize how many people I encountered in the past who had Alzheimer’s and I didn’t know it: we just lumped them in the loose category of “senile,” a net big enough to encompass almost anybody elderly individual. Two things people think about an old person they meet: they are senile and got some money or something of value under the mattress or somewhere, and the young person is going to try to get it if they can; not that they necessarily need it, just so they can get it and have it.
    As for Julia, I regret to say that at this point she is going down slow, fast. She is doing well in her physical health and emotionally but Alzheimer’s is a progressively deteriorating disease, and you can see her going down in a cognitive way, something like month by month.

    She has lost much of her ability to speak and function by now, but I can tell that she knows more than she can say.

    People ask me if she still remembers me, if she knows who I am, and I am compelled to quibble, but I say yes, on her current level, she has forgotten much of the old me but she knows me as she knows me now, and of course what is more important, is I know who she is.

    She still knows herself well enough to answer to her name, if you are trying to get her attention, though you can usually get her attention without calling her name, say by simply using the remote to raise or modulate the volume on the cablevision, or by playing her one of her favorite songs on the computer, something I do for an hour or two on many an evening after the sun goes down, and you can tell she is exceedingly gratified, just to have the attention but she will use her hand to direct the music in the air. When we were 24 years old and I was teaching for a year at Virginia State College in Petersburg, Virginia, she was the Minister of Music, including choir director, for the oldest black Baptist church in America, the Harrison Street First Baptist Church, which still exists. At one point, needing more male voices, she even recruited me to sing in the choir and once gave me a solo part to sing. I just acted like I was in the shower.

    So I know there will inevitably come a time when she will have forgotten me altogether without a doubt, but I will remember her: that she sometimes gave me a hard time in good times but always stood by me in times of trouble, always took my side.

    She continues to live at home with Alzheimer’s and find exquisite enjoyment in the instrumental music on 24/7 cablevision, as she was a pianist by background and training and by temperament a dramatist but became a scholar primarily as my longest and most continual student. Though going down slow these days in a cognitive sense, she is doing well physically and emotionally, enjoying interacting with her caregivers and me and the special attention I try to give her because maybe I didn’t always love her quite as often as I could have when times were good, little things I should have said and done but didn’t take the time. So I just try to fill her life with whatever joy I can and always love her all the time.

    So, even when it comes to the point that she no longer remembers me, I will remember her, and I will recall that she was unforgettable and thought I was unforgettable too.


    photo Johnnie Burrell

    The San Francisco Bay Area humbly celebrated, in a private ceremony, the 85th B Day of our most esteemed scholar and African healer, Dr. Nathan Hare, father of Black and Ethnic Studies, the intellectual warrior who has been Black, or rather White listed, and confined to house arrest over half a century for simply thinking black, loving black and sacrificing his life for black in the world of white supremacy and multiculturalism that his wife, Dr. Julia Hare said, "Multiculturalism is but another term for failed integration." 

    I say, "If multiculturalism is so great, why are we yet on the bottom rung of the multicultural ladder?" Further, what are we bringing to the multicultural table? The Latinos come with their agenda, Asians with theirs, whites with theirs, LGBT with theirs, so what is our agenda? A job, job, job? Whites are seizing land and property, Latinos, Asians, LGBT the same, so what is our priority agenda item beyond a motherfuckin, goddamn punk ass job that was described by one of our elders as an indirect welfare handout called JOB?

    Meanwhile, we are gentrified into tents and out of town, state and country, yes, have you heard of Blaxit, the current move of North American Africans to Ghana? But with the recent US military agreement with Ghana, how can we be sure Ghana is the panacea for the psycho-social issues of North American Africans or even Continental Africans? 

    Furthermore, we are told North American Africans are the cause of gentrification in Ghana! So we cannot be sure if and when tribalism resurfaces as it did in South Africa with Zimbabwean refugees, also in Guyana, South America, when North American Africans got jobs in key government ministries that caused jealousy and envy among the native population, especially when the opposition leader married a North American African woman. 

    Minister Farrakhan said, "No matter where I traveled throughout the world, whether Christian, Muslim, Jewish, Communist, Socialist or Capitalist country, the black man and woman were on the bottom!" 

    I say check out America: blacks fill the jails, go to Israel, Africans fill the jails. Go to Brazil, a black woman politician was recently assassinated fighting for African Brazilian human rights. 

    Oakland Poet Paradise Jah Love's poem is a classic, "They Love Everything About Me But Me!" 

    They can call each other nigga around the world in hip hop culture but still hate niggas. And for sure, niggas still hate niggas, yet denounce the N word even though it is a billion dollar word we should capitalize on instead protest its usage. If we had a billion dollar word, wouldn't it be common sense for us to take advantage of it instead of protesting? 

    With Black Panther, we have a billion dollar film, whether we got pimped as per usual, or totally agree with it or not,but shouldn't we want to examine how we as Africans and North American Africans can benefit from its success, even if we don't like it, including the fact that the only  North American Africans in the film were villains, a black man and woman, despite the overwhelming historical fact that Africans sold us to the Europeans and both Africans and Europeans enjoyed 400 years of surplus capital from the slave trade, minus the cost of human labor.  Thus, North American Africans have nothing to feel guilty about. For sure, we resisted and protested every day of our 400 year trauma, grief and genocide. See Negro Slave Revolts by Melville Herskovitts. See the Historical Channel's Slave Catchers and Resisters, the best documentary of African resistance to the American Slave System (Ed Howard term).

    A segment of North American Africans identify with the socalled villain Killmonger, especially when he said before his death at the hands of the Wakandan's, "My ancestors are those who jumped off the slave ships rather than be victims of the eternal slave system in the Americas."
    The Qur'an says, "Persecution is worse than slaughter." So many of us conscious North Americans departed the cinemas shouting Killmonger for Life!" Yes, no matter a majority of Africans, North American Africans and Africans in the Diaspora saluted the mythical kingdom of Wakanda in their romantic notion of the African kings and queens who benefited in their enslavement, just as the low information vibration celebrate the Obamas even though they were globalists and imperialists in black face, no different from the plethora black face neo-colonial African leaders on the continent and throughout the Pan African Diaspora.

    Rainbow flag Racism and White Supremacy



    Long ago,  the LBGT community informed me the rainbow flag does not represent them, that it is but another symbol of racism and white supremacy. Joe Hawkine s, founder of the Oakland LGBT Center has partnered with our forthcoming Teach-In and Testimonial: Racism and White Supremacy in the Bay Area. FYI, a brother traveled to Peru and told me the LGBT was stolen from Peru. White supremacists, no matter what gender, religion or political persuasion are still white supremacists and we suspect they, in the words of Mao, will never put down their butcher knives and turn into Buddha heads, unless they agree to go into long term recovery to address their severe condition of addiction to white supremacy.

    As a straight man, after over a half century in the Black Arts Movement and the BAM coast to coast, I have "had no choice but to appreciate the genius and extraordinarily talent of artists beyond the socially acceptable heterosexual gender. Gay brothers have portrayed my son who was a straight man. Lesbian women have portrayed straight women in my dramas. Alas, if you are an actor, for sure, you must adapt, understand all personas in the human and sexual spectrum. Alas, as a writer, I must comprehend and appreciate the human dilemma no matter what sexual orientation. If I can't, it would be wise for me to give up the art of writing!

    Yes, Dr. Nathan Hare was/is too black for the pseudo black conscious intellectuals in perpetual crisis (see Harold Cruse, Crisis of the Negro Intellectual) and academic negroes, including the Kemetic, Pan African Youtube scholars of today that he says live in the Kingdom of Afrikanna or shall we say Wakanda, the mythical kingdom of make believe, best described Sociologist Dr. E. Franklin Frazier in his classic Black Bourgeoisie. 

    but especially those tenured niggas who obtained neo-colonial elite jobs for life from their vampiric sucking of his black intellectual and edrevolutionary blood. Dr. Nathan Hare shares the honored tradition of intellectual resistance fighters from David Walker, Henry Highland Garnett, W.E.B. DuBois, Paul Robeson, et al, including women like Harriett Tubman, 

    Saturday, March 31, 2018




    Marvin X and his Master Teacher, Dr. Nathan Hare, father of Black and Ethnic Studies. He holds PhDs in Sociology and Clinical Psychology, founder of Black Scholar Magazine. Black academia, i.e., Howard University, and white academia, San Francisco State University, kicked him out because of his unapologetic Black revolutionary consciousness. He and his wife, Julia, were a formidable couple who preached Black Power/Black Love. A London, England newspaper called Julia the female Malcolm X! See her speech at Tavis Smiley's State of the Black Nation, Youtube. See below Dr. Nathan Hare's Love Song to Julia: "She Stood By Me" that appeared in The Movement Newspaper, published by Marvin X. Nathan is Senior Writer. 


    After spending 45 minutes stalled in traffic before we got to the San Francisco Bay Bridge toll gate and another 20 or 30 minutes at the light before the bridge, (an effort we pray never to repeat, which may mean we will never drive a car to San Francisco) we made it to San Francisco to the Russian Hill apartment building Drs. Julia and Nathan Hare have occupied since 1973. Only rent control saves them from the gentrified high rent prices. As I entered, our beloved African Queen Dr. Julia Hare was being taken from the living room to the bedroom. Apparently she had fallen asleep. Alzheimers has taken its toll on her but she came back from hospice a few years ago and has been under the tender loving care of her husband of sixty plus years. Many of us can't stay married sixty days!

    This afternoon Dr. Nathan Hare celebrated his 85th B day early at his home with friends and relatives  who discovered him through DNA. Two relatives flew into San Francisco from Chicago and Florida. He was happy and honored his DNA relatives came to town. He said to me that other blood relatives never come or call! Such is the state of the loving black family. 

     
    photo Johnnie Burrell

    As you see in the pic above, women were the majority in attendance, but most were women of power and authority. One said she was the only Black on her block of Divisadero Street. A life long San Francisco resident, in her retirement as an educator, she has traveled the world. She was present at my 2004 SF Tenderloin Black Radical Book Fair and wanted to know when I was going to do another. I told her it takes grant funds but I'm not in the begging mood these days. 

    Besides her, there were several San Francisco "Negroes" present. My own San Francisco days go back to 1964 when I enrolled at San Francisco State Collegey, now University, and even before, 1963, when I was a researcher at UC Berkeley's School of Criminology under the famed Chicago Sociologist Dean Lohman. I was still enrolled at Oakland's Merritt College, along with my comrades Huey P. Newton, Bobby Seale, and a host of other Black Nationalists under the influence of the African American Association, headed by Attorney Donald Warden, aka, Khalid Abdullah Tariq Al Mansour, including the Los Angeles representative of the AAA, Ron Karenga, who, I was informed, got the Kwanza from Oakland's AAA, that also inspired the Black Panther Party and the West Coast or Northern California Black Arts Movement.

    One was a low income housing advocate  who is part of a non-profit that has 35 buildings in San Francisco with subsidized housing available now. Another sister was a retired SF Police Officer (and she let me know that when people see her with her natural, they know what's she's about), but more importantly, she informed me she is in a group of women with disabilities who lost their homes after working to achieve the American dream of home ownership. She said many of her comrades are homeless and living on the street after not being able to maintain home ownership. Furthermore, she is a descendant of the first North American African who owned a barber shop in San Francisco and was the first Black bail bondsman in California. She wants to know why there is no historical monument or any mention to her ancestor. She said former Mayor Willie Brown could help her but hasn't. I told her to contact Mayor Willie Brown's best friend, Bentley  driving Charlie Walker, de facto Mayor of Hunters Point. 
    Nothing happens in Hunters Point that Charlie doesn't know about. When youth are killed by each other or the police, families come to Charlie Walker for burial expenses. He once told me, "Marvin, I will help my people but these young brothers can't come in my house with pants hanging off their behinds. I have extra belts for them!"

    Food was catered and there was so much left over, I took home enough for Easter dinner, including fried chicken, baked chicken, turkey, dressing, greens, Mac and cheese, cheesecake, banana pudding, peach cobbler. 



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    Dr. Nathan Hare, first Chair of Black Studies on a major college 
    campus at San Francisco State College/University,
    Sociologist and Clinical Psychologist.  Dr. Nathan Hare 
    and his student/associate Marvin X. Marvin X was part of
    the initial visionary students at SFSU. He was a TA in the
    English/Creative Writing Department, later taught in Black Studies
    and Radio/TV Writing in the Broadcasting Department.

    Marvin X and Actor/activist Danny Glover were fellow students at SFSU. Danny also performed at
    Marvin X's Black Arts West Theatre, Fillmore District, San Francisco, 1966.

    After a lunch meeting with San Francisco State University former student leaders in the struggle for human rights that led to the longest student strike in American academic history, 1968, Marvin X agreed to write the long awaited untold story. Former student leaders Bernard Stringer, the first to graduate with a degree in Black Studies and Black Students/Third World Strike leader, Benny Stewart, said Marvin was chosen not only for his writing ability but because he is an alumni of San Francisco State College/University, 1964-66, 1972-74, B.A., M.A. English/Creative Writer. As a student, he was part of the transition of the Negro Students Association into the Black Students Union that eventually led to the Black and Third World Strike for the establishment of Black and Ethnic Studies, the first on the campus of a major American university.

    The Untold Story is a long awaited project of the SFSU/BSU leaders and strikers. Part of the delay has been due to an attempt to keep the mission of Black Students hidden after the Tenured Negroes or Neo-colonial elite took power in conspiracy with their academic masters, resulting in the critical concept of Black Studies connected with the Black Community being eliminated. At San Francisco State University the radical faculty was removed, most importantly,  the first Chair of Black and Ethnic Studies, Dr. Nathan Hare who possessed a PhD in Sociology and today a PhD in Clinical Psychology, acquired after he was white-listed from American academia because of his radical Black consciousness.

    Marvin X says the Untold Story is an awesome task because while the focus will be on the student struggle at San Francisco State University, it cannot be disconnected from the National Black Liberation Movement, the Black Arts Movement, the Black Panther Party and other cultural formations such as the US organization, which grew out of the Oakland African American Association founded by Attorneys Donald Warden, Donald Hopkins, activist Paul Cobb, entrepreneur Ed Howard, et al.

    Much of the research has been done by Bernard Stringer, strike leader, body guard of Dr. Nathan Hare, and, again, the first student to receive a degree in Black Studies at SFSU. Bernard has many archival materials from the SFSU Black student struggle. Marvin X also has the archives of Dr. Nathan Hare who was the focus of the strike for Black and Ethnic Studies that caused the SFPD to violently attempt to crush the strike, at the invitation of SFSU President S.I. Hayakawa, a Semanticist described by Muslim linguist Aaron Ali as, "An oriental with an occidental mind!"

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    Paul Robeson, Artistic Freedom Fighter


    Robeson's remembered with record and Row R

    NORMAN (OTIS) RICHMOND aka Jalali
    “Robeson may have joined the ancestors but his example, his intelligence, his political acumen remains as a lodestar we would all do well to study--and exemplify”. Gerald Horne

    One of Dr. Gerald Horne’s latest volume is Paul Robeson: The Artist as Revolutionary. I recently walked into the Parkdale Library in Toronto and saw a huge poster celebrating the great Robeson.  
    Robeson, actor, athlete, political activist and one of the greatest singers of all time, would have been 120 years old today. Thousands of words have been written about Robeson's interpretation of Jerome Kern's song, Old Man River, but little has been mentioned about his participation in a unique musical collaboration.

    In 1941, Robeson joined forces with Count Basie, Richard Wright, Jimmy Rushing and John Hammond to record a song about the legendary Brown Bomber - Joe Louis. The lyrics of the song, King Joe, were written by Wright, the African-American novelist who wrote a book called Black Power in 1954. Hammond, who produced Bessie Smith and Bob Dylan, directed the session. Count Basie and his orchestra provided the music, and Robeson, who was singing the blues for the first time in his life, had blues shouter Jimmy Rushing stand by his side to beat time. Mr. Five by Five as Rushing was known was there to keep Robeson’s on the ONE.

    Basie, who is was holding court at the Imperial Room in Toronto's Royal York Hotel, explained how he came to work with Robeson. "We were in a club in New York City. I was talking to John Hammond, and Paul (Robeson) was in the same club dancing. I told John, 'You know, I'd like to do a record with Paul.' John said, 'Why don't you ask him?' I said, 'Oh no, you ask him.' John asked him and Paul said, 'Gee whiz, I'd like nothing better.' We did it and, boy, it was a pleasure for me to do the record with him. For me, it's an item."

    Robeson's whole life was an item. It has been argued that Robeson, who died in Philadelphia in 1976 at the age of 77, might have been elected president of the United States if he hadn't been of African ancestry and if he had named the United States, not the Soviet Union, as the centre of world freedom.

    It may sound far-fetched, but Robeson was qualified for the job at the White House. Besides possessing one of the world's best bass voices and great athletic skill, Robeson was also a talented lawyer and debater. He had the looks of Harry Belafonte and the charisma of the Kennedy brothers.
    For 30 years - from the First World War until after the Second World War - Robeson's extraordinary achievements kept him in the spotlight. First, he won national fame as a football superstar - the fabulous "Robeson of Rutgers," an all-time All-American. Robeson was the third black to enroll at Rutgers University.

    On graduation, he entered Columbia University Law School, paying his expenses by playing professional football. Realizing there was little future in those days for a black lawyer, he made the stage and concert singing his career. He gained international renown as a concert singer and actor in starring roles on stage and screen.

    But the limelight was suddenly switched off. Robeson shocked the American establishment with his advocacy of the rights of African- Americans and his praise for the Soviet Union. His constant involvement in human rights causes and left-wing movements led to his being branded a Communist. His passport was revoked by the U.S. State Department in 1950; he didn't get it back until 1958. But the boycott of Robeson by the American establishment went further: all doors to stage, screen, concert hall, radio, TV, and recording studios were locked to him. Robeson saw his income plummet from $100,000 in 1947 to approximately $6,000 by 1952. 

    Despite the problems at home, Robeson's star continued to shine internationally. African-American scholar W. E. B. DuBois, himself a victim of the anti-Communist witch hunt, said in a speech to a Harlem audience at the time: "Paul Robeson is without doubt today, as a person, the best known American on earth, to the largest number of human beings. His voice is known in Europe, Asia and Africa, in the West Indies and South America and in the islands of the seas. Children on the streets of Peking and Moscow, Calcutta and Jakarta greet him and send him their love. Only in his native land is he without honor and rights."

    Robeson was also known and loved in Canada. His first Toronto appearance was in November, 1929. In 1942, a Toronto critic described Robeson as "the world's greatest basso since Chaliapin." On Sept. 25, 1944, he opened in Othello at the Royal Alexandra Theatre with Uta Hagen playing Desdemona and Jose Ferrer as Iago. Later appearances by Robeson in Toronto were often accompanied by controversy. In a 1946 Massey Hall appearance, he spent half his time speaking about the plight of black people and the other half singing. That July, he joined striking Chrysler workers on the picket line in Windsor. He urged them to persist until their demands were met and soothed the strikers with his bass voice. But this was not out of character for Robeson. "The hand of brotherhood - yes, I found that hand in Canada" - Robeson wrote that tribute to Canadians in the mid-fifties.

    Robeson found brotherhood in Canada even after his death. A group of Torontonians and others endowed a whole row of 60 Roy Thomson Hall seats in his memory. Black stars Harry Belafonte, Lena Horne, James Earl Jones and British politician Anthony Benn were among the project's sponsors.

    The campaign to raise $60,000 to contribute all the Row R seats in Robeson's name was spearheaded by social worker Leslie Webber, a long-time fan. Toronto photographer Sylvia Schwartz, psychiatrist Granville da Costa, nurse Elizabeth Plummer and the late Hazel Forbes, a one-time publicity director for the O'Keefe Centre, also served on the Row R Committee.

    The project was so successful that, according to Marilyn Michener of Roy Thomson Hall, "we had to go into Row P as well." Black Theatre Canada and Third World Books and Crafts were among the organizations and people who put up $1,000 for a seat. The late Leonard Johnston, co-owner of the Third World bookstore, explained why his seat inscription read Third World and not his family name. "Paul Robeson spoke for the oppressed people of the world, most of whom are in the Third World. I think it's important that they honor him and not me as an individual."

    Bio

    Norman (OtisRichmond, aka Jalali, produces Diasporic Music a radio show for https://blackpower96.org/   and writes a column, Diasporic Music for the Burning Spear Newspaper monthly.

    Jalali was born on March 6th the same day as Ghana’s independence.  He grew up in Los Angeles. He left Los Angles after refusing to fight in Vietnam because he felt that, like the Vietnamese, Africans in the United States were colonial subjects.

    After leaving Los Angeles in the 1960s Richmond moved to Toronto, where he co-founded the Afro American Progressive Association, one of the first Black Power organizations in that part of the world. Before moving to Toronto permanently, Richmond worked with the Detroit-based League of Revolutionary Black Workers. He was the youngest member of the central staff. When the League split he joined the African People’s Party.


    In 1992, Richmond received the Toronto Arts Award. In front of an audience that included the mayor of Toronto, Richmond dedicated his award to Mumia Abu-Jamal, Assata Shakur, Geronimo Pratt, the African National Congress of South Africa, and Fidel Castro and the people of Cuba.

    In 1984 he co-founded the Toronto Chapter of the Black Music Association with Milton Blake. Richmond began his career in journalism at the African Canadian weekly Contrast. He went on to be published in the Toronto Star, the  Toronto Globe & Mail, the  National Post, the Jackson Advocate,  Share, the Islander, the Black American, Pan African News Wire, and Black Agenda Report. San Francisco Bay View.

    Internationally he has written for the United Nations, the Jamaican Gleaner, the Nation (Barbados) the Nation (Sri Lanka, and Pambazuka News. Currently, he produces Diasporic Music a radio show for Uhuru Radio and writes a column, Diasporic Music for the Burning Spear Newspaper.


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    Spread of Wahhabism was done at request of West during Cold War – Saudi crown prince


    The Saudi-funded spread of Wahhabism began as a result of Western countries asking Riyadh to help counter the Soviet Union during the Cold War, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman told the Washington Post.
    Speaking to the paper, bin Salman said that Saudi Arabia's Western allies urged the country to invest in mosques and madrassas overseas during the Cold War, in an effort to prevent encroachment in Muslim countries by the Soviet Union.
    He added that successive Saudi governments had lost track of that effort, saying "we have to get it all back." Bin Salman also said that funding now comes mostly from Saudi-based "foundations," rather than from the government.
    The crown prince’s 75-minute interview with the Washington Post took place on March 22. Another topic of discussion included a previous claim by US media that bin Salman had said that he had White House senior adviser Jared Kushner "in his pocket."
    Bin Salman denied reports that when he and Kushner – who is also Donald Trump's son-in-law – met in Riyadh in October, he had sought or received a greenlight from Kushner for the massive crackdown on alleged corruption which led to widespread arrests in the kingdom shortly afterwards. According to bin Salman, the arrests were a domestic issue and had been in the works for years.
    He said it would be "really insane" for him to trade classified information with Kushner, or to try to use him to advance Saudi interests within the Trump administration. He stated that their relationship was within a normal governmental context, but did acknowledge that he and Kushner "work together as friends, more than partners."He stated that he also had good relationships with Vice President Mike Pence and others within the White House.
    The crown prince also spoke about the war in Yemen, where a Saudi-led coalition continues to launch a bombing campaign against Houthi rebels in an attempt to reinstate ousted Abdrabbuh Mansur Hadi as president. The conflict has killed thousands, displaced many more, driven the country to the brink of famine, and led to a major cholera outbreak.
    Although the coalition has been accused of a large number of civilian deaths and disregard for civilian lives - an accusation which Riyadh denies - the crown prince said his country has not passed up "any opportunity" to improve the humanitarian situation in the country. “There are not good options and bad options. The options are between bad and worse,” he said.
    The interview with the crown prince was initially held off the record. However, the Saudi embassy later agreed to led the Washington Post publish specific portions of the meeting.

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    Richest 1% on target to own two-thirds of all wealth by 2030

    World leaders urged to act as anger over inequality reaches a ‘tipping point’

    The world’s richest 1% are on course to control as much as two-thirds of the world’s wealth by 2030, according to a shocking analysis that has lead to a cross-party call for action.
    World leaders are being warned that the continued accumulation of wealth at the top will fuel growing distrust and anger over the coming decade unless action is taken to restore the balance.
    An alarming projection produced by the House of Commons library suggests that if trends seen since the 2008 financial crash were to continue, then the top 1% will hold 64% of the world’s wealth by 2030. Even taking the financial crash into account, and measuring their assets over a longer period, they would still hold more than half of all wealth.
    Since 2008, the wealth of the richest 1% has been growing at an average of 6% a year – much faster than the 3% growth in wealth of the remaining 99% of the world’s population. Should that continue, the top 1% would hold wealth equating to $305tn (£216.5tn) – up from $140tn today.
    Analysts suggest wealth has become concentrated at the top because of recent income inequality, higher rates of saving among the wealthy, and the accumulation of assets. The wealthy also invested a large amount of equity in businesses, stocks and other financial assets, which have handed them disproportionate benefits.
    New polling by Opinium suggests that voters perceive a major problem with the influence exerted by the very wealthy. Asked to select a group that would have the most power in 2030, most (34%) said the super-rich, while 28% opted for national governments. In a sign of falling levels of trust, those surveyed said they feared the consequences of wealth inequality would be rising levels of corruption (41%) or the “super-rich enjoying unfair influence on government policy” (43%).
    The research was commissioned by Liam Byrne, the former Labour cabinet minister, as part of a gathering of MPs, academics, business leaders, trade unions and civil society leaders focused on addressing the problem.
    Actor Michael Sheen, who is campaigning against high-interest lenders, supports the calls to rebalance global inequality.
     Actor Michael Sheen, who is campaigning against high-interest lenders, supports the calls to rebalance global inequality. Photograph: Teri Pengilley for the Guardian
    The actor Michael Sheen, who has opted to scale back his Hollywood career to campaign against high-interest credit providers, was among those supporting the calls.
    The hope is to create pressure for global action when leaders of the G20 group of nations gather for a summit in Buenos Aires in November. Byrne, who organised the first OECD global parliamentary conference on inclusive growth, said he believed global inequality was “now at a tipping point”.
    “If we don’t take steps to rewrite the rules of how our economies work, then we condemn ourselves to a future that remains unequal for good,” he said. “That’s morally bad, and economically disastrous, risking a new explosion in instability, corruption and poverty.”
    In a sign of the concern about the accumulation of wealth in the hands of so few, the move has gained support from across the political divide.
    George Freeman, the Tory MP and former head of the prime minister’s policy board, said: “While mankind has never seen such income inequality, it is also true that mankind has never experienced such rapid increases in living standards. Around the world billions of people are being lifted out of poverty at a pace never seen before. But the extraordinary concentration of global wealth today – fuelled by the pace of technological innovation and globalisation – poses serious challenges.
    “If the system of capitalist liberal democracy which has triumphed in the west is to pass the big test of globalisation – and the assault from radical Islam as well as its own internal pressures from post-crash austerity – we need some new thinking on ways to widen opportunity, share ownership and philanthropy. Fast.”
    Demands for action from the group include improving productivity to ensure wages rise and reform of capital markets to promote greater equality.
    Danny Dorling, professor of geography at the University of Oxford, said the scenario in which the super-rich accumulated even more wealth by 2030 was a realistic one.
    “Even if the income of the wealthiest people in the world stops rising dramatically in the future, their wealth will still grow for some time,” he said. “The last peak of income inequality was in 1913. We are near that again, but even if we reduce inequality now it will continue to grow for one to two more decades.”

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    Older Americans Are Hooked On Vitamins Despite Scarce Evidence They Work
    californiahealthline.org
    About InsightInsight provides an in-depth look at health care issues in and affecting California.
    Have a story suggestion? Let us know.
    About This SeriesIn this series, “Treatment Overkill,” Kaiser Health News investigates the causes and consequences of medical overtreatment, both for patients and the health care system.
    When she was a young physician, Dr. Martha Gulati noticed that many of her mentors were prescribing vitamin E and folic acid to patients. Preliminary studies in the early 1990s had linked both supplements to a lower risk of heart disease.
    She urged her father to pop the pills as well: “Dad, you should be on these vitamins, because every cardiologist is taking them or putting their patients on [them],” recalled Gulati, now chief of cardiology for the University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix.
    But just a few years later, she found herself reversing course, after rigorous clinical trials found neither vitamin E nor folic acid supplements did anything to protect the heart. Even worse, studies linked high-dose vitamin E to a higher risk of heart failureprostate cancer and death from any cause.
    “‘You might want to stop taking [these],’” Gulati told her father.
    More than half of Americans take vitamin supplements, including 68 percent of those age 65 and older, according to a 2013 Gallup poll. Among older adults, 29 percent take four or more supplements of any kind, according to a Journal of Nutrition study published in 2017.
    Often, preliminary studies fuel irrational exuberance about a promising dietary supplement, leading millions of people to buy in to the trend. Many never stop. They continue even though more rigorous studies — which can take many years to complete — almost never find that vitamins prevent disease, and in some cases cause harm.
    “The enthusiasm does tend to outpace the evidence,” said Dr. JoAnn Manson, chief of preventive medicine at Boston’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital.
    There’s no conclusive evidence that dietary supplements prevent chronic disease in the average American, Manson said. And while a handful of vitamin and mineral studies have had positive results, those findings haven’t been strong enough to recommend supplements to the general U.S. public, she said.
    The National Institutes of Health has spent more than $2.4 billion since 1999 studying vitamins and minerals. Yet for “all the research we’ve done, we don’t have much to show for it,” said Dr. Barnett Kramer, director of cancer prevention at the National Cancer Institute.
    Email Sign-UpSubscribe to California Healthline’s free Daily Edition.
    In Search Of The Magic Bullet
    A big part of the problem, Kramer said, could be that much nutrition research has been based on faulty assumptions, including the notion that people need more vitamins and minerals than a typical diet provides; that megadoses are always safe; and that scientists can boil down the benefits of vegetables like broccoli into a daily pill.
    Vitamin-rich foods can cure diseases related to vitamin deficiency. Oranges and limes were famously shown to prevent scurvy in vitamin-deprived 18th-century sailors. And research has long shown that populations that eat a lot of fruits and vegetables tend to be healthier than others.
    But when researchers tried to deliver the key ingredients of a healthy diet in a capsule, Kramer said, those efforts nearly always failed.
    (Story continues below.)
    It’s possible that the chemicals in the fruits and vegetables on your plate work together in ways that scientists don’t fully understand — and which can’t be replicated in a tablet, said Marjorie McCullough, strategic director of nutritional epidemiology for the American Cancer Society.
    More important, perhaps, is that most Americans get plenty of the essentials, anyway. Although the Western diet has a lot of problems — too much sodium, sugar, saturated fat and calories, in general — it’s not short on vitamins, said Alice Lichtenstein, a professor at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University.
    And although there are more than 90,000 dietary supplements from which to choose, federal health agencies and advisers still recommend that Americans meet their nutritional needs with food, especially fruits and vegetables.
    Also, American food is highly fortified — with vitamin D in milk, iodine in salt, B vitamins in flour, even calcium in some brands of orange juice.
    Without even realizing it, someone who eats a typical lunch or breakfast “is essentially eating a multivitamin,” said journalist Catherine Price, author of “Vitamania: How Vitamins Revolutionized the Way We Think About Food.”
    That can make studying vitamins even more complicated, Price said. Researchers may have trouble finding a true control group, with no exposure to supplemental vitamins. If everyone in a study is consuming fortified food, vitamins may appear less effective.
    The body naturally regulates the levels of many nutrients, such as vitamin C and many B vitamins, Kramer said, by excreting what it doesn’t need in urine. He added: “It’s hard to avoid getting the full range of vitamins.”
    Not all experts agree. Dr. Walter Willett, a professor at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, says it’s reasonable to take a daily multivitamin “for insurance.” Willett said that clinical trials underestimate supplements’ true benefits because they aren’t long enough, often lasting five to 10 years. It could take decades to notice a lower rate of cancer or heart disease in vitamin takers, he said.
    Vitamin Users Start Out Healthier
    For Charlsa Bentley, 67, keeping up with the latest nutrition research can be frustrating. She stopped taking calcium, for example, after studies found it doesn’t protect against bone fractures. Additional studies suggest that calcium supplements increase the risk of kidney stones and heart disease.
    Charlsa Bentley takes five supplements a day. “It’s hard to know what’s effective and what’s not,” she says. (Courtesy of Charlsa Bentley)
    “I faithfully chewed those calcium supplements, and then a study said they didn’t do any good at all,” said Bentley, from Austin, Texas. “It’s hard to know what’s effective and what’s not.”
    Bentley still takes five supplements a day: a multivitamin to prevent dry eyes, magnesium to prevent cramps while exercising, red yeast rice to prevent diabetes, coenzyme Q10 for overall health and vitamin D based on her doctor’s recommendation.
    Like many people who take dietary supplements, Bentley also exercises regularly — playing tennis three to four times a week — and watches what she eats.
    People who take vitamins tend to be healthier, wealthier and better educated than those who don’t, Kramer said. They are probably less likely to succumb to heart disease or cancer, whether they take supplements or not. That can skew research results, making vitamin pills seem more effective than they really are.
    Faulty Assumptions
    Preliminary findings can also lead researchers to the wrong conclusions.
    For example, scientists have long observed that people with high levels of an amino acid called homocysteine are more likely to have heart attacks. Because folic acid can lower homocysteine levels, researchers once hoped that folic acid supplements would prevent heart attacks and strokes.
    In a series of clinical trials, folic acid pills lowered homocysteine levels but had no overall benefit for heart disease, Lichtenstein said.
    Studies of fish oil also may have led researchers astray.
    When studies of large populations showed that people who eat lots of seafood had fewer heart attacks, many assumed that the benefits came from the omega-3 fatty acids in fish oil, Lichtenstein said.
    Rigorous studies have failed to show that fish oil supplements prevent heart attacks. A clinical trial of fish oil pills and vitamin D, whose results are expected to be released within the year, may provide clearer questions about whether they prevent disease.
    But it’s possible the benefits of sardines and salmon have nothing to do with fish oil, Lichtenstein said. People who have fish for dinner may be healthier due to what they don’t eat, such as meatloaf and cheeseburgers.
    “Eating fish is probably a good thing, but we haven’t been able to show that taking fish oil [supplements] does anything for you,” said Dr. Steven Nissen, chairman of cardiovascular medicine at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation.
    (Story continues below.)
    Too Much Of A Good Thing?
    Taking megadoses of vitamins and minerals, using amounts that people could never consume through food alone, could be even more problematic.
    “There’s something appealing about taking a natural product, even if you’re taking it in a way that is totally unnatural,” Price said.
    Early studies, for example, suggested that beta carotene, a substance found in carrots, might help prevent cancer.
    In the tiny amounts provided by fruits and vegetables, beta carotene and similar substances appear to protect the body from a process called oxidation, which damages healthy cells, said Dr. Edgar Miller, a professor of medicine at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.
    Experts were shocked when two large, well-designed studies in the 1990s found that beta carotene pills actually increased lung cancer rates. Likewise, a clinical trial published in 2011 found that vitamin E, also an antioxidant, increased the risk of prostate cancer in men by 17 percent. Such studies reminded researchers that oxidation isn’t all bad; it helps kill bacteria and malignant cells, wiping them out before they can grow into tumors, Miller said.
    “Vitamins are not inert,” said Dr. Eric Klein, a prostate cancer expert at the Cleveland Clinic who led the vitamin E study. “They are biologically active agents. We have to think of them in the same way as drugs. If you take too high a dose of them, they cause side effects.”
    Gulati, the physician in Phoenix, said her early experience with recommending supplements to her father taught her to be more cautious. She said she’s waiting for the results of large studies — such as the trial of fish oil and vitamin D — to guide her advice on vitamins and supplements.
    “We should be responsible physicians,” she said, “and wait for the data.”
    This story was produced by Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent program of the Kaiser Family Foundation.

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    Cops eat raw black men

    For lunch. 


    Suck blood hearts

    These cannibals
    Claim civility
    Revel savagery
    Suck truth from Black boy heads
    Girls too are booty. 

    MX
    4/9/18
    Poem for AB

    Who has the most poison gas in dey ass
    US, Syria, Russia, Israel, who? 
    Who poots louder than Putin? Trumpian? Zionian? Saudi Arabian in Yemen? 
    Who burned alive SLA, Move people? 
    Who sends children to school with no protection? 
    Who interviews a nut 47 times but don't take him to nut house, who?
    Who drops guns in da hood like doodoo? 
    And who is doodoo
    Dry doodoo is the worst
    It flies gets in eyes
    Airborne worse than poison gas
    Ask SF Tenderloin children
    What doodoo do 
    On way to school.
    Who overdosed 99% with opioids? Big Pharma, Big China, Big Mexican Mafia, who? 
    Who told FB to sell yo cuzin's address to Obama, Hillary and Donald, who?
    Who made you ignut deaf dumb blind? 
    Who trampled truth under foot? 
    Who told you JC is coming back after 2018 years, who? 
    --Marvin X
    4/7/18


    AB and MX


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    Marvin X: A Critical Look






      
    marvin x, at oscar grant/frank ogawa plaza, oakland
    photo pendarvis harshaw

    Edited  by Nefertiti Jackmon 



    Dedication 


    My life and death are all for Allah. I believe in the teachings of the Most Honorable Elijah Muhammad. I believe in the teachings of Jelaluddin Balkhi, better known as Rumi. I believe in the teachings of Bawa Muhaiyadeen. Gain a knowledge of my teachers and you will understand me. If you reject my teachers, there is no need to proceed further.


    preface 

     
    Bismillah-r-Rahman-r-Rahim

    If it is true that I am the father of modern Islamic literature in America, as Dr. Mohja Kahf proclaims, I would like to delineate my lineage. As a spiritual descendant of West African Muslims, I begin my literary biography in the Mali Empire, among those scholar/poet/social activists of Timbuktu: Ahmed Baba, Muhammad El-Mrili, Ahmed Ibn Said, Muhammad Al Wangari, and the later Sufi poet/warriors of Senegal and Hausaland, Ahmedu Bamba and Uthman dan Fodio.

    In America, this literary tradition continued under the wretched conditions of slavery with the English/Arabic narratives of Ayub Suleimon Diallo, Ibrahima Abdulrahman Jallo, Bilali Mohammad, Salih Bilali, Umar Ibn Said and others who told how they got ovah, how they survived the worst terrorist regime in the history of mankind.  Their narratives are thus the origin of Muslim literature in America, an integral part of the beginning of American and African American literature in general. There is some suspicion that David Walker, Frederick Douglas, Booker T. Washington and Benjamin Baneker may have also been descendants of Muslims.

    Certainly they share the Islamic spirit of creative resistance (any means necessary), and we must acknowledge this spirit in the Islamic and Pan African writings of Edward Wilmot Blyden, the greatest African intellectual of the late 19th century. See his Islam, Christianity and the Negro Race, 1887. While Marcus Garvey was in London,1912, being taught  One God, One Aim, One Destiny, African For the Africans, Those At Home and Those Abroad, by his Egyptian Muslim mentor Duse Muhammad Ali, Noble Drew Ali,1913, established his Moorish Science Temple in Newark, New Jersey, later Chicago,  and created his Seven Circle Koran, a synthesis of Qur'anic, Masonic, mystical and esoteric writings.

    And most importantly, Master Fard Muhammad arrived in Detroit, 1930, to deliver his Supreme Wisdom, mythological Sufi teachings, to the Honorable Elijah Muhammad, later summarized in Elijah's primers of mystical Islamic theology and black nationalism, Message To The Black Man and The Theology of Time.

    The next major work is Malcolm X's 
    Autobiography , with the assistance of Alex Haley. This neo-slave narrative bridged ancient and modern Islamic literature in America. Let us also include Louis Farakhan's off Broadway drama Organa and his classic song A White Man's Heaven is The Black Man's Hell, anthem of the Black revolution of the 60s. Amiri Baraka utilized the Muslim myth of Yacub in his play A Black Mass, one of his most powerful works, an examination of the cloning of the white man, not such a fantastic idea today since the white man has begun cloning himself.
    Askia Muhammad Toure must be credited for his Islamic writings, along with poetess Sonia Sanchez  (Laila Mannan) who served a brief tenure in the Nation of Islam. Yusef Rahman and Yusef Iman created powerful Islamic poetry as well.

    Now we may safely proceed into an examination of "Marvin's World." Enter at your own risk.

    The following articles, essays, reviews and interviews give a good summary of Marvin X, aka El Muhajir, Nazzam Al Fitnah, Nazzam Al Sudan, Maalik El Muhajir, Marvin Ellis Jackmon.

    Kalamu ya Salaam called me the sledgehammer. Sister poet MC Melody said I am the human earthquake. Suzzette Celeste said I am a tsunami, but I am that I am, so let the critics have their say, after all, they may know more about me than I do. What do I know about myself? I'm just now figuring out who I am.

    As-Salaam-Alaikum
    El Muhajir (Marvin X)


    Foreword
     Dr. Mohja Kahf


     
    Marvin X: First Muslim American Poet
    Have spent the last few days (when not mourning with friends and family the passing of my family friend and mentor in Muslim feminism and Islamic work, Sharifa AlKhateeb, (may she dwell in Rahma), immersed in the work of Marvin X and amazed at his brilliance. This poet has been prolific since his first book of poems, Fly to Allah, (1969), right up to his most recent Love and War Poems (1995) and Land of My Daughters, 2005, not to mention his plays, which were produced (without royalties) in Black community theatres from the 1960s to the present, and essay collections such as In the Crazy House Called America, 2002, and Wish I Could Tell You The Truth, 2005.

    Marvin X was a prime shaper of the Black Arts Movement (1964-1970s) which is, among other things, the birthplace of modern Muslim American literature, and it begins with him. Well, Malik Shabazz and him. But while the Autobiography of Malcolm X is a touchstone of Muslim American culture, Marvin X and other Muslims in BAM were the emergence of a cultural expression  of  Black Power and Muslim thought inspired by Malcolm, who was, of course, ignited by the teachings and writings of the Honorable Elijah Muhammad. And that, taken all together, is what I see as the starting point of Muslim American literature. Then there are others, immigrant Muslims and white American Muslims and so forth, that follow.

    There are also antecedents, such as the letters of Africans enslaved in America. Maybe there is writing by Muslims in the Spanish and Portuguese era or earlier, but that requires archival research of a sort I am not going to be able to do. My interest is contemporary literature, and by literature I am more interested in poetry and fiction than memoir and non-fiction, although that is a flexible thing.

    I argue that it is time to call Muslim American literature a field, even though many of these writings can be and have been classified in other ways—studied under African American literature or to take the writings of immigrant Muslims, studied under South Asian ethnic literature or Arab American literature.

    With respect to Marvin X, I wonder why I am just now hearing about him—I read Malcolm when I was 12, I read Amiri Baraka and Sonia Sanchez and others from the BAM in college and graduate school—why is attention not given to his work in the same places I encountered these other authors? Declaring Muslim American literature as a field of study is valuable because recontextualizing it will add another layer of attention to his incredibly rich body of work.

    He deserves to be WAY better known than he is among Muslim Americans and generally, in the world of writing and the world at large. By we who are younger Muslim American poets, in particular, Marvin should be honored as our elder, one who is still kickin, still true to the word!

    Love and War Poems is wrenching and powerful, combining a powerful critique of America ("America downsizes like a cripple whore/won't retire/too greedy to sleep/too fat to rest") but also a critique of deadbeat dads and drug addicts (not sparing himself) and men who hate. "For the Men" is so Quranic poem it gave me chills with verses such as:

    for the men who honor wives
    and the men who abuse them
    for the men who win
    and the men who sin
    for the men who love God
    and the men who hate
    for the men who are brothers
    and the men who are beasts

    "O Men, listen to the wise," the poet pleads:

    there is no escape
    for the men of this world
    or the men of the next
    He is sexist as all get out, in the way that is common for men of his generation and his radicalism, but he is refreshingly aware of that and working on it. It's just that the work isn't done and if that offends you to see a man in process and still using the 'b' word, look out. Speaking of the easily offended, he warns in his introduction that "life is often profane and obscene, such as the present condition of African American people." If you want pure and holy, he says, read the Quran and the Bible, because Marvin is talking about "the low down dirty truth." For all that, the poetry of Marvin X is like prayer, beauty-full of reverence and honor for Truth. "It is. it is. it is."

    A poem to his daughter Muhammida is a sweet mix of parental love and pride and fatherly freak-out at her sexuality and independence, ending humbly with:

    peace Mu
    it's on you
    yo world
    sister-girl

    Other people don't get off so easy, including a certain "black joint chief of staff ass nigguh (kill 200,000 Muslims in Iraq)" in the sharply aimed poem "Free Me from My Freedom." (Mmm hmm, the 'n' word is all over the place in Marvin too.) Nature poem, wedding poem, depression poem, wake-up call poems, it's all here. Haiti, Rwanda, the Million Man March, Betsy Ross's maid, OJ, Rabin, Mumia Abu-Jamal, and other topics make it into this prophetically voiced collection of dissent poetry, so Islamic and so African American in its language and its themes, a book that will stand in its beauty long after the people mentioned in it pass. READ MARVIN X for RAMADAN!
    Mohja Kahf / Associate Professor / Dept. of English & Middle East & Islamic Studies, University of Arkansas-Fayetteville
    Contents




    Chapter One: A Literary Biography
    Lorenzo Thomas, Close Up and Personal
    Michael E. Idland, A Voice That Must Be Heard
    Lee Hubbard, Unplugged

    Chapter Two: Autobiography, Somethin Proper, 1998
    Dr. Nathan Hare, introduction to Somethin Proper
    Dr. Julius E. Thompson, A Most Significant Work
    Fahizah Alim, A Proper Response
    James G. Spady, Making An Inventory and Constructing Self
    Reginal Major, Trampling His Soul
    Dingane (Joe Goncalves), Journey of A Restless Mind
    Dr. James Smethurst, Marvin X and the Black Arts Movement

    Chapter Three: Drama, 1965--
    Michael E. Idland, Major Works and Themes
    Steven Winn, 'Day' A Searing Account of Addiction
    Dr. Nathan Hare, Letter to Marvin X
    Dennis Leroy Moore, Parable of the Man Who Was Crucified
    Lil Joe, Sexual Repression in Sergeant Santa

    Chapter Four: Essays, in the Crazy House Called America, 2002
    James W. Sweeney, foreword
    Suzzette Celeste, MSW, MPA, introduction
    Dr. Nathan Hare, In the Crazy House of the Negro
    Dr. Nathan Hare, Letter to Marvin X
    Junious Ricardo Stanton, A Healing Peek Into His Psyche
    La Vonda R. Staples and Brenda A. Sutton, A Yoruba Chief Holds Court
    Lil Joe, Like Malcolm X, Marvin X Is A Revolutionary Muslim
    John Woodford, Bittersweet Fruits of Wisdom
    Aeeshah and Kokomon Clottey, The Quality of Heart
    Brecht Forum, Existential Musing

    Chapter Five: Poetry, Fly To Allah, 1969, Love and War, 1995 and Land of My Daughters, 2005
    Johari Amini (Jewel C. Latimore), Fly To Allah


    Dr. Mohja Kahf, Love and War
    Rudolph Lewis, Using the Past Rather Than Glorifying
    Ishmael Reed, Overcoming With Faith and Will

    Chapter Six: Essays, Wish I Could Tell You The Truth, 2005
    Rudolph Lewis, Discourse by Exaggeration and Humor
    Lil Joe, The Evolution of Consciousness
    Dr. Nathan Hare, He's Really That Good
    Pam Pam, Wish I, interview
    Terry Collins, Wish I, interview



    Chronology of Marvin X (El Muhajir )


    1944 Born May 29, Fowler, CA to Owendell and Marian M. Jackmon, second child. Sits atop desk as father and mother publishes Fresno Voice, the Central Valley’s first black newspaper. Father was a Race man who served in WWI. He introduced Christian Science to wife who becomes a lifelong follower of Mary Baker Eddy. Mr. Jackmon remained a Methodist. Marvin attended Lincoln and Columbia elementary schools in Fresno. In Oakland where the family moved, he attended Prescott, McFeely and St. Patrick elementary schools, also Lowell Jr. High. Wrote in the children’s section of the Oakland Tribune.
    1962 Graduated with honors from Edison High School in Fresno. Classmate and girlfriend was poet/critic/professor Sherely A. Williams (now deceased). Marries Pat Smith, Catholic school girl, first son born, Marvin K. Attends Merritt College in Oakland where he meets Huey Newton, Bobby Seale, Ken Freeman and Ernie Allen. Introduced to Black Nationalism. Wins short story contest in college magazine, story published in SoulBook, revolutionary nationalist publication.
    1964 Second son born, Darrel, now deceased. Graduates with AA in sociology. Attends San Francisco State College.
    1965 At the request of novelist John Gardner, San Francisco State College drama department produced first play, Flowers for the Trashman. Called the best playwright to hit SF State by Kenneth Rexroth. Worked as TA for novelist Leo Litwak.
    1966 Writings begin to appear in SoulbookBlack DialogueNegro Digest (Black World), Black ScholarJournal of Black PoetryBlack Theatre, and Muhammad Speaks.
    Black Dialogue staff visits Eldridge Cleaver and Bunchy Carter in Soledad prison. Marvin is present. Black Dialogue publishes Cleaver’s essay, “My Queen, I Greet You,” later it appears in Soul On Ice. Co-founds Black Arts West Theatre with Ed Bullins, Ethna Wyatt, Duncan Barber, Hillery Broadus and Carl Boissiere.
    1967 Co-founds Black House political/cultural center in San Francisco with Eldridge CleaverEd Bullins and Ethna Wyatt.  Amiri BarakaSonia Sanchez,Askia Toure, Sarah Webster Fabio, Chicago Art Ensemble, Avotja, Reginald Lockett, Emory Douglass, Samuel Napier, Lil Bobby Hutton, Huey Newton, Bobby Seale, attend Black House.
    Black Panthers plan invasion of state capital at Black House. Marvin joins Nation of Islam, flees to Toronto, Canada to protest draft and resist Vietnam War.
    1968 Goes underground to Chicago shortly before assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Lived on Southside during riots. Meets Don L. Lee, Gwen Brooks, Hoyt Fuller,
    Phil Choran, Carolyn Rogers, Johari Amini and others of Chicago BAM (Black Arts Movement. In Harlem joins Ed Bullins at the New Lafayette Theatre. Works as associate editor of Black Theatre magazine. Associates with Amiri Baraka, Askia Toure, Sun Ra,
    Sonia Sanchez, Nikki Giovanni, Last Poets, Barbara Ann Teer, Milford Graves. Publishes Fly to Allah, poems that later establish him as the father of  Muslim American literature, according to Dr. Mojah Kahf of the University of Arkansas department of English and Islamic Studies.
    1969 Apprehended returned from Montreal, Canada, charged with draft evasion. Defended by Conrad Lynn. Returns to California to stand trial and teach at Fresno State University until removed at the insistence of Governor Ronald Reagan, “by any means necessary.” Angela Davis is also removed from teaching at UCLA. Student protesters burn computer center at Fresno State. Students from throughout California attend draft trial in San Francisco.
    1970 Convicted, flees into exile a second time, this time to Mexico City and Belize. Marries Barbara Hall, a student from Fresno State College, in Mexico City. Revolutionary artists Elizabeth Catlett Mora and Poncho Mora witness civil ceremony. Deported from Belize because his presence was not beneficial to the welfare of the colony of British Honduras. While in custody, police ask him to teach them about black power. Sentenced to five months in Federal prison, Terminal Islam. Serves as Muslim minister.
    1971 First daughter born, Nefertiti. Founds Black Educational Theatre in Fresno. Performs musical version of Flowers as Take Care of Business. Reactionary negroes kill choir director in theatre, put hit out on poet. He flees to San Francisco, opens Black Educational Theatre in Fillmore District, joined by Sun Ra’s Arkestra. Produced five hour musical version of Take Care of Business, with cast of fifty at Harding Theatre on Divisadero, choreography by Raymond Sawyer and Ellendar Barnes.
    1972 Produced Resurrection of the Dead, a myth/ritual dance drama with Plunky, Babatunde Lea, Victor Willis as lead singer (Village People), dancers included Raymond Sawyer, Jamilah Hunter, Nisa Ra, Thomas Duckett. Lectures at University of California, Berkeley in Black Studies. Marries UCB student, Nisa (Greta Pope), second daughter born, Muhammida El Muhajir. Awarded National Endowment for the Arts fellowship.
    Travels to southern Mexico, Oxaca, Trinidad and Guyana. Interviews prime minister Forbes Burnham. Interview appeared in Black Scholar. Published Woman—Man’s Best Friend, poems, proverbs, lyrics, parables, Al Kitab Sudan Press.
    1973 Third daughter, Amira Sauda, born to Barbara (Hasani). Returns to San Francisco State University, awarded BA. Earns MA in one semester, English/Creative writing. Teaches at SF State, black literature, journalism, radio and television writing.
    1975 Lectures at Mills College, Oakland. Produced musical version of Woman—Man’s Best Friend. Upward Bound program pressured director Connie Wye to halt production. She refused, suffered a cerebral hemorrhage and expired.
    1976 Organizes Eldridge Cleaver Crusades. Hires staff of Black Muslims for Cleaver’s ministry. Meets Donald Rumsfeld, Charles Colson, Jim and Tammy Baker, Rev. Robert Schuller. Deals with Rev. Billy Graham, Rev. Falwell, Pat Roberson, Cal Thomas, Pat Boone, Hal Linsey, Art DeMoss.
    1978 Returns to Fresno. Falls in love with Sharon Johnson, childhood friend. See autobiography Somethin Proper.
    1979 Lectures at University of Nevada, Reno. Awarded two National Endowment for the Humanities planning grants. Produced Excellence in Education Conference. Participants included Eldridge Cleaver, Dr. Harry Edwards, Dr. Wade Nobles, Fahizah Alim, Sherley A. Williams, Ntizi Cayou, Dr. Ahimsa Sumchi. Publishes Selected Poems. Returns to Oakland to organize Melvin Black Human Rights Conference at Oakland Auditorium to stop police killing of black men. Participants included Minister Farakhan, Angela Davis,
    Paul Cobb, Eldridge Cleaver, Khalid Abdullah Tariq Al Mansour, Dr. Yusef Bey, Dezzie Woods-Jones. Police killings stop but drive by shootings begin along with introduction of Crack.
    1980 Produced National Conference of Black Men at Oakland auditorium. Participants included Dr. Yusef Bey, Dr. Nathan Hare, Dr. Wade Nobles, Dr. Oba T’shaka, Dr. Lige Dailey, John Douimbia (founder), Betty King, Dezzie Woods-Jones.
    1981 Taught drama at Laney College. Did production of In the Name of Love. Taught manhood training at Merritt College.
    1982 Taught English at Kings River Community College, Reedly CA. Retires from Teaching with 97% student retention rate. Meets Marsha Satterfiend.
    1983 Vends on streets of San Francisco, organizers vendors (mostly white) under his non-profit corporation. Harassed under color of law, “too much power for a nigguh” in downtown San Francisco, especially in the Union Square shopping area.
    1984 Vends political buttons at Democratic and Republican conventions. San Francisco Chronicle called him the “Button King.” In Dallas, the Republicans observed his salesmanship and said, “If he makes one more dollar, he’ll be a Republican.” Descends into the muck and mire of hell: Crack drives him into the mental hospital several times.
    1989 Writes article on Huey Newton, based on last meeting in Oakland Crack house. Article becomes source of Ed Bullins’ play, Salaam, Huey, Salaam. Article is beginning of autobiography, Somethin’ Proper.
    1990 Begins recovery at San Francisco’s Glide Church with Rev. Cecil Williams and Janice Mirikitani. Transcribes testimonies of Crack addicts. Writes docudrama of his addiction and recovery One Day In The Life.
    1995 Transition of Marsha Satterfield at 41 years old, cancer. Poet flees to Seattle, WA. Works on autobiography. Publishes Love and War, poems.
    1996 Produces One Day In The Life with Majeeda Rahman’s Healthy Babies Project, a recovery program for woman and children. Play performed at Alice Arts Theatre.
    1997 One Day In the Life opens at Sista’s Place in Brooklyn, New York, also Brecht Forum in Manhattan and Kimako’s Blues in Newark, New Jersey, home of the Barakas.
    1997 Attends National Black Theatre festival, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Meets Carolyn Turner. She provides him with time and space to finish autobiography, plenty of sweet tea and dirty rice, in the tradition of the film Mr. and Mrs. Smith.
    1998 Transition of Eldridge Cleaver. Kathleen Cleaver approves poem “Soul Gone Home” to be read at funeral in Los Angeles. Marvin and Majeeda Rahman organize memorial service in Oakland. Participants included Emory Douglas, Tarika Lewis, Richard Aoki, Dr. Nathan Hare, Reginald Major, Dr. Yusef Bey, Minister Keith Muhammad, Imam Al Amin, Kathleen and Joju Cleaver. Publication of autobiography Somethin Proper.
    1999 Establishes Recovery Theatre. Begins run of One Day in the Life. Gets support from Mayor Willie Brown of San Francisco after Uhuru House performance. One Day becomes longest running black play in the Bay. Ishmael Reed says, “It’s the best drama I ever saw.”
    2000 Meets Suzzette Celeste, MSW, MPA.
    2001 Produces Kings and Queens of Black Consciousness at San Francisco State University. Participants included: Nathan and Julia Hare, Rev. Cecil Williams,
    Dr. Cornell West, Amiri and Amina Baraka, Ishamel Reed, Askia Toure, Avotja, Eddie Gale, Rudi Wongozi, Rev. Andriette Earl, Dr. Theophile Obenga, Elliott Bey, Destiny, Tarika Lewis, Phavia Kujichagulia, Suzzette Celeste, Tureeda, Geoffrey Grier, Rev. Otis Lloyd, Kalamu ya Salaam, Ptah Allah-El. Funded by Glide Church and Vanguard foundation.
    Video of Kings and Queens screened at New York International Independent film festival. In Newark on 9/11, stopped at airport by police. Daughter Muhammida’s documentary Hip Hop the New World Order, screened on 9/12.
    2002 Transition of son Darrel at 38, suffered manic oppression. Publication of In the Crazy House Called America, essays.
    2004 Produced San Francisco Black Radical Book Fair. Participants included Amiri and Amina Baraka, Nathan and Julia Hare, Al Young, Askia Toure, Kalamu ya Salaam, Ishamel Reed, Sonia Sanchez, Reginald Lockett, Charlie Walker, Jamie Walker, Davey D, Opal Palmer Adisa, Devorah Major, Fillmore Slim, Rosebud Bitterdose, Sam Hamod,
    Tarika Lewis. Published Land of My Daughters, poems, and Wish I Could Tell You The Truth, essays. Published issue of Black Bird Press Review newspaper.

    2006 Writes Sweet Tea, Dirty Rice, poems; Up From Ignorance, essays; Beyond Religion, Toward Spirituality, essays; Mama Said Use The Mind God Gave You, autobiographical novel. Archives go to Bay Area university. Transition of friends: Dr. Salat Townsend, Paul Shular, Alonzo Batin, Dewey Redman and Rufus Harley.


    Bibliography of Marvin X

    Books

    Sudan Rajuli Samia (Fresno: Al Kitab Sudan Publishing, 1967)
    Black Dialectics (Fresno: Al Kitab Sudan, 1967)
    Fly To Allah: Poems (Fresno: Al Kitab Sudan, 1969)
    Son of Man: Proverbs (Fresno: Al Kitab Sudan, 1969)
    Black Man Listen: Poems and Proverbs (Detroit: Broadside Press, 1969)
    Woman-Man's Best Friend (San Francisco: Al Kitab Sudan, 1973)
    Selected Poems (San Francisco: Al Kitab Sudan, 1979)
    Confession of A Wife Beater and Other Poems (Fresno: Al Kitab Sudan, 1981)
    Liberation Poems for North American Africans (Fresno: Al Kitab Sudan, 1982)
    Love and War: Poems ( Castro Valley: Black Bird Press, 1995)
    Somethin Proper: Autobiography (Castro Valley: Black Bird Press, 1998)
    In The Crazy House Called America: Essays (Castro Valley: Black Bird Press, 2002)
    Wish I Could Tell You The Truth: Essays (Cherokee: Black Bird Press, 2005)
    Land of My Daughters: Poems (Cherokee: Black Bird Press, 2005)
     Works In Progress

    It Don't Matter: Essays (Cherokee: Black Bird Press, 2006)

    You Don't Know Me and Other Poems (Cherokee: Black Bird Press, 2006)

    In Sha Allah, A History of Black Muslims in the San Francisco Bay Area, 1954-2004 (Cherokee: Black Bird Press, 2006).

    Seven Years in the House of Elijah, A Woman's Search for Love and Spirituality by Nisa Islam as told to Marvin X, 2006.


    Play Scripts and/or Productions
    Flowers for the Trashman, San Francisco: San Francisco State University Drama Department, 1965.

    Flowers for the Trashman, San Francisco: Black Arts West/Theatre, 1966.

    Take Care of Business, musical version of Flowers with music by Sun Ra, choreography by Raymond Sawyer and Ellendar Barnes: Your Black Educational Theatre, San Francisco, 1972.

    Come Next Summer, San Francisco: Black Arts/West, 1966.

    The Trial, New York, Afro-American Studio for Acting and Speech, 1970.

    Resurrection of the Dead, San Francisco,  choreography by Raymond Sawyer, music by Juju and Sun Ra, Your Black Educational Theatre, 1972.

    Woman-Man's Best Friend, musical, Oakland, Mills College, 1973.

    How I Met Isa, Masters thesis, San Francisco State University, 1975.

    In The Name of Love, Oakland, Laney College Theatre, 1981.

    One Day In The Life, Oakland, Alice Arts Theatre, 1996.
    One Day In The Life, Brooklyn, NY, Sistah's Place, 1997.
    One Day In The Life, Manhattan, Brecht Forum, 1997.
    One Day In The Life, Newark, NJ, Kimako's Blues, 1997.
    One Day In The Life, Oakland, Uhuru House, 1998.
    One Day In The Life, San Francisco, Bannam Place Theatre, North Beach, 1998.
    One Day In The Lifee, San Francisco, Lorraine Hansberry Theatre, 1999.
    One Day In the Life, Marin City, Marin City Rec Center, 1999
    One Day In the Life, Richmond, Unity Church, 2000.
    One Day In the Life, San Jose, San Jose State University, 2000.
    One Day In the Life, Berkeley, Berkeley Repertory Theatre, 2000.
    One Day In the Life, Sacramento, New Colonial Theatre, 2000.
    Sergeant Santa, San Francisco, Recovery Theatre script, 2002.

    Other

    Delicate Child, a short story, Oakland, Merritt College Student Magazine contest winner, 1963.

    Delicate Child, a short story, Oakland, SoulBook Magazine, 1964.

    Flowers for the Trashman: A One Act Drama, San Francisco, Black Dialogue Magazine, 1965.

    Flowers for the Trashman, Black Fire, An Anthology of Afro-American Writing, edited by Amiri Baraka and Larry Neal, (New York: Morrow, 1968).
    Take Care of Business: A One Act Drama, aka Flowers, (New York: The Drama Review, NYU,1968)

    The Black Bird (Al Tair Aswad): A One-Act Play, New Plays from the Black Theatre, edited by Ed Bullins with introduction (interview of Ed Bullins) by Marivn X, (New York: Bantam, 1969)

    "Islam and Black Art: An Interview with Amiri Baraka" and foreword by Askia Muhammad Toure, afterword by Marivn X, in Black Arts: An Anthology of Black Creations, edited by Ahmed Alhamisi and Haroun Kofi Wangara (Harold G. Lawrence) (Detroit: Black Arts Publications, 1969).
    "Everything's Cool: An Interview with Amiri Barka, aka, LeRoi Jones"Black Theatre Magazine, New Lafayette Theatre, Harlem, NY, 1968.

    Resurrection of the Dead, a ritual/myth dance dramaBlack Theatre Magazine, New Lafayette Theatre, Harlem,  1969.

    Manifesto of the Black Educational Theatre of San FranciscoBlack Theatre, 1972.

    The Black Bird, A Parable by Marvin X, illustrated by Karen Johnson ( San Francisco: Al Kitab Sudan and Julian Richardson and Associates Publishers, 1972).
    "Black Justice Must Be Done," Vietnam and Black America: An Anthology of Protest and Resistance, edited by Clyde Taylor (Garden City: Double-day/Anchor, 1973)

    "Palestine," a poemBlack Scholar magazine, 1978.

    Journal of Black Poetry, guest editor, 1968.

    "The Meaning of African Liberation Day," by Dr. Walter Rodney, a speech in San Francisco, transcribed and edited by Marvin X, Journal of Black Poetry, 1972.

    Muhammad Speaks, foreign editor, 1970. (Note: a few months later, Marvin X was selected to be editor of Muhammad Speaksuntil it was decided he was too militant. Askia Muhammad (Charles 37X) was selected instead.)

    A Conversation with Prime Minister Forbes Burnham of Guyana, Black Scholar, 1973.
    VIDEOGRAPHY OF EVENTS/PRODUCTIONS

    Proceedings of the Melvin Black Human Rights Conference, Oakland, 1979, produced by Marvin X, featuring Angela Davis, Minister Farakhan, Eldridge Cleaver, Paul Cobb, Dezzie Woods-Jones, Jo Nina-Abran, Mansha Nitoto, Khalid Abdullah Tarik Al Mansur, Dr. Yusef Bey, Dr. Oba T-Shaka, and Marvin X.

    Proceedings of the First Black Men's Conference, Oakland, 1980, John Douimbia, founder, Marvin X, chief planner, Dr. Nathan Hare, Dr. Wade Nobles, Dr. Yusef Bey, Dr. Oba T'Shaka,Norman Brown, Kermit Scott, Minister Ronald Muhammad, Louis Freeman,   Michael Lange, Betty King, Dezzie Woods-Jones, et al.

    Forum on Drugs, Art and Revolution, Sista's Place, Brooklyn, New York, 1997, featuring Amiri and Amina Baraka, Sonia Sanchez, Sam Anderson, Elombe Brath and Marvin X.

    Eldridge Cleaver Memorial Service, produced by Marvin X, Oakland, 1998, participants included Kathleen and Joju Cleaver, Emory Douglas, Dr. Yusef Bey, Minister Keith Muhammad, Imam Al Amin, Dr. Nathan Hare, Tarika Lewis, Richard Aoki, Reginald Major, Majidah Rahman and Marvin X.

    One Day in the Life, a docudrama of addiction and recovery,  filmed by Ptah Allah-El, produced, written, directed and staring Marvin X, edited by Marvin X, San Francisco: Recovery Theatre, 1999.
    Marvin X Interviews Bobby Seale, co-founder of the Black Panther Party, former actor in Marvin X's Black Theatre: Berkeley, La Pena Cultural Center, 1999.

    "Abstract for An Elders Council," lecture/discussion, Tupac Amaru Shakur One Nation Conference, Oakland: McClymonds High School, 1999.

    Marvin X at Dead Prez Concert, San Francisco, 2000.

    Kings and Queens of Black Consciousness, produced by Marvin X at San Francisco State University, 2001, featuring Dr. Cornel West, Amiri Baraka, Amina Baraka, Dr. Julia Hare, Dr. Nathan Hare,  Rev. Cecil Williams, Destiny, Phavia, Tarika Lewis, Askia Toure, Kalamu Ya Salaam, Rudi Wongozi, Ishmael Reed, Dr. Theophile Obenga, Marvin X, et al.

    Live In Philly At Warm Daddies,  a reading accompanied by Elliot Bey, Marshall Allen, Danny Thompson, Ancestor Goldsky, Rufus Harley, Alexander El, 2002.
    Marvin X Live in Detroit, a documentary by Abu Ibn, 2002.

    In the Crazy House Called America, concert with Marvin X and Destiny, San Francisco: Buriel Clay Theatre, 2003.

    Marvin X  in Concert (accompanied by  harpist Destiny, violinist Tarika Lewis and percussionists Tacuma and Kele Nitoto, dancer Raynetta Rayzetta), Amiri and Amina Baraka, filmed by Kwame and Joe, Berkeley: Black Repertory Group Theatre, 2003.

    Marvin X Speaks at the Third Eye Conference, Dallas, Texas, 2003.

    Marvin X and the Last Poets, San Francisco: Recovery Theatre, 2004.
    Proceedings of the San Francisco Black Radical Book Fair, produced by Marvin X, filmed by Mindseed Productions, San Francisco, Recovery Theatre, 2004, participants include: Sonia Sanchez, Davey D, Amiri Baraka, Sam Hamod, Fillmore Slim, Askia Toure, Akhbar Muhammad, Sam Anderson, Al Young, Devorah Major, Opal Palmer Adisa, Tarika Lewis, Amina Baraka, Julia and Nathan Hare, Charlie Walker, Jamie Walker, Reginald Lockett, Everett Hoagland, Sam Greenlee, Ayodelle Nzinga, Suzzette Celeste, Tarika Lewis, Raynetta Rayzetta, Deborah Day, James Robinson, Ptah Allah-El, Kalamu Ya Salaam, Marvin X, et al. (Note: let me please acknowledge some of the historic personages in the audience: Gansta Alonzao Batin (mentor of the Bay Area BAM, made his transition shortly after the conference), Willie Williams of Broadside Press, Detroit, Gansta Brown, Gansta Mikey Moore (now Rev.), Arthur Sheridan, founder of Black Dialogue magazine, also co-founders Aubrey and Gerald LaBrie, Reginald Major, author of Panther Is A Black Cat. Thank you all for making this event historic, ed. MX)
    Get Yo Mind Right, Marvin X Barbershop Talk, #4, a documentary film by Pam Pam and Marvin X, Oakland: 2005.

    Marvin X Live in the Fillmore at Rass'elas Jazz Club, A Nisa Islam production, filmed by Ken Johnson, San Francisco, 2005.

    Marvin X in the Malcolm X Room, McClymonds High School, accompanied by Tacuma (dijembe and percussion, dancer/choreographer  Raynetta Rayzetta, actor Salat Townsend, filmed by Eddie Abrams, Oakland, 2005.
    AUDIOGRAPHY
    In Sha Allah, interview with Nisa Islam, Cherokee, 2004.
    In Sha Allah, interview with Nadar Ali, Fresno, 2004.
    In Sha Allah, interview with Manuel Rashid, Fresno, 2004.
    In Sha Allah, interview with John Douimbia, Grand Ayatollah of the Bay, San Francisco, 2004.
    In Sha Allah, interview with Minister Rabb Muhammad, Oakland, 2004.
    In Sha Allah, interview with Antar Bey, CEO, Your Black Muslim Bakery, Oakland, 2004.
    In Sha Allah, interview with Norman Brown, Oakland, Oakland, 2004.
    In Sha Allah, interview with Kareem Muhammad (Brother Edward), Oakland, 2004.
    Love and War, poems, Oakland, 1995.
    One Day In The Life, docudrama, Oakland, 1999.
    Jesus and Liquor Stores, Marvin X and Askari X, Oakland, 2002
    Wake Up, Detroit, Marvin X interviewed by Lawrence X, Detroit, 2002..
    Wish I, interview with Pam Pam, San Francisco, KPOO Radio, 2005.
    Wish I, interview with Terry Collins, San Francisco, KPOO Radio, 2005.
    Marvin X and the Black Arts Movement, interview with Professor James Smethurst of UMASS, Oakland, 2003.

    *   *   *   *   *


    The Contributors


    Dr. Mohja Kahf, professor of English and Islamic Literature, University of Arkansas. Her essay is revised (by ed.) from an earlier version that appeared online at Muslim Wake Up.Com. She is the senior editor of the forthcoming anthology Muslim American Literature, University of Arkansas Press. Marvin X is a co-editor. Her recent collection of poetry is E-Mails from Scheherazad, University Press of Florida.

    Lorenzo Thomas, professor of English at the University of Houston, Texas, and author of Extraordinary Measures: Afrocentric Modernism and Twentieth-Century American Poetry, University of Alabama Press, 2000.

    Michael Idland's essay is from African American Dramatists: A Bio-Bibliographical Critical Sourcebook, Greenwood Publishing Group, 2004.

    Lee Hubbard is a Bay Area journalist, this interview appeared in the San Francisco Bayview newspaper.

    Dr. Nathan Hare, sociologist/psychologist, is the father of black studies in America. He and his wife, Julia, are close associates, comrades and advisors to Marvin X. He is author of the classic sociological study The Black Anglo-Saxons. With wife Julia, he is co-author of The Endangered Black Familyand The Miseducation of the Black Child.

    Fahizah Alim writes for the Sacramento Bee newspaper. Marvin X is her mentor. Her critical comments on Islam and male/female relations have been a source of inspiration to the poet.

    La Vonda R. Staples is an online personality for newblackcity.com and creator of "Literally Speaking," an internet live book club.


    James G. Spady's essay appeared in the Philadelphia New Observer. He is recipient of the American Book Award and the National Newspaper Association's Meritorious Award. His works have appeared in newspapers, magazines, and scholarly journals such as African Studies Review, International Journal of African Studies, College Language Association JournalBlack ScholarPresence AfricaineJournal of African Civilizations and elsewhere.

    Steven Winn is drama critic for the San Francisco Chronicle.

    John Woodford is former editor-in-chief of Muhammad Speaks. He is currently editor of Michigan Today at the University of Michigan.

    Suzzette Celeste, MSW, MPA is a social worker and spiritual practitioner at the East Bay Church of Religious Science. She also teaches counseling at Oakland's Merritt College.

    James W. Sweeney is former director of the Oakland Independent Support Center, an outpatient center for the homeless and dual diagnosed. He is a former Berkeley City Councilman.

    Aeesha and Kokoman Clotty are directors of Attitudinal Healing Center in Oakland and co-authors of Racial Healing.

    Rudolph Lewis manages the African American literary website ChickenBones. He will soon publish "The Best of ChickenBones," and it is one of the best sites for African American literature on the internet. The best source for up-to-date writings by Marvin X, up-to-the-minute! Thanks Rudy for your hard work-a true trooper!

    Ishamel Reed is a poet, novelist, essayist, playwright, editor and publisher. He has taught at Harvard, Yale, and Dartmouth, and for twenty years has been a lecturer at the University of California Berkeley. He is a supporter of Marvin X's many projects.

    Lil Joe is Los Angeles community activist and revolutionary theoretician. He was among the group of revolutionary students from southern California who supported Marvin X when he fought to teach at Fresno State University but was removed by then Gov. Ronald Reagan, 1969. These students also supported his draft trial. They said, "We want Marvin X, not in Vietnam, not in jail, but on campus." Joe was also a member of the Black Panther Party. (Note: We love you Lil Joe for raising high the banner of revolution! As Mao taught, "The reactionaries will never put down their butcher knives, they will never turn into Buddha heads.")

    Pam Pam is a community activist in San Francisco's dangerous Sunnydale district. She also produced, filmed and co-directed a film on Marvin X, Git Yo Mind Rite. She has a weekly program on San Francisco's KPOO radio.

    Terry Collins, nephew of Malcolm X through his sister Ella Collins, is one of the founders and directors of KPOO radio. Terry was one of the revolutionary students at San Francisco State University, along with his roommate Danny Glover (who performed in Marvin X's Black Arts West Theatre), fellow students Joe Rudolph (KPOO founder, peace be upon him) and Marvin X.

    Dr. Julius E. Thompson's essay appeared in African American Review. He is a professor of African American Studies.

    Reginald Major is author of The Panther Is A Black Cat, a study of the Black Panther Party. He writes for Pacifica News Service.

    Dingane (Joe Goncalves) is founder and publisher of the 60s bible of poetry, the Journal of Black Poetry.

    Dennis Leroy Moore is a New York filmmaker. His  As An Act of Protest is an awarding winning film about the Neo-Black Arts Movement.

    Junious Ricardo Stanton is a journalist who writes for newspapers nationwide, especially online journals such as The Black World Today.

    Brecht Forum is a New York center for radical culture.

    Johari Amini's (Jewel C. Latimore) review is from Negro Digest (Black World), 1969. Johari is one of the beautiful sister poets of the Chicago Black Arts Movement.

    James Smethurst’s The Black Arts Movement: Literary Nationalism in the 1960s and 1970s. He is Assistant Professor of Afro-American Studies at the University of Massachusetts.

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    Leftists need a sense of humor, learn to laugh because human behavior is tragi-comic at best. So they need to come out of their PC straight jacket, especially their Psycholinguistic Crisis. Don't say the N word, B word, MF word, LGBTXYZ word. Don't say brother, sister, king, Queen, God, goddess. In short, don't say shit, shut the fk up, especially if you ain't Pan African, Kemetic, Super Sunni, Five per cent, Mo, old black panther, new black panther, Wakandan, Kingdom of Africanan, Neo-Marxist, Communist, Democratic Socialist Muslim, or none of the above, just a low information vibration Nigga, shut the fk up. Yeah, eat yo mush and hush!
    A brother called me today. He said, Marvin, I'm running behind for our appointment. I said, running behind? Nigga you 400 years behind. They said (and you know who they are; then again maybe you don't cause some niggas don't know who Miss Ann is, for sure we don't know who the white man is)--they said the other day it will take us 240 years to catch up with the wealth white folks have today? So as between 400 years and 240 years, where are you in the time spectrum? How long will it take you to get to me for our appointment today?
    --Marvin X
    4/10/18

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    Marvin X on his star student
    Dr. Ayodele Nzinga



    Yes, she is the very best of us, a mother, genius in our midst. We have to own her otherwise "they" shall claim her as their chattel real, personal property.

    We can get sucked into their white hole and before we know it we are in too deep. Baraka suffered from this artistic schizophrenia, trying to please two worlds but at his best, in his last days, he belonged to us and came to speak our language rather than theirs! He warned us against listening to the Sirens calling us to their island with their enticing sounds. Yes, Mama Ayanna, we must protect Ayodele as our treasure, warrior woman, artistic freedom fighter supreme. Yes, perhaps she learned verbosity from her Master Teacher, but she may also learn his lesson of silencia por favor.

    North American African Poet
    i am a poet
    language and ideas
    are my meat & bread
    the eye a tool
    that captures the light spilling
    on to the fully dressed fig tree
    the flight of birds
    the wind over the grass
    the pain in a mothers eyes
    the hunger in a childs
    the anger in a mans
    i listen for the meaning behind the words
    waiting for the truth
    like an off schedule bus
    reflecting reflecting reflecting
    like a mirror the
    things that pass
    through me living with the things
    that will not pass away
    but cling stubbornly to life
    myths that crumble when examined
    lies manifest to protect the guilty
    the unevenly cut pie
    the wolves selling merry-go-round tickets
    law in the land of the lawless
    the ugly secrets bandaged by
    a flag and an anthem
    living in the nation
    buried deep within the nation
    there is another rhythm
    a steady rising wave
    another drum beating
    real reality lives here
    not the story in books
    funky non commercial real
    realness is Africans dancing
    in front of the white house
    demanding freedom and the american
    way come out to talk
    its telling the truth no matter
    what it sounds like
    or what they want to hear
    its not caring when they see
    you point the zombie finger &
    make that high-pitched squeak
    that denotes they have noticed
    you are awake traveling in stealth
    with the sheep when wolves smell
    lions and guerrillas they panic
    cause they are unruly
    refused to be ruled by wolves
    won’t ape the story
    on the news they are noisy
    hard to control and known
    for waking sheep i like lions
    & apes
    & sheep that are
    awake so for them
    i tell the truth
    i write the songs
    & the eulogies
    explain the difference
    between what is &
    what needs to be
    i am their poet
    eating their pain
    carrying it inside
    trying to transform it into
    food for the battle
    bandaging the wounds
    sucking out the poison
    outing wolves
    urging them to move forward fearlessly
    i am the drum beating inviting the dance
    i am the drum beating calling the dancer
    i am the drum beating
    i am the drum

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    Marvin X poetic reply to Ayodele Nzinga Poem

    For Linda Johnson, Dance Queen



     We think poets still dancing his poet heaven!




    i am the drum beating inviting the dance
    i am the drum beating calling the dancer
    i am the drum beating
    i am the drum
    --Ayodele Nzinga

    Marvin X Response 

    I am the silent dancer
    the cool cat by the wall
    dancing in his head
    til the last dance with his girl
    he knows the ritual
    last dance 
    infinite possibilities
    no last dance 
    finite possibilities cool cat
    I dance
    beyond Smokey's Oh, Baby, Baby
    later in life the drum calls me 
    jungle life love myth-ritual
    all is dance
    god is dance
    love dance
    birth dance
    death dance
    harvest dance
    rain dance
    war dance
    even now fourth quarter I dance
    in my head dance
    too lazy to move dance

    some friends have never seen me dance
    but dance in my head always
    choreographers amy favorite people
    especially interpreters of my poetry
    Sun Ra dancers
    Judith Wisteria 
    Ellendar Barnes
    Resurrection of Dead dancers
    Charlene Jamilah Hunter
    Nisa Ra
    Thomas Beckett
    Rashidah
    Amina
    Raymond Sawyer
    Suzzette Celeste
    dance
    I swoon 
    I am heaven dance
    my poetry
    arms sway
    legs leap
    torsos turn
    heads twist
    dance 
    I am moved
    in my stillness
    moved.
    you can't see me
    cool cat by the wall
    dancing in silent stillness.
    --Marvin X
    4/11/18


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    The Honorable Cat Brooks, next Mayor of Oakland







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    Poem for Kiilu Nyasha, Revolutionary Woman Supreme







    There are those who talk revolution
    those who make revolution
    With heart mind soul body blood sweat tears
    Every ounce of being
    Every step revolutionary step

    Unchain the chained
    Liberate captives.from dungeon
    Free the global wage slaves
    No matter no family
    No matter no walk
    Crawl revolution
    Kiilu
    Like Mumia
    Chained yet free
    what's your excuse

    Kiilu chained in big yard
    Yet free to free unfree
    Long live revolutionary sista
    Kiilu Nayasha.
    Black Panther Woman
    Harriet Tubman Woman
    Kiilu would have freed more slaves
    if they had known they were slaves!

    --Marvin X
    revised 4/13/18


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    U.S. forces are using white phosphorus munitions in Iraq but it’s unclear exactly how

     

    U.S. Army soldiers with Battery C, 1st Battalion, 320th Field Artillery Regiment, Task Force Strike, execute a fire mission in northern Iraq on Aug. 14 2016. White Phosphorus smoke rounds are pictured in the right-hand corner. (1st Lt. Daniel Johnson/U.S. Army)
    U.S. forces are using white phosphorus munitions in their fight against the Islamic State based on pictures and videos posted online by the Pentagon, but it is unclear exactly how the controversial armament is being employed.
    White phosphorus shells are intended to make smoke screens or signals for advancing troops. When launched against soldiers and civilians, however, the munition can cause severe burn wounds that can be dangerous for medical personnel treating the injured.
    International humanitarian law stipulates that white phosphorus munitions should only be used in areas devoid of civilians. Even using it against enemy combatants has raised concerns, given that the munitions can cause horrific injuries.
    Photos posted on a Pentagon-managed public affairs website show a U.S. Army artillery unit in Iraq using white phosphorous munitions, specifically M825A1 155mm rounds. The M825A1 shell can create a smokescreen that lasts about 10 minutes and contains 116 felt wedges impregnated with white phosphorus that jettison and automatically ignite when they come in contact with the air.
    Col. Joseph Scrocca, the public affairs director for the U.S.-led coalition, said Wednesday that the rounds are used for “screening and signaling.”
    “Coalition forces use these rounds with caution and always in accordance with the Law of Armed Conflict. When M825A1 rounds are employed, they are done so in areas free of civilians and never against enemy forces,” Scrocca said in an email.
    On Thursday, Air Force Col. John Dorrian, the spokesman for the U.S.-led coalition in Iraq, revised Scrocca’s statement.
    “In the foreground of the photo are 155mm white phosphorous rounds, which are used for screening, obscuring, and marking. When U.S. forces use these munitions, as required by the Law of Armed Conflict, they do so in a way that fully considers possible incidental effects on civilians and civilian structures,” Dorrian said in an email. “The U.S. military takes all reasonable precautions to minimize the risk of incidental injury to non-combatants and damage to civilian structures.”
    When asked on the phone whether U.S. forces had used white phosphorus munitions for anything other than screening, obscuring or marking, Dorrian said the munitions had been “used generally for the circumstances which I described.”
    He could not say how many times it had been used or whether it had been dropped on enemy combatants or their equipment.
    Dorrian also said the image posted online was taken when U.S. forces were supporting a Kurdish peshmerga assault with artillery strikes. The 48-hour operation, called Evergreen II, involved 2,000 Kurdish fighters as they fought to secure the Gwer River bridge in the northern Iraqi town of Gwer. Dorrian said the white phosphorus smoke rounds were used to obscure Kurdish forces moving on enemy positions on the opposite bank of the Great Zab River.

    The town of Gwer. In the top left is the Gwer River bridge in January 2016. (Thomas Gibbons-Neff/The Washington Post)
    Dorrian was unable to say whether the rounds had been dropped away from the town, on Islamic State positions, and if they had been used in the town, whether civilians were present.
    The United States has used white phosphorus in Iraq before, notably in the 2004 battle for Fallujah, when Marine artillery batteries were scrutinized for firing the munitions on entrenched insurgents. In Afghanistan, white phosphorus was used by U.S. troops, primarily in the country’s restive east. In 2009, NATO forces there were accusedof burning an 8-year-old girl with the munitions.
    Mark Hiznay, the associate arms director for Human Rights Watch, said he was wary of the U.S.-led coalitions use of white phosphorus munitions and was concerned about its possible use in the upcoming campaign to retake the Islamic State stronghold of Mosul.
    “When white phosphorus is used in attacks in areas containing concentrations of civilians and civilian objects, it will indiscriminately start fires over a wide area,” Hiznay said. “U.S. and Iraqi forces should refrain from using white phosphorus in urban areas like Mosul because whatever tactical military advantage is gained at the time of use, it will be far outweighed by the stigma created by horrific burns to civilian victims.”

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  • 04/13/18--21:13: sunrise over damascus
  • sunrise over damascus
    saul fell on damascus road
    became paul
    persecutor to liberator
    paul's christology mythologized slavery
    servants be obedient to your masters
    official sermon of black slave preachers
    mlk's mentor howard thurman mama told him
    boy read me the bible
    stop when you get to paul
    don 't wanna hear bout obedient servants
    yes mama
    howard thurman said
    mlk plagiarized his mentor in I have a dream
    sunrise over damascus
    primordial city rich history
    down road to Jerusalem
    house of peace with no peace
    land of Canaan
    brother of Egyptians
    then came Abraham
    Sarah Hajar
    Jews Arabs
    Isaac Ishmael 
    ancient times no peace
    no peace now
    land of prophets
    Jeremiah Isaiah 
    told us wickedness
    where are the prophets of now
    so needed at the gates of Jerusalem Damascus
    Lebanon Egypt Iraq Persia
    armies near Jerusalem to destroy what
    what is not destroyed already
    the people are dead souls in the dead sea
    cedars of lebanon burn sweet incense of death
    frankincense myrrh burn in the holy temple for naught
    biblical prophesy
    end is near
    who is there to see sunrise over damascus
    isis
    israel
    saudi arabia
    russia
    lebanon
    turkey
    usa usa 
    iran
    gulf states
    egypt 
    turkey
    kurds
    where is saladin the kurd
    who is richard lionhearted
    who is not 
    neo-crusade
    persia rises again
    from Tigris Euphrates to Mediterranean
    can we stop history
    fulfill whose mythology
    jewish christian islam
    myth is myth
    my story his/her story
    sunrise over damascus
    a million dead
    how many poison gas dead
    dead is dead
    no matter how
    blood bones is blood bones
    a million dead
    bullets bombs poison gas no matter
    what mind game is this
    dead are dead
    no matter how
    no matter why
    we cry for syria
    we cry
    sunrise over damascus.
    --Marvin X
    4/13/18


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    Nefertiti Jackmon and New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu at the Chicago Equity Summit.
    Nefertiti was part of the City of Austin, Texas delegation that included Austin Mayor Steve Adler who introduced her to Mayor Landrieu who may run for president of US. Nefertiti heads Six Square, the Austin Black Cultural District.

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    Call for auditions. If you would like to audition for the role of Marvin X and/or Miss Libby in this short film, please call 510-575-7148. Audition by appointment only. Videographer Adam Turner, music score by David Boykin of Chicago. Script by Marvin X. Directed by Dr. Ayodele Nzinga.


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    Marvin X interview with Dr. Pasquli